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Ship paintings (Art collection)

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Konstantinos Volanakis


 


 


The exodus of Ares:http://forum.game-labs.net/index.php?/topic/6241-5th-6th-rates-collection-with-plans/?p=144850


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Battle of Navarino


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Sunset at the seashore


 


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Naval Battle at Lissa


 


Constantine_Volanakis_Naval_battle_at_Li


 


Before the storm


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The burning of a Turkish frigate


 


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The Austrian ship Kaiser


 


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The burning of the Turkish flagship by Kanaris


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Pulling the nets


 


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Volanakis-02.jpg


 


greek-frigate-at-anchor.jpg


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Notice the sails:

800px-Antoine_Roux-557346.jpg

 

800px-Antoine_Roux_COMBAT_DE_LA_SURVELLA

 

800px-Antoine_Roux_FREGATE_LA_THEMIS.jpg

 

800px-Antoine_Roux%27s_LE_MAGNANIME_TOWI

 

800px-Antoine_Roux_CAMILLA.jpg

 

Those are by Antoine Roux.

 

And that's Simon de Vlieger:

800px-Simon_de_Vlieger_-_Seascape_in_the

 

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By Aivazovsky

 

Aagaard:

474px-Martin_Aagaard_-_Skips_i_m%C3%A5ne

 

Aiguier:

1280px-Carenage_d%27un_voilier-A_Aiguier

 

Birch:

U.S.S._Wasp_Boarding_H.M_Brig_Frolic.jpg

 

Keppel:

800px-KEPPEL_%281853%29_pg145_VOLCANIC_M

Buttersworth

800px-James_E._Buttersworth_-_First_Rate

 

Corne:

800px-NH_65536-KN.jpg

 

Courdouan:

800px-Combat_du_Romulus_mg_5098.jpg

 

Drew:

800px-1879_Morning_Off_Boston_Light_byCl

 

Brager:

800px-Durand_Brager_1.jpg

 

Fischer:

The_Scuffle_Below_1918_Fischer.jpg

 

Garneray

800px-Napoleon-Elbe.jpg

 

Garneray again:

800px-Genova-1810ca-acquatinta-Garneray.

 

Van Bree

Van_Bree-Le_Friedland.jpg

 

 

You can get yourself a reproduction on canvas of any painting for cheap

 

i have gotten myself before a reproduction on canvas of Cossacks in the Mountain River by Franz Roubaud, 36x25 inches, for £50/$65/€58 in total by buying the reproduction on canvas offf amazon ( i contacted the seller to have the size custom and the colors custom as the one displayed on amazon was too pale ), and then buying the wooden frame and a canvas stretcher separately.

 

There are specialized websites but they are much more expensive, the quote for what i wanted was anywhere between 2 to 4 times more, sometimes for smaller sizes, ready made.

 

I am now looking towards buying a maritime art reproduction in canvas the same way and thought some of you might be interested in doing the same without spending lavish sums.

 

Just make sure that the quality and color are good enough beforehand, don't hesitate to ask the seller any questions. Larger reproductions require larger resolution copies, if the seller does not have a good enough picture you may try to find one yourself and send it to them.

Edited by Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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I think Turners HMS Temeraire is the most evocative Painting,you really get the sadness of the loss of such a beautiful Ship being towed to its eventual demise by the thing that would replace Sail and revoloutionise Naval Warfare......................Steam!

 

800px-Turner_J._M._W._-_The_Fighting_Tea

Indeed. This painting has to be not only one of the most famous paintings of age of sail ships, but also one of the most sad. From this we see the end of an era, and the beginning of the modern age of naval warfare. It's the defining painting that shows precisely where my interest is and is not.

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Not Stricly a painting but some very Early Photos of the Last of the Wooden Ships!

 

hmsconway_zpsuh2izjsx.jpg

Photo taken in the Menai Strait mid-April 1953.  On 14th April 1953 HMS Conway was under tow from her normal mooring to Birkenhead up the Menai Strait/ the Swellies between the Welsh mainland and Anglesey.  Close to a place called the Platters on the Caernarfon side of the strait she ran aground due to strong currents and could not be refloated.  She caught fire 30th October 1956 during dismantling and burnt to the waterline.

