Jump to content
Game-Labs Forum

Recommended Posts

Because there doesn't seem to be anything here yet, I thought I would throw in a reccomendation for reading resources that would help anyone trying to create a period accurate and realistic game for this time period.... or Models....or just anyone plum interested in this sort of thing.

The two books I have used to help expand my knowledge of the age of sail over the years are not the easiest to find but amazing resources.  These titles are

"Seamanship in the Age of Sail: An Account of the Shiphandling of the Sailing Man-Of-War 1600-1860" by John Harland.  This covers in detail how ships were rigged and handled, as well as specific maneauvers and how they were done.  Great resource.

The second resource I use is the book "Arming and Fitting of English Ships of War: 1600-1815" by Brian Lavery.  This includes information on deck layout, ships boats, the different kinds of guns and how they were used, ect.  Great for more than just the English Royal Navy, too.

There are many other great titles and resources I have not used but have an interest in, and I hope that this small token may be of use to everyone in the potential development of this and future projects!


Yours Faithfully,

                          Capt. Roan Alexander, R.N.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 These titles are

"Seamanship in the Age of Sail: An Account of the Shiphandling of the Sailing Man-Of-War 1600-1860" by John Harland.  This covers in detail how ships were rigged and handled, as well as specific maneauvers and how they were done.  Great resource.

The second resource I use is the book "Arming and Fitting of English Ships of War: 1600-1815" by Brian Lavery.  This includes information on deck layout, ships boats, the different kinds of guns and how they were used, ect.  Great for more than just the English Royal Navy, too.

 

 

Thanks for posting those great books.

 

we have both in our library)) 

But of course we are actively searching for new ones. I will post our names of books in our library once i have more time this weekend.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would love to see the Patrick O'Brian series have some influence on the game...many of us computer sailors love this series!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enlisted in the navy some years ago as a corpsman, thinking I'd do medical stuff on a boat.  Well... when I stood out in the middle of Afghanistan, surrounded by nothing but desert, I determined I was going to build a boat one day so I could eventually experience, you know, large bodies of water.  As such, I ordered quite a few ship building books, of which I'd be happy to scan in anything for you.

 

The History of the American Sailing Navy: The Ships and Their Development

The History Of American Sailing Ships

Yacht Designing and Planning: For Yachtsmen, Students, and Amateurs, by 

Boatbuilding: A Complete Handbook of Wooden Boat Construction

American Small Sailing Craft: Their Design, Development and Construction

The American Fishing Schooners: 1825-1935

 

These were all written by Howard Irving Chapelle

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I would love to see the Patrick O'Brian series have some influence on the game...many of us computer sailors love this series!

Yep i love his novels i own almost every one, besides "Desolation Island" which is very rare in polish language.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My favourite non-fiction books about the age of sail:

 

"The History of the French Frigate 1650-1850" - ANCRE

"Architectura Navalis Mercatoria" - F.H. Chapman

"Fregate de 8 - La Renommee 1744" - Ancre

"Ships and Science - The Birth of Naval Architecture in the Scientific Revolution, 1600-1800" - L.D. Ferreiro

"Remarks on the Navies of the English & the Dutch" - B. Ollivier, 1737

"Entwicklung, Entwicklung, Dokumentation und Vergleich der Achtzehnpfünder-Fregatten aus Großbritannien, Frankreich und den USA" - Boendel

(thesis about 18-pounder frigates, very interesting read!)

"The French Navy In The Seven Years War" - J.R. Dull

 

There are many more in my library, but these are the most interesting ones (to me, at least :P)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Desolation Island, may be the best.

 

Good non-fiction; "The Odyssey of the Essex"  by Frank Donovan.

 

I like the Time-Life book series (The Seafarers)  "The Frigates",  "Fighting Sail"  and others.  Lots of good pictures and even words for the learned coves.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enlisted in the navy some years ago as a corpsman, thinking I'd do medical stuff on a boat.  Well... when I stood out in the middle of Afghanistan, surrounded by nothing but desert, I determined I was going to build a boat one day so I could eventually experience, you know, large bodies of water.  As such, I ordered quite a few ship building books, of which I'd be happy to scan in anything for you.

 

The History of the American Sailing Navy: The Ships and Their Development

The History Of American Sailing Ships

Yacht Designing and Planning: For Yachtsmen, Students, and Amateurs, by 

Boatbuilding: A Complete Handbook of Wooden Boat Construction

American Small Sailing Craft: Their Design, Development and Construction

The American Fishing Schooners: 1825-1935

 

These were all written by Howard Irving Chapelle

 

Is that... You Forlorn Hope?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greetings gentlemen! 
I've recently purchased the first book in the Aubrey-Maturin series by the late Patrick O'Brian. (Master and Commander)
From the little I've read to date I can assure you it's fine literature. Perhaps a bit harder to read that what most people are used to (due to the terminology used, they even sell a Lexicon ), however, it's been a good read. 

Has anyone had experience with the series or any other Age of Sail books? It's amazing how much one is forced to learn about sailing terminology in them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Darn it, I was going to give you a rep-up, and accidentally did the opposite, I'll make it up mate.

I added your recommendations to my wishlist, I'm particularly interested in that one about Captain Kid, who would have known he was actually a privateer!

Edit: Gave ya a few extra good rep. :]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many large volume and small volume age of sail fiction out there. Here are some of the authors I have read.

