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ram was a weapon carried by varied types of ships, dating back to antiquity. The weapon comprised an underwater prolongation of the bow of the ship to form an armored beak, usually between six and 12 feet (2–4 m) in length. This would be driven into the hull of an enemy ship in order to puncture it and thus sink, or at least disable, the ship.

Ramming "disappeared" as a naval battle tactic in the Age of Sail because, precision maneuvering (heading, turning, acceleration) was lost when propulsion changed from galleries of rowers to wind-powered sail. Reverse movement was impossible under sail and the ramming ship could not easily disengage from a sinking victim. Conversion to sail power was accompanied by advances in cannon metallurgy and technology. When rams were discarded as a weapon, hull design and construction changed to maximize the benefit of sail, to lift cannon higher, and to provide storage for powder and ball. The placement of cannons along the ships' broadside altered the chosen axis of attack.  A naval force or ship wanted the enemy bow-on and facing the force/ship's own broadside. When steam replaced sail propulsion, ramming was added back to the tactical repertoire.

So yes ramming was "virtually" removed from naval combat for some time but, the tactic's were still used by pirates. The Brigantine, a form of Brig was used during the early 18th century, the Brigantine represented a compromise between the more powerful classes of ship, such as the frigate and Man O' War, and the faster, but less well-armed schooner and gunboat. A Brigantine bore two masts, and was capable of fielding, on average, twenty-four guns over a single gun deck and the main deck; on top of this, they were fitted with a naval ram. In battle, Brigantine's typically alternated between delivering broadsides and ramming. They could move faster than most ships but could be easily checked by fire barrels.

So what am I asking?

Id like to see ramming implemented into Naval Action.

How would this work?

1. A Brigantine or Brig like ship would be added to the game. 

2. Game mechanics for ramming would have to be implemented as well. This would include what damage would be sustained when hit by a ramming ship at a given speed and angle.

Who gets the ship?

The ships would be readily available for the pirates to build and requiring a blueprint for other nations.

Applying ramming to other ships?

Ramming could be applied to other ships through refits ( adding a visible ram to the front of your ship ) or permanent upgrades ( ram penetration mod, speed mod, etc ).

Why ramming wouldn't be OP?

1. Depending on the angle ( anything less then a T bone does less damage ) if the ramming ship dose not finish you off he is at great risk of stopping / slowing down enough to be boarded or shot at.

2. You can move / angle yourself so that you do not get rammed

Ramming points of interest?

1. A T bone would cause a loss of side armor, hull / crew, and put the ship in shock if hit at a high enough speed.

2. A hit to the stern would cause a loss of stern armor and hull / crew.

3. A hit to the bow would cause a loss of stern armor and hull / crew.

Please give me your feedback and help me continue to research the application of ramming in the 18th century. Also you should help me make ramming a thing in Naval Action so we can see ships split in half.

WASAAAAAAAAA!!!

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On 10/8/2017 at 12:17 PM, CMCrisis said:

A Brigantine bore two masts, and was capable of fielding, on average, twenty-four guns over a single gun deck and the main deck; on top of this, they were fitted with a naval ram. In battle, Brigantine's typically alternated between delivering broadsides and ramming

Oh for the love of God NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I am so sorry sir but your historical reference has absolutely no base in fact whatsoever! Brigs and Brigantines were NEVER fitted with rams EVER!!!! This is fiction introduced by Assassin's Creed Black Flag.

Please for the love of god NEVER introduce this into this game or any other game EVER for that matter. Rams were a Mediterranean feature in classical antiquity with Biremes and Triremes and later with War Galleys. Galleys are generally not suited to the open seas and had limited use. Even the heavier Galleass had largely dispensed with the ram bow.

Galleys and rams largely fell out of use by the Napoleonic Era not to be seen again until the pre-dreadnought era and frankly never formed part of naval tactical doctrine in those latter years. Galleys with rams are fine....Brigs with them...NEVER...suitability in this game...ZERO.

(Apologies for my rant but there is nothing in this world that annoys me more than Assassin's Creed's desecration of Maritime history. Sadly we will see this again with the upcoming sequel Skull & Bones. I wonder if the Caribbean had ever even seen a ram bow other than USS Maine.)

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On 10/8/2017 at 6:17 AM, CMCrisis said:

ram was a weapon carried by varied types of ships, dating back to antiquity. The weapon comprised an underwater prolongation of the bow of the ship to form an armored beak, usually between six and 12 feet (2–4 m) in length. This would be driven into the hull of an enemy ship in order to puncture it and thus sink, or at least disable, the ship.

Ramming "disappeared" as a naval battle tactic in the Age of Sail because, precision maneuvering (heading, turning, acceleration) was lost when propulsion changed from galleries of rowers to wind-powered sail. Reverse movement was impossible under sail and the ramming ship could not easily disengage from a sinking victim. Conversion to sail power was accompanied by advances in cannon metallurgy and technology. When rams were discarded as a weapon, hull design and construction changed to maximize the benefit of sail, to lift cannon higher, and to provide storage for powder and ball. The placement of cannons along the ships' broadside altered the chosen axis of attack.  A naval force or ship wanted the enemy bow-on and facing the force/ship's own broadside. When steam replaced sail propulsion, ramming was added back to the tactical repertoire.

So yes ramming was "virtually" removed from naval combat for some time but, the tactic's were still used by pirates. The Brigantine, a form of Brig was used during the early 18th century, the Brigantine represented a compromise between the more powerful classes of ship, such as the frigate and Man O' War, and the faster, but less well-armed schooner and gunboat. A Brigantine bore two masts, and was capable of fielding, on average, twenty-four guns over a single gun deck and the main deck; on top of this, they were fitted with a naval ram. In battle, Brigantine's typically alternated between delivering broadsides and ramming. They could move faster than most ships but could be easily checked by fire barrels.

So what am I asking?

Id like to see ramming implemented into Naval Action.

How would this work?

1. A Brigantine or Brig like ship would be added to the game. 

2. Game mechanics for ramming would have to be implemented as well. This would include what damage would be sustained when hit by a ramming ship at a given speed and angle.

Who gets the ship?

The ships would be readily available for the pirates to build and requiring a blueprint for other nations.

Applying ramming to other ships?

Ramming could be applied to other ships through refits ( adding a visible ram to the front of your ship ) or permanent upgrades ( ram penetration mod, speed mod, etc ).

Why ramming wouldn't be OP?

1. Depending on the angle ( anything less then a T bone does less damage ) if the ramming ship dose not finish you off he is at great risk of stopping / slowing down enough to be boarded or shot at.

2. You can move / angle yourself so that you do not get rammed

Ramming points of interest?

1. A T bone would cause a loss of side armor, hull / crew, and put the ship in shock if hit at a high enough speed.

2. A hit to the stern would cause a loss of stern armor and hull / crew.

3. A hit to the bow would cause a loss of stern armor and hull / crew.

Please give me your feedback and help me continue to research the application of ramming in the 18th century. Also you should help me make ramming a thing in Naval Action so we can see ships split in half.

WASAAAAAAAAA!!!

 

Your suggestion is one of the worst I have seen in these forums in a LONG LONG time.

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8 hours ago, Hodo said:

 

Your suggestion is one of the worst I have seen in these forums in a LONG LONG time.

SO true .. NOw all that said about please please please no rams. I would love the current damage model to be more realistic when a ram happens...   Ie  A ship under Full sail runs into a ship big enough to slow it suddenly.. Sails still full of wind.. BAD things start happening suddenly to masts and spars... Same for running aground at full speed in almost any sailing ship

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