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Found 7 results

  1. History Fama was the flagship of the last great Admiral of the Venetian Republic Angelo Emo, who captained the ship during his continuous missions hunting down Barbary pirate including the siege of Tunis in 1785. Angelo Praised Fama for her considerable speed and agility naming the ship as comfortably the best Venice had. The plans for Fama were drawn up in 1782 and 6 ships were laid, of which 5 were completed she was constructed in the Venetian Arsenal by Giovanni Domenico Giacomazzi, who was considered the best venetian shipwright in of his time and built accordingly the "ad ordinata doppia" system which was implement in 1780 by Angelo Emo who after studying the construction techniques used by the English and the French, hoped to match them or even surpass them. Fama herself spent most of her career in active service, either stationed off of Corfu with the main detachment of the Venetian navy, ready to face threats from threats to the mouth of the Adriatic by the Ottomans or other hostile nations or spent hunting Pirates over the Mediterranean or Barbary Coast. Fama was captured alongside the rest of the Venetian fleet by Napoleon in 1797 when she was briefly renamed Renomee and then renamed again to Du Blois a month later. After her capture she was sailed to Tulon where she was rearmed with slightly smaller guns to fit French standards to take part in Napoleon's Egyptian expedition where she unfortunately collided with the French flagship "L'Orient", suffering severe damage. Despite her damage she remained to Alexandria and was used as headquarters by General Kleber was later partially sunk to block the entrance into Alexandria, she was then captured by the British and sadly broken up without the French, nor British ever realising her potential as a swift and powerful shock ship or as a strong commerce escort and pirate hunter. The Fama Class were given heavy armaments to match larger capital ships but maintaining the speed, versatility and agility of a frigate, thus the name Fregata Grossa came about, translating to Large Frigate, The ideas behind the Fregata Grossa rated ships were to hit hard and fast, able to set combat to their own advantage the theory was a cross between their contemporary super frigates and modern battlecruisers. They also contain similar thoughts used in the huge super frigates of the later 19th century but obviously without the steam engines to power them. The 6 Ships of the Fama Class were: Fama (1784) Gloria Veneta (1794) Le Stengel (1797) Le Beyrand (1797) Diamante (1797) Unnamed (uncompleted) Fama and Gloria Veneta both served under the Venetian Republic with considerable distinction. The other ships of the class were completed during the French and Austrian Occupation periods. Le Stengal and Beyrand both served briefly in the Napoleonic fleet and were then transferred to Austria as part of the peace deal. Diamante was badly damaged during the French Looting period and was patched up but sailed poorly, to deal with this she was armed from head to toe with 24lb guns and used as a floating battery, later she was repaired and served in the Austrian navy as a troop transport ship. A further Unnamed ship of the class was laid but damaged beyond salvation and was sadly broken up with parts being used to outfit other ships but mostly used as firewood. Fama well represents the Venetian Naval doctrine of the time, Venice continuing to fight with a hybrid fleet of Galeass, Galleys and Frigates, due to the history and nature of what remained of the Venetian Empire. Her outfitting, speed and manoeuvrability made her a great shock ship with a strong punch, able to hunt down pirates and operate well in shallow waters and archipelagos with complex coastlines. She is also incredibly well suited for the calm waters of the Mediterranean and able to produce good speed no matter the wind conditions. She was praised for her sailworthiness by her captains and considered the jewel in the late Venetian Fleet. Details Fama was considered a Secondo Rango Fregata Grossa within the Venetian Fleet, then after she was captured by the French she was reclassified as a 3rd rate, although if she were in the game she would likely be similarly placed as Agamemnon, among the 4th rates. Her