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On May 11, 1865 in Palmito Ranch, Texas, Colonel Theodore Barrett elected to send a detachment of United States Colored Infantry and Texas Cavalry under Lieutenant-Colonel David Branson on a raid. Their mission was to attack a Confederate outpost at White Ranch, destroy their supplies and capture their horses. This was in direct violation of a previously established gentleman's agreement between Federal forces and Rebel forces in Texas. In February, the Union and Confederate forces, recognizing the war was nearly at an end, had agreed to an informal ceasefire. Hitherto May 11, this was recognized by both parties. Why Barrett violated this order is a bit of a mystery. His detractors claimed it was because he wished to seize military glory before the war was over, his supporters claimed it was to resupply by the supplies of the enemy. Regardless of the reason, Barrett was about to join the last battle of America's Civil War.

The movement of Branson's raiding party was delayed until May 12, whereupon the troops at last made their way to the Rebel outpost at White Ranch, only to find it abandoned. the movement, having taken all day and night, exhausted Branson's men. Branson allowed them to rest.

At 8:30, Branson was alerted to Rebel troops, who had made camp at Palmito Ranch. The Rebels had been alerted to the Federal raid (possibly by Rebels or Imperial Mexicans over the border) and were preparing to counter-attack. Branson decided to meet the rebels directly, and so essayed an attack on Palmito Ranch. Branson's men skirmished to Palmito Ranch and then broke the Rebel lines there. Branson's success was short-lived. A larger Confederate force soon made its way to Palmito Ranch and Branson was compelled to retreat to White's Ranch, where he entreated Barrett for reinforcements.

Barrett received word from his beleaguered subordinate and immediately took action. Branson gathered the 200 men of the 34th Indiana and moved quickly for Palmito Ranch.

Barett and the 34th arrived on the morning of May 13, 1865. Like Branson before them, they initially saw success, pushing back the Confederate raiders and finishing the immolation of Rebel supplies begun by Branson the previous day. Having accomplished these goals, Barrett and the 34th began to bivouac. It was then that Confederate Colonel John "Rip" Ford attacked with 200 Confederate Texans. The Federals formed battle lines but, without artillery support, could not hold against Ford's horse artillery. Barrett, recognizing the futility of the Union position, conducted an orderly retreat, keeping up a strong skirmishing line in the process. As the Federals fell back, Union Private John J. Williams was struck and killed. This was his first and only battle. John J. Williams was the last of 750 000 to die in the American Civil War. 100 Union infantrymen were taken prisoner. The Union suffered 12 wounded and 4 captured in addition to their 100 captured men. The Rebels suffered 3 captured and an unsubstantiated number of wounded. No Confederates were recorded as killed.

Officially, the war had been over for 4 days.

The final battle of the American Civil War was an unqualified Confederate victory. It was, by any measure, a pointless and meaningless battle.

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They were immediately paroled so far as I know. Regardless, the Confederate army in Texas surrendered shortly thereafter. The Rebs in Texas were already pretty good about this sort of thing, since Kirby Smith could tell the war was going poorly by 1865 and wanted to position himself as lawful and charitable in the worst case scenario lol. 

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15 minutes ago, Mr. Mercanto said:

Union Private John J. Williams was struck and killed. This was his first and only battle. John J. Williams was the last of 750 000 to die in the American Civil War.

 

15 minutes ago, Mr. Mercanto said:

The final battle of the American Civil War was an unqualified Confederate victory. It was, by any measure, a pointless and meaningless battle

This story has all the makings for a great movie.

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3 hours ago, Mr. Mercanto said:

On May 11, 1865 in Palmito Ranch, Texas, Colonel Theodore Barrett elected to send a detachment of United States Colored Infantry and Texas Cavalry under Lieutenant-Colonel David Branson on a raid. Their mission was to attack a Confederate outpost at White Ranch, destroy their supplies and capture their horses. This was in direct violation of a previously established gentleman's agreement between Federal forces and Rebel forces in Texas. In February, the Union and Confederate forces, recognizing the war was nearly at an end, had agreed to an informal ceasefire. Hitherto May 11, this was recognized by both parties. Why Barrett violated this order is a bit of a mystery. His detractors claimed it was because he wished to seize military glory before the war was over, his supporters claimed it was to resupply by the supplies of the enemy. Regardless of the reason, Barrett was about to join the last battle of America's Civil War.

The movement of Branson's raiding party was delayed until May 12, whereupon the troops at last made their way to the Rebel outpost at White Ranch, only to find it abandoned. the movement, having taken all day and night, exhausted Branson's men. Branson allowed them to rest.

At 8:30, Branson was alerted to Rebel troops, who had made camp at Palmito Ranch. The Rebels had been alerted to the Federal raid (possibly by Rebels or Imperial Mexicans over the border) and were preparing to counter-attack. Branson decided to meet the rebels directly, and so essayed an attack on Palmito Ranch. Branson's men skirmished to Palmito Ranch and then broke the Rebel lines there. Branson's success was short-lived. A larger Confederate force soon made its way to Palmito Ranch and Branson was compelled to retreat to White's Ranch, where he entreated Barrett for reinforcements.

