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Spanish ship plans (rare scans)


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  • 6 months later...

Well, in order to support this nice scans, let me contribute with some infomation that is required for reading the plans.

 

Spanish Ship building units by time period:

 

Before 1590:

Traditional units depending on the construction place.

 

1590-1750:

Royal yards regulation (5/20/1590)

Base unit: "Codo de ribera" or "Real"= 0.5747m

Divisions:

1/2 Codo de Ribera= 1 pie de ribera= 0.2873m  (Pie is the word for foot)

12 pulgadas de ribera= 1 pie de ribera (pulgada means inch)

 

1750- until metric system adoption

Royal bylaw 7/25/1750

Base unit: "Vara Castella" or "Vara de Burgos"= 0.8359m

Divisions:

12 Pie de Burgos= 1 Vara Castellana: 1 Pie de Burgos (PdB)= 0.2783m

12 Pulgadas= 1 PdB (Note that the name is the same, but this inch is different than that defined above)

 

Tonnage = 8 cubic Codos= 1 Ton.

1 Ton= 1.518 m³

Only around the end of XVIII tonnage starts to be related to displacement. Along the whole period covered by the game, tonnage measures the cargo capacity in "barrels" of 8 cubic "codos" once different formulas (regulated by the Kingdom rules)  had been applied in order to account for the ship's shape.

 

Note that the spanish word for barrel is "TONEL", and that Tonelada means "joint of barrels". The word Ton is a derivation of the Spanish measurement unit for ships cargo capacity.

 

At the scale drawn at the plans, each square means 1 foot, but the measurement of that "foot" will depend on the publication date of the plans.

 

Regards

Edited by IonAguirre
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Check this link:

 

http://es.slideshare.net/egtorralba/las-fragatas-de-vela-de-la-armada-espanola-1650-1853-su-evolucin-tcnica

 

It goes to a book about the evolution of frigates design along time at Spain. From page 320 on ... the Frgate "Diana", the one at the portrait, is described in detail.

 

The book includes lots of plans, technical data, original seatrials, ..... related to many spanish frigates.

Edited by IonAguirre
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