measurements are (peidi are the Venetian feet): Total Length: 138 piedi or 48.00 meters Keel: 122 piedi or 42.42 meters Width: 37 piedi or 12.86 meters Draft: 17.5 piedi or 6.08 meters (when under French service: 16 fore, 18ft aft (5.2-5.85m)) Bilge Tip (height between the keel and deck): 28 piedi or 9.73m She was crewed by around 450-500 men, depending on how many sailors Venice could muster at the time. The Venetian state had a continuous issue with raising the appropriate number of men to serve on her navies during the later years of the republic. Fama had similar crew numbers to her contemporary 64s by other navies, however due to her smaller size these men served in even more cramp conditions than was generally experienced by the worlds navies, her officers quarters were equally as confined, especially considering that she was used for most of her career as an admiral's flagship, although these close natured lodgings were something the Venetians were always used to back at home in Venice. She sailed incredibly well and was praised for being hugely fast and agile, giving her the best ability to perform her main tasks, protecting merchant shipping and hunting down pirates. Her performance under sail is fairly well documented, receiving universal commendation from the officers who sailed her. I have not yet found any information about how she heeled, rolled and other similar specifics, as Venice had no sailing queries similar to the Royal Navy. Armaments Fama Carried 66 Guns, and her four chasers, below is a make up of weight and armaments during both the French and Venetian outfitting. She also had the potential to point the two cannons nearest the bow on the main gun deck in a forwards direction to aid the 2 dedicated chase guns situated either side of the foremast and 2 rear facing guns. During Venetian period by Venetian Weight 26 x 40lb (26.5 British pounds) (12.04 kg) 26 x 30lb (20 British pounds) (9.03 kg) 14 x 14lb (9 British pounds) (4.21 kg) 2x 14lb (9 British lb) Bow Chasers (4.21 kg) 2x 14lb (9 British lb) Stern Chasers (4.21 kg) Broadside Weight = 1008 Venetian Pounds (667.5 British Pounds) (303.4 kg) French Period By French Weight (reduced to a 64) 26 x 24lb (11.74 kg) 26 x 18lb (8.8 kg) 12 x 6lb (2.93 kg) 2 x 6lb Bow Chasers (2.93 kg) 2 x 6lb Stern Chasers (2.93 kg) Broadside Weight = 588 French Pound (634.75 British Pounds) (287.5kg) Plans The most true plans, showing the proper lines of of either La Fama or Gloria Veneta, as said below in a post stating the edit history of this thread. This is the only record showing the proper 66 broadside gun ports, although the plan below does miss her bow chasers. The other plans like with her sister ship Stengel show the correct lines, but sadly show incorrect positioning for the guns on the quarterdeck, the other plans show only 6 guns either side (12 in total) from when she was reduced to a 64 rather than the true build when she had 7 (14), which are shown correctly here. This is a modern reproduction by Guido Ercole, there are a couple of minor mistakes where she is shown having 28 guns, not her proper 26 on both her gun decks, she is also missing a gun on her weather deck. The rest of the reproduction is still accurate, with the sail plan and also shows a nice idea of what she would have looked like painted. Some less detailed plans, most likely showing Stengel, after she has one of her weather deck gun ports removed making her into a 64. Rough Planking and Framing Methods used Art Many Thanks go to Sella22 for letting me use some of his resources, I would really love to see this ship in the game, she would be a fantastic addition. Thank you for Reading.
  2. WiP Well i took the initiative to make LeBoiteux's idea into reality.A thread which contains all the venetian/italian ship in the forums. Unnamed Venetian 22-gun corvette XVIII-th century Books: Title:Duri i banchi! Le navi della Serenissima 421-1797 Author:Guido Ercole Link: http://www.amazon.it/Duri-banchi-della-Serenissima-421-1797/dp/8890251107 Title:Vascelli e fregate della Serenissima. Navi di linea della Marina veneziana 1652-1797 Author:Guido Ercole Link:http://www.amazon.it/Vascelli-fregate-Serenissima-veneziana-1652-1797/dp/8890565144/ref=pd_rhf_dp_p_img_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=10SB0B1PBW7848V5AFN2 Title:Navi