Jump to content
Game-Labs Forum

Recommended Posts

We plan to have to have 2 types of that ship

 

1) McKay drawings body (with spanker boom) - more sturdy, less agile and speedy

2) Original (without spanker boom) snow rigged - more agile, and built for speed

 

can you please provide us with drawings or refs for the sailplan these 2 ships should have?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think the John Mckay sail plan exists. Ive abused every word, image, and setting in google search and found nothing. It appears one modeller even had to guess the dimensions. :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A snow is essentially a brig, but with a small mast just aft of the mainmast, and terminating at the main truck (sometimes the 'mast' was just a stout cable instead of a wooden spar).  The overall proportions would be very similar to a brig, but with a small gap (iirc, usually 6-18 inches) between the luff of the spanker (aka snow sail) and the main mast.  This additional gap allowed some air flow through that made allow a coarse sail to be set on the main yard.  This improved downwin and broad reaching performance, but it also meant that the rig would cost more to build and maintain, as well as require additional sailors.

 

se-Polli.jpg

fig2.png

Brig_Niagara_full_sail.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Best I can find is this on the subject:

wxGW8CQ.png

ZFOZ5Fq.png

 

These are drawings from 'Legend of The Lake' by Arthur Britton Smith. I'm not sure where his research took him to arrive at these plans, but hey ho. Google can only tell you so much.

 

Hope this helps o7

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does anyone know which was more common: a snow mast or a horse?

Do you have a picture of a horse? It's one of those terms that's impossible to look up on the internet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Do you have a picture of a horse? It's one of those terms that's impossible to look up on the internet.

a horse shoe that is around the mast like a clap with ball bearings? doesnt our lynx have these?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

i'm a landlubber dont ask me such things

parrel.jpg

400_F_9120457_Qp8SuqXgFNy1KOcADOjI45xGnT

 

atleast that is the only thing that comes to my mind when he says Horse

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, collectively that's called a parrel. Definitely more common than a snow mast, which is only used larger vessels with smaller mizzen sails.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maturin, a 'horse' can refer to several things, and crops up every now and again in slightly odd situations (local vernacular), but tends to mean one of three things:

 

1) Sheet horse - a stout line or solid bar that allows the sheeting point on deck to freely travel athwartships, normally so the sheet itself can be left unattended whilst tacking. Commonly found on shorthand working vessels - Thames barges being a perfect example with horses for both main and stays'l sheets commonly used. #125 below.

 

post-289-0-56067000-1365998497.jpg

 

post-289-0-25476100-1365998579.jpg

 

2) Flemish Horse - a seperate footrope for the yardarm, as otherwise the footrope would be too close under the yard to be useable:

flemish-horse-580.jpg?itok=HIeGd7xa

 

3) Dead horse - Having been paid a month's advance, for example, after a month into the voyage a sailor would be said to have worked off his horse, or that his horse was dead. Not sure why, best I've come across is that a sailor's advance often slipped straight through his hands to creditors, boarding-house masters etc, and so for the first month of a trip all his pay was going to support them ashore and only afterwards would his pay be his own. As such a sailor could feel he supported those ashore as a horse its rider. In the 'Golden Age' the end of the first month was marked by a big celebration, including the making and discarding overboard of an effigy of either a horse or a ragged man to the singing of 'Poor Old Horse'. Stan Hugill said that by his time the whole affair was very lackluster, if done at all.

 

Neigh.

 

Baggy

 

ps. I think Cochrane may be referring to a cable that the luff would run up, as opposed to a spar - a snow horse rather than a snow mast. I think...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...