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Looks like a good start indeed however I think your smoothing groups are wrong which causes the black spots. Also for a first ship this is gonna be nearly impossible to model if you are new to it. I'

Thanks Wind, but no way. The "forum" jumps a message saying Im not allowed to use that file extension in this forum (using Imgur). Have tried almost all "standard" file formats. Anyway, I'll try post

Months later (sorry guys) the Delft looks like this. Though job as i'm not an professional in 3d models.  The model has been made via drawings of it's original builder (Pieter van Zwijndrecht) in

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Ok... I've a new job starting, 6 days working, then 6 days off. In my 6 days off, I think I can start learning some of this.

Paid application recommendation is 3ds max? I want professional, but intuitive...

 

 

EDIT:  Wow, just checked pricing...I think I'll check out the freeware isle...

Edited by Grim DeGrim
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Starting to learn 3D modeling is not something to take lightly.  As you get the hang of manipulating polys, then you have to learn how to UV map, then texture, etc. etc.

 

It is daunting! And not an undertaking you will grasp in a weekend, or a month of weekends, or depending on you talent, a year of weekends.

 

I got a start with an excellent and intuitive free program called Wings3D and highly recommend it.  http://www.wings3d.com/

It will not get your models into a game, but be realistic.  Chances are, your first models will not be game worthy anyways.  Keep your poly count low...

 

This WWI SMS torpedoboot was done in Wings for Rise of Flight.  Months of part-time effort, much work still to be done...

SMS_Torpedoboot_zps04d3e059.jpg

Edited by SYN_Bloody-Bandy
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Hi all:

Im new to the forum, hence, hi again.

My work in the real world is inside the Naval Building industry. Hence, my  advice for the suitable software for ship's hull modeling is "Rhinoceros" combined with AutoCad(payed) or Draftsight(free).

With both softwares, profesional quality accurate hull models can be obtained.

Max, blender and similar softwares, albeit can give very nice results,  only allow for "artistic" modeling, with no accuracy.

 

 

 

Regards

Edited by IonAguirre
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My work in the real world is inside the Naval Building industry. Hence, my  advice for the suitable software for ship's hull modeling is "Rhinoceros" combined with AutoCad(payed) or Draftsight(free).

With both softwares, profesional quality accurate hull models can be obtained.

Somebody mentioned DelftShip somewhere earlier. Do you have any professional command on that? How does it compare to Draftsight?

~Brigand

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I use blender for everything from generating short videos to 3d models for fabrication with my CNC router.  Here are a couple of raw video samples  - all done with blender.  Fair Warning - there is a pretty steep learning curve.

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/37551566/PBY-5A%20model.jpg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ptw3C3cBebs

http://youtu.be/4rAIoBWQozw

Edited by LTCjRet
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I use blender for everything from generating short videos to 3d models for fabrication with my CNC router.  Here are a couple of raw video samples  - all done with blender.  Fair Warning - there is a pretty steep learning curve.

 

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/37551566/PBY-5A%20model.jpg

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ptw3C3cBebs

http://youtu.be/4rAIoBWQozw

How about you share some ship building tutorials? :D

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Hi again:

Well, a very good free alternative to DelftShip or even to Rhinoceros, is FreeShip, located at the hydronship website.

Hull modeling is a little bit more tricky than with Rhino, but the results are very good (In the quality range of DelftShip).

Then "Draftsight (free) + FreeShip(free as well), can do the hull work. Once the hull modeled, and exported, any 3D software, Blender like, can be used.

 

Regards

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  • 4 weeks later...

I use Lightwave myself as it is far cheaper than 3DS max or Maya and does pretty much everything those packages can do even some things they don't :) sadly I am just a hobbyist not a pro and like most hobbyists self taught but for a free 3D package Blender would be my recommendation as there are lots of you-tube video tutorials for learning blender. I was just having a look around the net for the old " pirates of the burning seas " forums as they had a great forum there with lots of resources for 3D ship modeling IE plans and threads on building tips but I can not seem to find it :/  Still that aside I am looking forward enormously to the release of this game " Naval Action " from what I have seen on you tube so far it looks like it will be truly awesome.

 

 

Found it...   http://forums.burningsea.com/forum/the-shipyard/shipwright-discussion

Edited by Eron Daly
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  • 2 weeks later...

