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Norfolk nChance

Mutiny on the Bounty, a myth in view perhaps...?

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Mutiny on the Bounty, a myth in view perhaps...?

For over 200years, its been the most infamous case of Royal Navy rebellion at sea. What immediately comes to mind probably is one of a tyrannical unrelenting Captain, and a First Lieutenant forced reluctantly into a course of action for the crew and his survival...?

I was looking at research for a second NA-OW short story and came across this one. My view going in was somewhat bias and not balanced at all, swayed by movies and general folk lore. However, just scratching the surface the basic story unravels quite quickly. I’m looking for more research, books or anything surrounding this case. If you know of anything please let me know...

The Idea...

... I’m playing with as a story arc. This time Bligh plays the protagonist and Christian the antagonist. The Admiralty also playing its part in structure, discipline and the Officer CREW relationship.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mutiny_on_the_Bounty

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UHTwFHnqGr8

The YouTube documentary is ok, and is more a starting point. The infamous Stolen Cheese event at the start of the voyage always framed Bligh the villain caught out stealing. The fact he was the ships Purser as well shows chain of command conflicts.

The respect from the crew was undermined by the Admiralty giving this mission to such a small ship. RN classed it as a CUTTER. There are many points of contention, but love him or loath him his navigation in the Jolly boat was remarkable.  

Please let me know if you’ve any thoughts or idea,

And again, thanks for reading

 

Norfolk

 

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1 hour ago, Norfolk nChance said:

For over 200years, its been the most infamous case of Royal Navy rebellion at sea.

I wonder why it's the most Infamous?  You're right of course, but Hermoine was far more bloody and they got away with it....and Spithead and The Nore were much larger and actually saw some success for the mutineers!  I think it has been romanticised and there is far too much sympathy for Christian and his bunch.  Bligh went on to command a 64 (He was at Camperdown and Copenhagen) and also got embroiled in the Nore mutiny....so twice burned.  I think what we have here is a reasonably strict Captain who was not unusual for the age, but who had the bad luck to have saddled himself with an entitled liberal in Fletcher Christian.  Kinda puts me in mind of our Millenials today. 

In my military career, I have seen countless young people come into the Navy and rebel against even todays gentle discipline.  I actually had one young man in my office crying to get posted off of subs because he had just learned that he can't email his girlfriend every night while the sub is dived! 

Edited by Angus MacDuff
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Discipline on board a ship is a very important thing. For proper functioning, for success, for courage, etc.

But it is very complicated to be a fair leader is competent at the same time ! being too close to your crew may hinder the execution of orders when the time comes. being too far away does not allow you to understand the needs of the crew and therefore also to hinder the proper functioning.

The balance between the two is very complicated to find. Add to that the character and education of the officers and the labyrinth becomes very twisted...

Even on a civilian ship like l'Hermione, there is a hierarchy and discipline imposed. If the commander says, we do. Without questioning the orders, same for the officers! A ship like a 12-pdr frigate like l'Hermione cannot afford to be lax in the execution of orders. The functioning of the edge remains close to the military.

But!!!!! Punishments no longer exist (cat with nine tails for example), the commander and officers eat with us, share moments, talk with us, etc. From a human point of view, we are at the same level, but not for navigation and manoeuvres.

At that time, there were wars and education and caste made there was a wall between officers and sailors. That was the life before. And discipline was not seen or experienced in the same way as it is today.

Blig h was most likely a tough man, and maybe Fletcher was too liberal for life on board at the time? I don't know. I don't know.

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23 minutes ago, Snoopy said:

William Bligh looks like Bilbo Baggins in his portrait. Now, you can't unsee it.

Dammit!!

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