veneziane-Venetian ships Author:Gilberto Penzo Link:http://www.amazon.fr/Navi-veneziane-Venetian-ships-Gilberto-Penzo/dp/888190103X/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1445631636&sr=8-2&keywords=navi+veneziane Title:Vele italiane della costa occidentale Author:Edoardo Guerrieri and Sergio Bellabarba Link:http://www.amazon.com/Vele-italiane-della-costa-occidentale/dp/8820348330/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1447246313&sr=1-1&keywords=Vele+italiane+della+costa+occidentale&pebp=1447246318873&perid=01XM9109D3YKGFF909JD About the book:http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/6156-vele-italiane-della-costa-occidentale/ Title:VENEZIA '800: BUFERA IN ARSENALE La Marina veneziana nel ventennio napoleonico (1796-1815) Author:Guido Ercole Link:http://milistoria.it/Apps/WebObjects/Milistoria.woa/wa/XDirectAction/viewProduct?id=95690〈=ita Title:Navi veneziane-Venetian ships Author:Gilberto Penzo Link:https://www.amazon.co.uk/Navi-veneziane-Venetian-ships-Gilberto-Penzo/dp/888190103X/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1467971663&sr=8-3&keywords=venetian+ships More sources: More detailed plans:http://www.internetculturale.it/opencms/opencms/it/ricercaMag.jsp?searchType=avanzato&q=&opCha__creator=AND&channel__creator=&opCha__title=AND&channel__title=&opCha__contributor=AND&channel__contributor=&opCha__issuedYear=AND&channel__issuedYear_from=&channel__issuedYear_until=&opCha__publisher=AND&channel__publisher=&opCha__subject=AND&channel__subject=&opCha__language=AND+OR&opCha__typeTipo=AND+OR&opCha__typeLivello=AND&channel__typeLivello=&opCha__typeDigitale=AND+OR&opCha__location=AND&channel__location=&opCha__collectionText=AND&channel__collectionText=Disegni+navali&opCha__agency=AND+OR&opCha__descSourceLevel2=AND+OR&imageField2.x=11&imageField2.y=6 http://www.internetculturale.it/opencms/opencms/it/collezioni/collezione_0083.html http://3decks.pbworks.com/w/page/916144/Venetian%20Large%20Frigates http://nuke.gmtmodellismo.it/ILIBRI/NAVISTORIAEMODELLISMO/VASCELLIEFREGATEDELLASERENISSIMA/tabid/369/Default.aspx http://www.veneziamuseo.it/ARSENAL/schede_arsenal/fregate.htm http://www.modellismo.net/forum/recensione-libri-e-articoli/105840-vascelli-e-fregate-della-serenissima.html http://www.veniceboats.com/das-erbe-der-serenissima.htm http://www.modellismo.net/forum/recensione-libri-e-articoli/105863-duri-i-banchi-le-navi-della-serenissima-421-1797-a.html http://koti.mbnet.fi/felipe/html/ships_1667-1797.html Credit goes to all of the people that found the info/plans/drawings and posted them in the respective threads.I only put them together in a single thread. Feel free to contribute!
  3. Le Muiron Venetian/French frigate 44 guns 1797 Her history: Muiron was a frigate of the French Navy, famous for ferrying Bonaparte on the 22 August 1799 under the flagship of Admiral Ganteaume from Egypt to France after the Battle of the Nile. The Muiron was one of two 18-pounder armed frigates that were building on the stocks in Venice in November 1796, when Bonaparte took Venice during the Campaign of Italy. The two frigates were launched in August 1797 under the names Carrère and Muiron, and completed during November by the orders of Pierre-Alexandre Forfait. Muiron was named to honour Colonel Jean-Baptiste Muiron, an aide-de-camp of Bonaparte who had covered Bonaparte with his body during the Battle of the Bridge of Arcole. The Muiron was armed with 28 × 18-pounder guns on the upper deck, and 12 × 6-pounder guns on the quarterdeck and forecastle, and manned with a complement of 340. She was incorporated in the fleet that invaded Egypt, and after the Battle of the Nile, Bonaparte departed for France aboard. She later took part in the Battle of Algeciras Bay. In 1807, Napoleon ordered that the Muiron be preserved as a monument; to this effect, he wrote a letter to the Ministry of the Navy, stating "I wish that the Muiron on which I came back from Egypt be kept as a monument and placed in such a way that it be preserved, if possibly, several hundreds years". She was repaired and docked in Toulon, which a golden inscription on her hull stating: "The Muiron, taken in 1797 in Venice arsenal by the conqueror of Italy. She brought back the saviour of France from Egypt in 1799". Napoléon also had a finely crafted scale model made for