Thanks Wind, but no way. The "forum" jumps a message saying Im not allowed to use that file extension in this forum (using Imgur). Have tried almost all "standard" file formats.

Anyway, I'll try posting only one pic just IN this same post, if it works, I'll include the tutorial.

 

I made the test and   IT WORKED ¡¡ Thanks a lot.

 

Lets Go with the tutorial .....

 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Well, hope this could help users interested on hull modeling:

NOTES:

The concepts below can be used with any software able for NURB surfaces modeling.

In order to remark that even from low quality plans a nice hull can be modeled, Im using one of the pics included in this same thread.

 

 

 

First thing to be taken into account:

How accurate is the model wanted to be ?

Fairing the curves and surfaces of the hull is a headache.

If what concerns about the hull, is its "look", and not a technical accurate description, my advice is following, what was done at the shipyards before the XVIII Century.
Lets try to define the hull from a very short number of curves using what was known as the "Flat Stringers" method.

 

PIC -1-

3s5G6DB.jpg

By using a sideview picture as a pattern, draw the keel and rabbet lines.
Albeit the ship may have a big number of frames(structural concerns), most hull shapes can be defined from a very short number of them. A good practice is .... The less the better.

The hull taken as example, can be almost completly defined from 4 or 5 sections. A quarter, two central, and a bow section. One more, defining the transom is a good choice.

The location of the frames is mostly perfomed from experience and by carefully studying the hull, but

Central frames: at around 1/6 of the Keel lenght, settled astern and ahead from the Main/middle section.
Quarter frame: The last frame astern, that fully lies on the keel.
Bow frame: The last frame ahead, that lies on the joint, between the stem and the keel(Stem foot).
Transom frame: The one that defines the transom shape.

Mark their locations on the rabbet line at the side view. Those marking points/lines, will be later used for 3D framing possitioning.
 

I've labeled them as A,B,C,D. Drawn in red

 

PIC -2-

QXABCuo.jpg

Some transverse reference lines are also required or ... we'll not be able to fit the scale, when changing to the front view.
Midships keel, Deck, bulkward and water lines marks, have to be drawn athwardships.(see picture 2, drawn in red)

 

 

PIC -3-

RBy6xUh.jpg

Now its time for frames drawing.
At the ship's plan front view, locate the frames that fit at the previously choosen places. With low quality scans , this may be a problem and the choice of the frames, may be either a matter of tray and error, or of guessing.

Once the choice made, and by using the backgrownd as reference, draw the frames . It doesn't matter the transverse plane where they are drawn, becouse we will "slide" each one to its corresponding mark on the keel or rabbet line.

The background location and scale for this “front” view, has been derived from those "athwardships" red lines drawn before at pic number 2.

 

 

 

PIC -4-

xXmunZ7.jpg

Select each frame and move to their previously marked locations along the keel/rabbet line. For this case a second sidewise translation has been required due to the keel beam (midplane keel drawing in red, translated copy in black).

At the front view of ships plans, frames are drawn ....Port halve-> Ahead of main; Starboard halve--> Astern of main, in order to avoid messing the lines. Hence, when translatin to the 3D world a simmetry operation must be done for some of them. (We want all frames at the same halve of the hull)

 

 

 

PIC -5-

COS3CtK.jpg

Due to the low quality of the scaned image some frames have been "scale corrected" in order to fit with the Top view. Note that  the scaling procedure has only affected the breadth of the frames. It has been a 1D scaling procedure.

 

 

PIC -6-

1fuSobP.jpg

All lines have been hidden, excepting those required for the hull modeling.
The ship's body now looks to be almost defined, but some stringers are required in order to increase the quality of the hull "skin".

 

 

PIC -7-

j5AC5Gg.jpg

This is the key of the "old" traditional design method. Once some key frames where built, a number of flexible flat boards where fitted along the hull at different vertical distances from the ships bottom.

Main (normally midship) frame was taken as reference for placing the boards.

Those boards where gently lied on each frame, allowing them to freely bend, and so, the shape of all remaining sections could be derived by direct measurement.
We are going to use a "virtual" approach to this method.

 

See picture -7-
At the side view, and using the background as a guide, lets draw a number of longitudinal members in such a way that their points are restricted to "lie" on each frame, starting at the stern post rabbet, and ending at the stem one (Orange).

The shape of the stringers must be such that they gently run from end to end of the hull with fair curves seen from any view. Drawn in orange at the picture.