 

HMS Calypso.

hmscalypso1879_zps2hqat65e.jpg

 

HMS Marlborough.

 

hmsmarlborough3_zpsm4kvje6x.jpg

 

HMS Cambridge(Gunnery School)

nmr080497_zpswpqt2rgv.jpg

 

HMS St Vincent.

 

st_vincent_zpsrybclsoj.jpg

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Fight_of_the_Poursuivante_mp3h9427.jpg

The French frigate "Poursuivante" RAKES the HMS "Hercule" during the Action of 28th June 1803

 

 

Belle-poule-napoleon-morel-fatio.jpg

The French heavy frigate "Belle Poule", painted in funeral black, transfers the coffin of Napoleon I Bonaparte to the steamer "Normandie" at Cherbourg during the "return of the ashes", December 8th 1840

Edited by Captain Jean-Luc Picard
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Escadre de Richard Howe en vue de Gibraltar 1782

HMS Victory, the blue flag of Admiral Howe at her mainmast, leads a fleet of 65 warships and transports to lift the Great Siege of Gibraltar, 11 October 1782, in this oil painting by Richard Paton.

To the right, flying white ensigns, is the van under Vice-Admiral Samuel Barrington onboard HMS Britannia, and to the left the rear under Vice-Admiral Mark Millbanke onboard HMS Ocean. In the background is the Franco-Spanish fleet moored in Algeciras Bay.

Escadre_de_Richard_Howe_en_vue_de_Gibral

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The French 120-gun ship le Valmy. The biggest builded sail ship by the French nation. Painting ba Jonathan Florent.

Valmy jonathan Florient.jpg

Edited by Surcouf
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A naïve but very vivid painting showing a burning French ship of the line (fire caused accidentally), kept in the Brown University Library:

https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:240758/

Some misleading information from the Brown University Library on this picture:

1. The name of the ship is not "Mara", but "Mars". The title reads: "incendie du Vaisseau Le Mars dans le Port de l'ile de France".

2. The event has absolutely nothing to do with the campaigns of the War of the Second Coalition. Actually, this incident took place in 1773, and the painter too has distorted some facts.

The "Mars" was built by Groignard and Cambry (fils) for the French Compagnie des Indes. It was launched in 1769 at Lorient. It burnt down in 1773 at Port-Louis, Ile de France (Mauritius) by accident, as described by an eye witness, Jacques Dozouville, premier pilote of the Royal ship of the line "La Victoire", which was also at Port-Louis at the time.

Oddly enough, the painter has represented "Le Mars", which actually was a 64-gun ship, as an 80-gun ship typical of the late 1780s and 1790s. "La Victoire", which is also shown in the background on the right and was a 74-gun ship, has also been represented as an 80-gun ship, which is all the more strange as in 1773 "La Victoire" seems to have been armed with the peace time establishment of 38 guns, only. The uniforms and costumes of the officers and sailors are also more reminiscent of the late 1780s and 1790s, in my opinion, especially the top hats.

Dozouville's report and more information can be found here:

http://cduic.chez.com/pub/victoire.htm

 

So who painted this watercolour and when was it painted? Brown University says the painter was a certain Henry de Gueydon and that it was painted in 1798.

Honestly, I can't recognize a proper signature and date on the painting. Can it be found on the back?

Regarding the painter, he may indeed be an Henry de Gueydon, but then, which one? A clue is given by the caption which mentions the presence of a "Monsieur de Gueydon, Lieutenant du vaisseau Le Mars" ( N°.8, the officer abseiling from the bowsprit). Assuming that this man actually was the artist, he can only be Henry (or Henri) Rodolphe de Gueydon (1738-1807), the grandfather of the 19th century admiral Louis Henry de Gueydon. He became a lieutenant de vaisseau in 1772 (apparently serving on the "Mars"), and was promoted to capitaine de vaisseau in 1781. In 1790, he was politically active, apparently a staunch royalist and catholic, and therefore denounced as an enemy of the Convention and a traitor. It seems possible, in my opinion, that he eventually emigrated to Britain, but that's just an assumption.