Barrett received word from his beleaguered subordinate and immediately took action. Branson gathered the 200 men of the 34th Indiana and moved quickly for Palmito Ranch.

Barett and the 34th arrived on the morning of May 13, 1865. Like Branson before them, they initially saw success, pushing back the Confederate raiders and finishing the immolation of Rebel supplies begun by Branson the previous day. Having accomplished these goals, Barrett and the 34th began to bivouac. It was then that Confederate Colonel John "Rip" Ford attacked with 200 Confederate Texans. The Federals formed battle lines but, without artillery support, could not hold against Ford's horse artillery. Barrett, recognizing the futility of the Union position, conducted an orderly retreat, keeping up a strong skirmishing line in the process. As the Federals fell back, Union Private John J. Williams was struck and killed. This was his first and only battle. John J. Williams was the last of 750 000 to die in the American Civil War. 100 Union infantrymen were taken prisoner. The Union suffered 12 wounded and 4 captured in addition to their 100 captured men. The Rebels suffered 3 captured and an unsubstantiated number of wounded. No Confederates were recorded as killed.

Officially, the war had been over for 4 days.

The final battle of the American Civil War was an unqualified Confederate victory. It was, by any measure, a pointless and meaningless battle.

Where in Ontario are you from? 

 

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7 hours ago, william1993 said:

why are Canadians doing the US civil war?

Probably for the same reasons the developing team, and a plethora of other national Europeans playing as well.  Though admittedly, some are here just because of the killing aspect, and not so much the actual historical aspect. 

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Thx Mercanto for the history...

----

Fun Fact William...1993.......

More than 40,000 Canadians served in the ACW,, although Canada wasn't formed as a  whole(July 1st.1867 Dominion of Canada) there was upper n lower Canada - Maritime Colonies. (Ontario / Quebec / Maritime Provinces.)                                                                                                                                              There were 7,000 +  volunteers from Canada, all who fought and died for these two sides during the American Civil War 

US Civil War (April 12th 1861 to May 9th, 1865)

Canadian Congressional Medal of Honor Recipients     

I count 27 awarded..

http://www.graysandbluesofmontreal.com/uploads/1/7/5/1/17518121/canadian_moh_winners.pdf

i.e.----John H. Brown..Born 1834 in New Brunswick, Canada.

During the Second Battle of Franklin in Tennessee on 30 November 1864, he took a Confederate Flag for which he was honored with the award on 13 February 1865

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On 2017-5-19 at 4:01 PM, Col_Kelly said:

I enjoy the Civil War because all it's generals are Napoleon wannabees (refer to my profile pic if you need a proof).

Not Grant ;P. In fact he once admitted to knowing next to nothing about Napoleon. Grant made his theory of war on two principles, what worked, and old Zach Taylor. 

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1 hour ago, Col_Kelly said:

In a way this must have been an advantage, lack of 'military education' so to speak (Grant certainly was an educated man) leaves more room to innovation. 

Grant was well educated in the Art of War. Also a lot of ACW officers n men knew Napoleon Tactics were out dated... The wheels of Military Tactics n Movements do Lag behind Battlefield Technology(Rifled Guns/ammo/ranges/movements). Grant was a believer still of massing men to take a position....a war of attrition...which the South could not win..       ------------------------

 Grant began his military career as a cadet at the West Point military academy in 1839. After graduation he went on to serve with distinction as a lieutenant in the Mexican–American War. Grant was a keen observer of the war and learned battle strategies serving under Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. ......... snip ....Maj. Gen. John C. Frémont, who viewed in Grant an "iron will" to win, appointed Grant to commander of the District of Cairo. Grant became famous around the nation after capturing Fort Donelson in February 1862

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ulysses_S._Grant_and_the_American_Civil_War

 

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On 2017-5-22 at 2:04 PM, Col_Kelly said:

In a way this must have been an advantage, lack of 'military education' so to speak (Grant certainly was an educated man) leaves more room to innovation. 

Some historians have actually argued this exact point! John Keegan most notably in, "A Military History of the American Civil War." I more or less concur, Col_Kelly :). Grant's campaign against Vicksburg violated several laws of contemporary warfare, all of which Grant had little interest in. The result was one of the most extraordinary campaigns in US military history. 

Grant made his own rules as he went. He just had a nose for war. Theory was of little interest to him, as its practical application was natural to his sensibilities. Sun Tzu wrote a treatise on the "Art of War." Grant was content to summarize his theory on "the Art" as "Find the enemy as fast as you can. Get at him as quick as you can. Hit him as hard as you can, and keep moving forward." 

As James McPherson put it, "Grant made it look easy."

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Yeah I always found that quote puzzling, especially since what I consider to be his two best moves (Vicksburg campaign and his feint against the ANV at the beginning of the Overland) don't really respect that logic : in both cases he avoids direct contact to get in an advantageous position. In what context did he say that btw ? Seems like he was trying to make it look easy indeed.

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