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sterner

Translation of military voice effects in Italian

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Hi

We need your help to translate military voice effects in Italian. Italian units will get voice acting in upcoming game. Time period is end of 18th century.

Thank you in advance.

 

English Italian
Aim  
Fire  
Ready  
Charge  
Retreat  
Die  
Kill them all  
Double Quick (Run)  
March  
Forward  
Halt  
Form line  
In column  
Hold position  
Form square  
Reload  
Save yourselves  
Deploy(deploy cannons)  
Now  
We will all die  

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Aim - Puntate

Fire - Fuoco

Ready - Pronti

Retreat - Ritirata

Die/(you) die - Muorire/Muori

Kill them all - Uccidiamoli tutti

March - Marciare

Form line - Formate una linea

Hold position - Tenete la posizione

Reload  - Ricaricare

Save youreselfs - Salvatevi !

Now - Adesso 

We will all die - Moriremo tutti !

 

 

Edited by Captan Thomas Fremantle
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Thank you! But there are missing translations. Could you please translate them too.

Charge

Double Quick (Run)

Forward

Halt(Stop)

In column

Form square

Deploy(deploy cannons)  

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On 1/15/2019 at 10:36 AM, Fillip de Travesay said:

Die/(you) die - Muorire/Muori

"Morire". Infinite form of to die.

"Muori!" is the imperative "die!"

8 hours ago, Fillip de Travesay said:

@sterner

Double Quick (Run) - Fugite/Scappate 

Forward - Inoltrare

Halt (Stop) - Fermi

In column - In colonna

Form square - this one i don't know

Deploy - Schiarare

Double quick (run) order in italian can be translated "doppio passo" or more correctly "passo di corsa!"

Forward, I suppose meaning to advance. In italian "avanzare!".

Halt(stop) is "alt!"

Form square, I suppose as military formation is "fare quadrato" (literally "make a square").

Deploy is "schierarsi".

 

Please do not try to use google to translate "technical" (in this case military orders/words).

 

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1 hour ago, Licinio Chiavari said:

Double quick (run) order in italian can be translated "doppio passo" or more correctly "passo di corsa!"

 

Are you sure? I think "doppio passo" was the same as the French "pas redoublé", or "pas accéléré", or "pas de manoeuvre", or "pas d'attaque", or "pas de charge"  - the latter not to be confused with the step used when the signal "La Charge" was given (all these terms denote a pace from between 100 to 120 steps per minute; exceptionally up to 140 steps per minute for specific light infantry units such as the Légion Corse [according to a 1772 document related to this unit]). In German, this pace is called "Geschwindschritt" or "Doppelierschritt", etc. It was used on the battlefield when large formations marched against the enemy lines, but also quite often on parades, etc.

The "pas de course" was a lot faster than the "pas redoublé", etc. Actually, the "pas de course" was used for storming when the signal "La Charge" was given. It was effective only on the last few meters before clashing with the enemy as it was virtually impossible to keep good order within one's own lines over a longer distance. It was also used by light infantry skirmishers. In German, this pace was called "Laufschritt" or "Sturmschritt".

Edited by Wagram

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17 minutes ago, Wagram said:

Are you sure? I think "doppio passo" was the same as the French "pas redoublé" or "pas accéléré" or "pas de manoeuvre" or "pas d'attaque" (all these terms denote a pace from between 100 to 120 steps per minute). In German, this pace is called "Geschwindmarsch" or "Doppeliermarsch", etc.

The "pas de course" was a lot faster than the "pas redoublé", etc. Actually, the "pas de course" was used for storming when the signal "Charge!" was given. It was effective only on the last few meters before clashing with the enemy as it was virtually impossible to keep good order within one's own lines over a longer distance. In German, this pace was called "Laufschritt" or "Sturmschritt".

The problem is double quick order. If meaning "run", it's "passo di corsa".

If it is meant to be an a accelerated march it's "passo doppio"... But an order no more in use nor almost never used in Italian.

Then we should move to which period, and which italian... Borbon Kingdom in southern Italy (so till 1860) used Naples dialect that is quite different from Italian... As genoan sailors used Genoa dialect on board: and it sound quite different (and not understandable) modern Italian sailors...

Aside some orders are not anymore used in modern Italian military.

 

Edited by Licinio Chiavari

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For clarification: The period I'm referring to is the late 18th to the early 19th centuries (in essence, the two last decades of the Ancien Régime, the Revolutionary and Napoleonic eras, the era of the Restauration in France, c. 1770 - c.1830).

Edited by Wagram

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2 hours ago, Wagram said:

For clarification: The period I'm referring to is the late 18th to the early 19th centuries (in essence, the two last decades of the Ancien Régime, the Revolutionary and Napoleonic eras, the era of the Restauration in France, c. 1770 - c.1830).

Let's make it simple.

We need vocals for both a fast paced march and run or only one?

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