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'Oliver Cromwell' Frigate/Privateer Ship (With Plans)


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'Oliver Cromwell'


 


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This vessel, 80 feet keel, 27 feet beam, 12 feet depth of hold, was ordered built at Saybrook (Essex) by the General Assembly January 81st, 1776, and was the largest full-rigged ship constructed for the State under the general direction of the Governor and Council of Safety. Uriah Hayden, ship builder, was chosen to do the work under the supervision of Capt. Seth Harding, who was paid £32.6.9 for his services, according to voucher dated Jan. 30, 1776, on file, and various payments were made beginning April 2,1776, and continuing to October 23, 1776, as the work progressed, during which time £1750 had been paid, according to orders on the Committee of the Pay Table drawn by Benjamin Huntington, Clerk of the Council. These payments included provision for rigging which was furnished by Ephraim Bill; Wm. Lax for making the gun carriages; Nathaniel Wales for muskets and gun locks, and Capt.. Benj. Williams for iron and blacksmith work. The Cromwell was launched at Saybrook on Thursday, June 13, 1776. On Thursday night, August 1, 1776, she was struck by lightning, which did considerable damage to her main and mizzen masts, but repairs were quickly made, and on Sunday, August 18th, the new ship of war Oliver Cromwell, commanded by William Coit, Esq., sailed out of Connecticut River and arrived at New London on Tuesday, August 20th, 1776, the largest craft that had ever come over Saybrook bar, and piloted by James Harris. On Oct. 22, 1776, Titus Hosmer, a member of the Council, gave an order to Mr. Buell for 40 firearms to be delivered to Captain Coit for the use of the ship. The next day James Tilly of Saybrook was allowed £400 for cordage, and Levi Young was appointed Master and warrant as such issued by the Governor. Captain Coit also received two months cruising orders and Nathaniel Shaw of New London was directed to supply the ship with whatever it needed. On Nov. 15th, Captain Colt was allowed £1,000 for the use of the ship and Mr. Shaw £2,000 for public use. Dr. Samuel Lee of Windham was appointed Surgeon of the Cromwell on the same day. On Dec. 14, 1776, Nathl. Shaw was authorized to draw a letter of credit in favor of Captain Coit, for use when necessary, for repairs or supplies while in any foreign port, and Dr. Albigence Waldo was appointed Chief Surgeon of the ship, as evidently Dr. Lee resigned...


 


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From my research from threedecks.org, she was a privateer, has 22 guns, a broadside weight of 71 guns, and a burthen weight of 160 tons.

 

Historically, she was lost in an action in Narragansett Bay on the 27th of August 1777 and ran aground.  She never even fired her cannons.  She was very heavily grounded, so the British destroyed her.

 

Quite surprising that there are surviving records for this ship.  Wind, you need to spill the beans tell us where you are finding these amazing plans!

 

I would post links showing where I found this info, but I can't as for some reason I can't paste things into this textbox...

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Well, she's a private vessel, named to suit the whim or politics of the owners.

Maybe their ancestors were staunch roundheads.

Neither the Whigs nor Tories would have looked kindly on it, would they? I don't know anything about British politics.

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Still probably a nice upgrade to the snow. Don't know how difficult it would be to run down a merchant ship though.

Agree, adding this ship as an unlock after snow would be great.  Also, here is a post with some little frigates to choose from. 

 

http://forum.game-labs.net/index.php?/topic/2863-swan-class-ships-models-with-pictures/

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  • 1 year later...

Looks like a smashing little vessel. I've a soft spot for the Snow, therefore this one could be a nice addition to my little fleet.

 

Well, she's a private vessel, named to suit the whim or politics of the owners.

Maybe their ancestors were staunch roundheads.

Neither the Whigs nor Tories would have looked kindly on it, would they? I don't know anything about British politics.

The context of the name is very important and 'Oliver Cromwell' appears to have been chosen for its connotations. Cromwell fought against his king, was instrumental in the defeat of Charles I, was prominent during the trial and execution of Charles, and ruled Britain's only republic, the Commonwealth, between 1653-58*. By comparison the rebels of 1775-83 were fighting against their king, intending to defeat the king's forces militarily and establish a republic. Naming the ship after the man who just 120 years or so before had a hand in fighting and killing an English king was not an accident.

*Calling it a 'republic' is stretching the term rather. Cromwell wanted to establish England as God's country, governed by Godly men in parliament, but found that it wouldn't work so he ruled as 'Lord Protector', splitting up the country to be ruled by his generals. Cromwell was in effect king, and whilst he did turn down an offer of the crown there are arguments that he intended to be, even wanted to be, crowned king.

Edited by Rikard Frederiksen
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Looks like a smashing little vessel. I've a soft spot for the Snow, therefore this one could be a nice addition to my little fleet.

 

The context of the name is very important and 'Oliver Cromwell' appears to have been chosen for its connotations. Cromwell fought against his king, was instrumental in the defeat of Charles I, was prominent during the trial and execution of Charles, and ruled Britain's only republic, the Commonwealth, between 1653-58*. By comparison the rebels of 1775-83 were fighting against their king, intending to defeat the king's forces militarily and establish a republic. Naming the ship after the man who just 120 years or so before had a hand in fighting and killing an English king was not an accident.

 

Or, in summary, 18th C. trolling at its best.

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