Side and plan views show fair, smart curves for all stringers.

 

 

PIC -8-

wa6IjlN.jpg

The same from a 3D point of view

Now all guide curves required for the main body modeling are done. Depending on your software the procedure will be different.

For me, its a simple matter of "Surface through curves net" NURBS modeling.

 

 

PIC -9-

8lfdcU3.jpg

By using the NURBs surfacing tools of your software, and using the previously drawn curves the hull gets almost done.

If frames are duly choosen and corrected, and stringers well faired, the hull  results correct at the first attempt.

 

 

At picture 9, some lines(frames) and blue ones (waterlines) can be seen. Those lines are a "result" and not a building tool in the software I use.

 

 

ADVICES:
For Hull modeling NURBS methods a lot better tha Mesh ones.
If one stringer is choosen along the waterway board, it can be later used for the main deck building.

COMMON ERRORS: Using too much frames. As I said at the beggining the less the better.
If a high accuracy is required then the Job is a lot longer.

 

COMMENT: May be waterlines look to sharpened at the bow. Including one more frame ahead can solve the question.

 

 

Kind regards.

Edited by IonAguirre
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That depends on your own experience.

You can move the verts around and try to match them on the plas. You will need to adjust the verts a lot to make a nice smooth curve. If you dont you may end up with edges and/or stupid angles.

 

Another way is to use curves in the first place. Model them around the "frame timbers" and use a modifier to bind a mesh to it.

this tutorial shows you what I mean

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Best way would be breaking the hull surface in two longitudinal parts.

 

Fphtep1.jpg

 

A surface to be defined from the rabbet line (garboard strake) to what I've labeled as Key stringer. Another from this strike up to the waterway, and the last, from this one to the bulkward upper edge.

 

Many times odd results may happen when trying to build the outer hull skin with just a single instruction. Try building the central section of the hull and both ends in a separate set of surfaces.

 

 

w3rB4PM.jpg

This is a highly accurate 3D model of NSM Montañes (74 class) built for naval engineering and architectural porposes. Check how surfaces have been built in parts.(Blue surfaces => Decks )

Surfaces have been constrained to have the same curvature at the contact lines.

 

If a very accurate model is not required, allowing for some "loose" of the surfaces from the base lines will make fairing a lot easier.

 

Regards

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Well I must say somehow this game unleashed my fantasy.

I am planning to create some nice ship with nice environemnt ( water, stones, maybe cave or port ) and render it. I already have a picture in my mind. So now to put it into Maya and see how it will look.

But it will take some time.   

 

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  • 3 months later...

hey IonAguirre,

 

I've tried following your method to create the hull on Rhino. However I've always had trouble with getting the surfaces right with the network of curves tool. Could you give me a few more pointers? I've created the curves,but after using the tool it only creates a partial surface. The end sections seem to be giving me a lot of trouble. 

 

 

test3.jpg

 

test2.jpg

 

Thanks, 

iMack

Edited by iMack
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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi iMack:

All surfacing methods have the same problems you've found. The way to go, is using diferent methods for each part.

 

The hull central section can be built from a single "Surface from curves network" instruction, but take care not to use the Autosort option.

 

For the hull "heads" some partial surfaces can be worked the same way, while others are better modeled by "Surface from edges".

 

Another way I use a lot, is ... Once the main part is surfaced, a number of new partial lines are drawn at the required parts. Those lines (frames and stringers), must be in touch with the old ones (new stringers with old frames and vice versa) granting for fair new surfaces.

Once that new and denser curves network is done, the instruction "Surface from curves network" can be used again. Anyway, there will always be a set of little remaining "holes" that can be mostly solved by surfacing from edges.

The continuity and fairing of all surfaces is achived by means of selecting, where possible, surfaces edges instead of lines and by selecting the "tangency" option at the suitable edges.

 

The most complex part is usually the stern, and specially the part where the sharpened shapes of the hull beside the stern post, must meet the plannar transom.

This part must be thought like a fan shaped structure, that starting from the uppermost place of the sternpost runs up and sideways for meeting the lower edge of the transom.

 

Another thing to point is that building a real and accurate hull, is not a matter of a few minutes, but quite a long one, take it easy.

 

 

My congratulations, your model looks quite nice and accurate.

Edited by IonAguirre
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