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Archdouche

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About Archdouche

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    Landsmen
  • Birthday January 3

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    Sweden

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  1. Indeed. It is painful to see the video of her undeserved fate. I will never understand the logic behind the way that she was discarded. We can all understand that post ww2 economies were indeed sluggish for the wartorn countries, but wouldn't she at least have survived to more favourable economic times by being placed in dry-dock and having regular paint oversights? Something i doubt would have taken extrordinary economic funding. I do wonder if HMS Wellesley would have shared the same fate had she not been bombed.
  2. I know, guess I'm butt hurt for our great failure almost 400 years on­čśë (That is probably one of the best failures we have achieved considering what an awesome museum it all became)
  3. I'm talking about the brick with four decks that some more wise Spanish naval officer's wanted to reclassify as an floating battery because of her outright horrendous sailing ...... "qualities"..... But you are absolutely right, we will never know what the Cronan would have been. Most likely the propositions for her would never have been considered because of cost reasons. More likely would be the Spiran or the Äpplet (1792). As an interesting note I have seen plans by chapman on the 48pndr guns. I do not at the time know if any were made for test, but they would have been powerful naval guns to be sure.
  4. You are right in a way about that. Sweden built three-deckers, although the last of these were built in the early 18th century. The main disadvantage with the bigger ships being from a Swedish point of view high draught, something that is not ideal in the Swedish (and at the time Finnish) abundance of archipelagos. This is the reason that Wasa and the following nine ships (Including the "Wasa" ingame, actually "Kronprins Gustav Adolph" to be built to almost the same lines having a low draught. Some of the excellent features of this class was that it could navigate in shallows far better than any Russian SoL's. another not really related quality of the Wasas was their highly placed lower gundeck, giving it excelling combat capabilities in rough seas. After the Swedish-Russian war of 1788-1790 there was however calls from the Swedish navy for larger lineships to be able to take a more rigid place in the line of battle. Not that the navy was disappointed in the Wasas, but they recognized the need for larger SoL's to go into the line of battle against newer designs by traditional enemies like the russians and the danish since most of the combat in archipelagos was done with smaller ships like gunboats and Chapmans newly built archipelago frigates. And so came the design studies by Chapman and propositions on several new standard designs for new classes of Sol's. (Three-deckers are also freaking expensive compared to the more all round 74-80 3rd rates) Well, that big failure of naval engineering was based on people's at the time basic understanding of physics. Vasa (Or correct old swedish spelling "Wasa") was just built a bit to narrow by the original designer (who happened to be dutch, not pointing fingers..). The sister ship of Wasa (1628) was made a bit wider and actually were working ships, even if the heeling tendencies were never appreciated by their commanding officers, they served. As a fact, Wasa's sister the "Äpplet" was identified sunk as a block ship some week ago in the archipelagos around Stockholm. But even though "Äpplet" was probably never a noteworthy sailor she survived for thirty years before being discarded.
  5. Indeed it would. Chapman was a damn capable naval designer and the designs that were completed were up to expectations. If he could pull off a ship of that size we will never know, but I believe that he made the adoptions and design details needed for it to be possible. After all, he relied on mathematics for all his designs, and math does not usually fail in giving a pretty good result. It would truly be an awesome ship. And hopefully and likely have better sailing qualities than the brick with sails that is called Santisima Trinidad­čśë
