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List of ships and other vessels in the game


Brigand
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They've built the 1747 Renommee, actually. She was an extremely fast 9-pounder frigate.

 

That leaves our 18-pdr Leda class, 12-pd Belle Poule, the generic 'Frigate,' which could be either 18 or 12-pdr, and Surprise, which really should carry 9-pdrs instead.

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They've built the 1747 Renommee, actually. She was an extremely fast 9-pounder frigate.

That leaves our 18-pdr Leda class, 12-pd Belle Poule, the generic 'Frigate,' which could be either 18 or 12-pdr, and Surprise, which really should carry 9-pdrs instead.

There are four frigates which are called the Renommée.

Frigate of 8-pdr = 1744

Frigate of 12-pdr = 1767

Frigate of 18-pdr = 1805

Frigate of 60-gun of 30-pdr = 1826

8-pdr for La Renommée of 1744. And she is taken in 1747 by Royal Navy.

Edited by Surcouf
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French poundage was also a touch higher than RN practice. Though not as much in this period as later.

(...)

 

Hmm, I'm not sure it is common to calculate broadside weight based on the actual weight of the shot, instead of the nominal weight of the shot?

livre    lb     ratio (Avoirdupois pounds converted to English pound)
36       40.3   1.119443753
24       26.6   1.108332649
18       20.1   1.116665977
16       18     1.124999306
12       13.4   1.116665977
 8        9     1.124999306
    avarage     1.118517828

That's all most confusing. My sources say that 1 Livre du roi equalled 1.079 English pounds. Which is ~ 0.040 lb difference with what your numbers give as an average.

 

I have a hard time finding the right number, do you have better information than the numbers as listed in the OP?

 

~Brigand

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I don't know how the Royal Navy frigate built la Renommée after his capture in 1747.

Maybe the Royal Navy was armed with 9-pdr ???

I'm not sure.

Yeah, the British put 9-pound guns on her.

 

Although in-game it is possible to arm her with 12-pounders. Just like Surprise. Unfortunately.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Id rather like to see the historical cannon counts than just adding in all the chasers.

It smells a lot like potbs to me.

And maybe some guys expect to have all the 144 guns of the santi on the sides..

 

Historical:

138 on the side. 6 chasers is 144. Wich is not correct in my understanding

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USS Essex (1799) added to the list.

 

 

Could you add date of disposal and fate? It would complete the list.

And great job on the list.

 

I could, but right now I don't have time to research the fate of each ship in the list.

 

Cheers,

Brigand

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Not sure that the Spanish lb is the same as avoirdupois. I have two different regional weights given, but the one associated with gunnery appears to be the heavier.

Again, not necessarily the ratio of lb to lb, but the reported high gauge size of a nominal 24 poundage weapon.

1.12 avoirdupios  = 1 Spanish.

(The relative value of a nominal pound being apparently 1.079, as with French practice, and also a higher gauge) - This broadly makes sense given their tendency to cooperate in Allied fleets for much of their history against the protestant countries of northern Europe.

 

 

If you are sure about it, I could easily change it. How many grams would a Spanish pound be?

 

~Brigand

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Spanish feet are a nuisance as they 'spread' considerably. (279mm (most commonly used) to 566mm), and their local poundages have similar variations.

 

Tell me about it, in the Dutch republic they used different feet in different cities, so far I've encountered 6 different sizes and one reference to miscalculations (in the 17th century) as a result of the difference in length between the Amsterdam foot and the Rijnlandsh foot.

 

Maybe some Spanish forum member has better access to historic sources and can come up with a more definite answer on the weight of a Spanish pound in grams in the 18th century?

 

~Brigand

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  • 1 month later...

We should just call the Privateer 'Lynx, Privateer Version'

 

It's still the same American Baltimore clipper, they've just modified the topsides and added a topgallant.

 

Also, Surprise is not the English translation of L'Unite. It's an entirely new name.

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