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I have question to all warship experts here. Can you tell me what is the name of this object and the purpose of it?

As you can see in these images below, the objects I'm talking about located near gun turrets in front and rear ship. They have different shape, one is just straight line, other is half circular.

What are they? Also, could you please provide me with the real photographs of those objects? Are they present only in some ship, for example exclusively built for British RN?

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Edited by Oetjoel

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I'm not battleship specialist ^^ But this object exist on many battleships:

8991100401_e64d276e7b_b.jpg

WNUS_16-45_mk6_North_Carolina_guns_pic.j

the-forward-turrets-of-the-battleship-us

 

It seem to be more often located at the front turret, the more exposed at all the sprays and waves from the sea. I guess this is mostly a protection again theses, as they could freeze exposed in cold weathers winds and so probably impair a bit the turret function.

Also, protection from direct erosion over time. Seas were aggressive environments.

Edited by Baggers

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Like Baggers said. It is a shield to deflect waves washing over the decks and prevent flooding the turrets in heavy seas. There is no perfect watertight seal between the turret and mountings, as those are often on heavy duty bearings. Without those shields the turrets would be prone to flooding/water damage.

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Gents,

 

It is indeed a weather stop as has been indicated here. Many ships have them to help protect hydraulics and other interfaces which are prone to significant weather in rough seas; you can also see similar barriers in front of some anchor windlasses and mooring winches.

 

While it does stop direct water flow from a rough wave, it just as importantly helps direct the water that drains away from the deck.

Edited by Sir R. Calder of Southwick

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The destroyer I was on had one and it was very useful as the ship's bows spent a fair amount of time buried in a wave.  I can't see it being quite as useful on a 40k ton Battle wagon, but I guess it can happen. You don't want the water to ram up under the front of the turret.  

IRO0096.jpg

Edited by Angus MacDuff

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Thanks for all the informative replies gents! It is interesting to see that some warship of that era don't have that kind of shield, for example this German super dreadnought

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2 hours ago, Oetjoel said:

Thanks for all the informative replies gents! It is interesting to see that some warship of that era don't have that kind of shield, for example this German super dreadnought

TyoWhSkACURqKuwgHpAu6yW_9GnZq-YxGN7HiaXp

The bow on the bayern class was pretty high, but with the actual deployment of the Bayerns being pretty rare on the North Sea I think the relative quiet of the Baltic and German coast defense didn;t warrant them being installen (yet?). They were commissioned in 1916 after all and spent most of the time moored in port.

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8 hours ago, Kloothommel said:

The bow on the bayern class was pretty high, but with the actual deployment of the Bayerns being pretty rare on the North Sea I think the relative quiet of the Baltic and German coast defense didn;t warrant them being installen (yet?). They were commissioned in 1916 after all and spent most of the time moored in port.

I don't know enough about the Bayern class design history to weigh in specifically, but like everything else on these ships some had excellent sea-keeping qualities anyway.

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Hmmm, looking at the people on Bayern's foc'sle, her bow is really not much higher than the Iroquois', that I displayed above.  I distinctly remember waves rattling the bridge windows on Iroquois.  I think @Kloothommel has the right of it.  No need for a breakwater in the relative calm of the Baltic and the design was probably still evolving.  I think it became standard in later years.  Those gun mounts are not exactly bolted or welded on...basically held down by their own weight (have a look at Bismark on the sea bottom...her guns fell off).  A water ram from below could cause some serious damage.

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