  6. Swedish Ships of the Line by af Chapman About a year and a half ago I ordered high res scans of Chapman plans from the Swedish war archives. But because of costs for every single scan and very limited information of what every scan actually was I did not order more than a few on Chapman´s 94 gunner "Spiran". As it happens, as of now the archives has scanned most of the plans for the whole array of Chapman Projects regarding ships of the line. And although many midsections and deck-plans are still not scanned, I hope the ones that are available will get you attention for these wonderful ships. Some of these ships have been seen before on the forums, but many of the plans are completely new. Many of these ships are in my opinion the most beautiful vessels of their respective class with their sleek lines as evidence of Chapman´s genius and they deserve to be seen by more ship enthusiasts than me. Most of these ships are never built projects by Chapman, Only "Prince Adolph Fredrick", "Gustav III and Adolph Fredrick" and the modified "Dristigheten" are actually completed ships. (Confusing naming with two "Adolph Fredrick" I know...) All pounds listed for guns are in Swedish pounds which is roughly 0.94 British pound and the measurements are in Swedish feet, which where one Swedish feet is roughly 0.97 British feet. All lengths is between perpendiculars. Enjoy! Kronan/Cronan 110 Guns 1792 Length: 212 feet 8 inches Beam: 56 feet Draught: 23 feet 8 iches 30* 48pndr!!! 32* 36pndr 30* 24pndr 18* 12pndr https://imageshack.com/a/jJ0e/1 Spiran 94 Guns 1792 Length 202 feet Beam: 53 feet 4 inches Draught: 23 feet 8 inches 30* 42pndr 32* 30pndr 32* 18pndr https://imageshack.com/a/UIte/1 Äpplet 80 Guns 1792 Length: 194 feet Beam: 51 feet 5 inches Draught: 23 feet 30* 42pndr 32* 24pndr 18* 12pndr https://imageshack.com/a/2Qte/1 Unnamed 74 Gunner 1792 Length: 184 feet Beam: 49 feet 8 inches Draught: 22 feet 28* 36pndr 30* 24pndr 16* 12pndr https://imageshack.com/a/uzte/1 Gustav III and Adolph Fredrick 74 Guns 1764 Length: 174 feet Beam: 46 feet 8 inches Draught: 21 feet 3 inches 26* 24pndr 28* 18pndr 20* 8pndr https://imageshack.com/a/CE6e/1 Dristigheten 1805 Refit 74 Guns Length: 167 feet Beam: 46 feet Draught: 21 and 11/12 feet Wartime armament like ingame Wasa but extended top deck https://imageshack.com/a/on6e/1 Unnamed 66 Gunner 1792 Length: 176 feet Beam: 47 feet Draught: 21 feet 26* 36pndr 28* 24pndr 12* 8pndr https://imageshack.com/a/NY6e/1 Prins Adolph Fredrick 62 Guns 1762 Length: 169 feet Beam: 45 feet 8 inches Draught: 21 feet 24* 24pndr 26* 18pndr 12* 6pndr https://imageshack.com/a/o56e/1 Unnamed 54 Gunner 1792 Length: ? Beam: 44 feet Draught: ? Armament: ? https://imageshack.com/a/Vc6e/1
  7. Nice, is that also one of his projects or is it a actually built ship? I┬┤m stupid, of course you meant the unbuilt project ship...
  8. The 110 gun ship, project name Kronan has complete plans in the swedish war archives.There also exists for example : 60 gun unnamed project, Äpplet 80 guns, Nyckeln 66 guns and the Spiran. These are all projects by Chapman that never were built, although i suspect the 60 gunner bear similarities to Wasa. The 110 gun, 94 gun, 80 gun, 66 gun all have complete plans including rigging. For those interested they are all named after the swedish crown jewels, a naming tradition in sweden for larger naval ships. I´m planning on visiting the war archives next week and dig around a bit. As far as I know the late 74 gun project (not the Gustav III) by Chapman was built as the Carl XIII. There is however a 74 gunner drawn by Gilbert Sheldon (grandson of Francis Sheldon) in the Archives from 1780.
  9. Hmm, indeed a beutiful ship. The name is not "Spiral" but Spiran, swedish for scepter. I have bought these plans too (bloody expensive) for the sake of having eyegasms at them. Chapman really knew how to build boats. I had hopes of someday modeling this ship when I have refined my skills. But it's truly awesome to see someone actually making this pracically unknown ship a reality. If you would be missing any of the plans (like the rigging) I would be happy to send them to you.
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