Next question: was this watercolour executed in 1798? As mentioned above, I can't see a date on the painting. If there should be none at the back,  Brown University Library may have infered from the title of a second watercolour by the same Henry de Gueydon (also devoid of recognizable signature and date) that both watercolours were made in 1798. This second watercolour has been titled "Vue de l'Intérieure de Mill-Prison de Plymouth et de Ses Environs en 1798":

https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:240699/

As already mentioned, I consider it not unlikely that Henry Rodolphe de Gueydon had emigrated to Britain in the 1790s. If so, he would have painted his "Mill prison" painting - as a free man, not as a war prisoner (let out on parole) - in or after 1798, indeed.

His "Mars" painting may have been painted at about the same time but not necessarily in 1798 (unless explicitly stated somewhere on the painting or on some other contemporary document). It may equally well have been painted before or after 1798. If de Gueydon had returned to France after the Peace of Amiens, accepting the amnesty offer by Napoleon Bonaparte (his son, Henri Jehan François de Gueydon [1775-1836], married at Granville, France, in 1807, so the father may have been there as well), both watercolours could have been painted even after 1802 (but before 1807, when de Gueydon died), from memory and sketches, in France.

At any rate, the "Mars" painting was clearly "embellished" in several respects and, to some degree, must be looked upon as an anachronistic - though very interesting - view of an event that took place in 1773.

Edited by Wagram
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9 hours ago, Wagram said:

So who painted this watercolour and when was it painted? Brown University says the painter was a certain Henry de Gueydon and that it was painted in 1798.

Honestly, I can't recognize a proper signature and date on the painting. Can it be found on the back?

Regarding the painter, he may indeed be an Henry de Gueydon, but then, which one? A clue is given by the caption which mentions the presence of a "Monsieur de Gueydon, Lieutenant du vaisseau Le Mars" ( N°.8, the officer abseiling from the bowsprit). Assuming that this man actually was the artist, he can only be Henry (or Henri) Rodolphe de Gueydon (1738-1807), the grandfather of the 19th century admiral Louis Henry de Gueydon. He became a lieutenant de vaisseau in 1772 (apparently serving on the "Mars"), and was promoted to capitaine de vaisseau in 1781. In 1790, he was politically active, apparently a staunch royalist and catholic, and therefore denounced as an enemy of the Convention and a traitor. It seems possible, in my opinion, that he eventually emigrated to Britain, but that's just an assumption.

Next question: was this watercolour executed in 1798? As mentioned above, I can't see a date on the painting. If there should be none at the back,  Brown University Library may have infered from the title of a second watercolour by the same Henry de Gueydon (also devoid of recognizable signature and date) that both watercolours were made in 1798. This second watercolour has been titled "Vue de l'Intérieure de Mill-Prison de Plymouth et de Ses Environs en 1798":

https://repository.library.brown.edu/studio/item/bdr:240699/

As already mentioned, I consider it not unlikely that Henry Rodolphe de Gueydon had emigrated to Britain in the 1790s. If so, he would have painted his "Mill prison" painting - as a free man, not as a war prisoner (let out on parole) - in or after 1798, indeed.

His "Mars" painting may have been painted at about the same time but not necessarily in 1798 (unless explicitly stated somewhere on the painting or on some other contemporary document). It may equally well have been painted before or after 1798. If de Gueydon had returned to France after the Peace of Amiens, accepting the amnesty offer by Napoleon Bonaparte (his son, Henri Jehan François de Gueydon [1775-1836], married at Granville, France, in 1807, so the father may have been there as well), both watercolours could have been painted even after 1802 (but before 1807, when de Gueydon died), from memory and sketches, in France.

At any rate, the "Mars" painting was clearly "embellished" in several respects and, to some degree, must be looked upon as an anachronistic - though very interesting - view of an event that took place in 1773.

Second thoughts about the identity of the artist: As Henry Rodolphe de Gueydon had a son born in 1775 who was also called Henri (or Henry), the artist could just as well have been the son, of course. If so, both watercolours would have been painted by Henri Jehan (also: Henry Jean) François de Gueydon (who was an "agent comptable maritime", maritime accounting officer - apparently a post in the administration of the navy - at Granville in 1807), the "Mars" painting specifically to bring to mind a memorable event in the life of his father. This would certainly explain the inaccuracies of the painting much better...

Edited by Wagram

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