 

Alexander Kent

Dan Parkinson

Dudley Pope

Richard Woodman

 

There is the Hornblower series which is probably the only series I havn't read.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you can get the complete Aubrey/Maturin audio books from most local libraries at Overdrive.com.

They just get better, the more you listen to them.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many large volume and small volume age of sail fiction out there. Here are some of the authors I have read.

 

Alexander Kent

Dan Parkinson

Dudley Pope

Richard Woodman

 

There is the Hornblower series which is probably the only series I havn't read.

I had not heard of these thank you!

 

I think you can get the complete Aubrey/Maturin audio books from most local libraries at Overdrive.com.

They just get better, the more you listen to them.

My last experience with listening to an audiobook was quite enjoyable. I was thinking how hard it would be to listen to an Aubrey Maturin book, and having to stop and look for the definition of a word, but I actually think listening might make it easier since I just have to pause the audio instead of holding on to the book page. 

Man, what laziness of mine, I read the Lord of the Rings with a dictionary next to me while growing up.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just recently read Michael Chricton and holy shit this german translation is HORRIBLE.. Ive rarely seen so sad phrasing and so many repetitions within one sentence.

I was disappointed and left it 3/4s not read.  Maybe it lost quality from the translation.. I dont know. The second book I have from him will be untouched for sure.

 

Best books are already listed by Johnny reb..

The dudley pope's books they are my top favourites so far.. Really enjoyable boos.

Hornblower is a very similar type of storytelling. If you can get your hands on it, Reb. read them. They are awesome ;) (Hornblower was the entrance-drug for me)

Those two are the best to read about storytold seamanship imo. (If that sentence makes sence)

 

btw: the biggest problem is to get some of these books. I have many books from a secon hand bookshop..

If your not afraid of english you may have more success in finding some of those books.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, so I have read many of the Royal Navy based books. Here is a basic overview as I remember them.

Aubrey/Maturin series. Fine books, a bit heavy in foreign and archaic languages. Some of the personal life sections get tedious. Still, I've read the entire series at least 3 times.

Bolitho (A. Kent). Also good reading. There were many books in this series. A bit harlequin romance at times, but engrossing none the less.

Hornblower, a classic and very different from the mini-series that starred Ioan Gruffudd (hint read the 4th book, Hornblower in the crisis last as it has spoilers)

Dudley Pope's Lord Ramage. By far the most interesting to me so far (although the constant re-explaining of things gone over before would earn an exasperated sniff from Southwick). These books walk the line between the stuffiness of Aubrey and the lewd Alan Lewrie.

Dewey Lambdin's Alan Lewrie. The Ram-cat, 'black' Alan Lewrie. Certainly wouldn't pass for a gentleman in Jack Aubrey's world (and actually a bit pornographic at times) but always a good read. He has you slapping your knee and chortling in mirth quite often.

There are many more, as well as excellent works of non-fiction relating to the lives of well known leaders and the ordinary men who go unnoticed and unmentioned.

Also, I have to admit that reading on an e-reader helps with translations etc... As much as I like paper it is easier than having a French, Spanish and Latin translator on hand when needed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm reading "Peter Simple" by Frederick Marryat. It is freaking awesome! He was actually a captain in the Royal Navy and served under Thomas Cochrane. The guy is actually a great writer, it's more about interesting characters but the sailing details are clearly done by a guy who knows what he's talking about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are many large volume and small volume age of sail fiction out there. Here are some of the authors I have read.

 

Alexander Kent

Dan Parkinson

Dudley Pope

Richard Woodman

 

There is the Hornblower series which is probably the only series I havn't read.

 

Om-nom-nom, thank you sir. *Goes and browses books*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd be willing to lend out the paper books I have. I have the following in paper,

 

Aubrey/Maturin series

Bolitho series

Hornblower series

 

I also have "Nelson, a dream of glory" John Sugden and "Over the edge of the world" Laurence Bergreen (about Magellan).

 

Drop a line and we can figure out details.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Used to read the Bolitho series, probably what got me interested in the age of sail in the first place. The WW1/2 era books by Douglas Reeman too (Alexander Kent was his pen-name for the Bolitho series).

 

And Sharpe, although not a naval series has a fair few naval battles in there and very well written.

 

Read some of the Ramage series too, its entertaining but not very realistic, in particular seems contrived that Ramage very rarely loses so much as a single crew member. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Battle at Sea. A DK book. Good pictures, good text. Starts from the begining untill now.

Fighting Techniques of Naval Warfare 1190 to Present by about half a dozen writers. Published by St Martins Press.

Theres bound to be some big fights when we start playing this game. May be of use.

As for fiction, I have read many of the books mentioned. Bolitho is one of my biggest heros, the man I try to be like, but I really love Lewrie. New book in January or Febuary.

Of course I love them all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The huge advantage to the Aubrey/Maturin series is the usage of correct terms, as well as O'Brien's penchant for pulling his battles out of real world logs of them.  Yes, the personal life stuff can get a little annoying if you're just hankering for pure sail on sail action, but at the same time, those personal stories, too, give you a very interesting slice of life from the period which can be extremely interesting.

 

I've read most of them, and I think I'll read them again shortly.  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 Yes, the personal life stuff can get a little annoying if you're just hankering for pure sail on sail action, but at the same time, those personal stories, too, give you a very interesting slice of life from the period which can be extremely interesting.

 

 

I think so too. Even when Post Captain reads like Jane Austen, it's much more interesting with sea battles interspersed.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...