his study in Malmaison in 1803. This model is now on display at the Musée national de la Marine in Paris. At the Bourbon Restoration, Muiron was decommissioned, and she was eventually destroyed in 1850, in circumstances that remain unclear. Conflicting theories have it that she was either sold for material and broken up, or destroyed by fire after being struck by lightning. The British captured her sister ship in August 1801 and added her to the British Navy as HMS Carrere. Dimensions: (in venetian piedi 1 Venetian piede = 0,3 meter = 12 inches): 135'6" x 35'6" x 19' Length of Gundeck: 150' 10" Imperial Feet or 45.72 meters Length of Keel: 122' 3 ½" Imperial Feet or 37.1983 meters Depth of Hold: 12' 9" Imperial Feet or 3.6576 meters Breadth: 39' 5 ½" Imperial Feet or 11.8999 meters Burthen: 1,012 74⁄94 Tons BM Armament: 28 x 18 pounder 16 x 6 pounder Plans(from Vascelli e fregate della Serenissima. Navi di linea della Marina veneziana 1652-1797 http://www.amazon.it/Vascelli-fregate-Serenissima-veneziana-1652-1797/dp/8890565144/ref=pd_rhf_dp_p_img_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=10SB0B1PBW7848V5AFN2): Muiron's sistership: Carrere 38/44 guns 1797 History: Carrère was a French frigate that served briefly in the French navy before the British captured her in 1801, naming her HMS Carrere. She seems never to have seen any meaningful active duty after her capture as she was laid up in 1802 and finally sold in 1814. Carrère was one of two 38-gun frigates that were building on the stocks in Venice in May 1797, when Napoleon took the city during the Campaign of Italy. Pierre-Alexandre Forfait ordered the two frigates completed, which they were in August 1797 under the names Carrère and Muiron. The French named Carrère after an esteemed artillery colonel who had fallen at Unzmarkt fighting the Austrians. Carrère and Muiron both served during the French invasion of Egypt in 1798. They then accompanied Napoleon on his return to France after the failure of that campaign. The captain of the Carrère was Commodore Pierre Dumanoir le Pelley, and with him travelled generals Lannes, Murat, and Marmont. The British Pomone of 48 guns, in company with Phoenix and Pearl, captured Carrère near Elba on 3 August 1801 after a short fight. She was escorting a small convoy from Porto Ercole to Porto Longone during the Siege of Porto Ferrajo. Pomone lost two men killed and four wounded, of whom two died later. The French casualty list was not initially available. The Royal Navy took her in as HMS Carrere, but rated at 36 guns. Frederick Lewis Maitland was her first captain. He sailed her to Portsmouth, where she arrived on 24 September 1802. Carrère's active duty career in the Royal Navy was short. She was paid off on 4 October 1802 and then laid up in ordinary. She was sold on 1 September 1814. The purchasers had to post a bond of £3000 that they would not sell or otherwise dispose of her but would break her up within 12 months from the day of sale. Dimensions: Same as above Armament: (French Service): Upper Gun Deck: 28 × 18-pounder guns Quarterdeck: 12 brass x 8-pounder guns + 2 x 36-pounder obusiers Forecastle: 2 x 36-pounder obusiers (British service): Upper Gun Deck: 28 x British 18-Pounder Quarterdeck: 10 x British 32-Pound Carronade Quarterdeck: 2 x British 9-Pounder Forecastle: 2 x British 32-Pound Carronade Forecastle: 2 x British 9-Pounder Crew: French service: 356 British service: 340 (352) Sources: Vascelli e fregate della Serenissima. Navi di linea della Marina veneziana 1652-1797 http://www.amazon.it/Vascelli-fregate-Serenissima-veneziana-1652-1797/dp/8890565144/ref=pd_rhf_dp_p_img_1?ie=UTF8&refRID=10SB0B1PBW7848V5AFN2 http://mnm.webmuseo.com/ws/musee-national-marine/app/collection/record/9030 http://www.delcampe.net/page/item/id,135327174,var,militaria%3Dlivre-de-construction-du-3macirc%3Bts-la-freacute%3Bgate-le-muiron-avec-ces-plans-dorigines-1933,language,E.html http://forummarine.forumactif.com/t3001-la-fregate-la-muiron-1797-1850 https://troisponts.wordpress.com/2011/09/26/la-fregate-la-muiron/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Carrere_(1801) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_frigate_Muiron Thank you LeBoiteux and Fluffy Fishy!
  4. The "1780" Class ship was a 70/74 gun Venetian Primo Rango (1st Rate) designed in 1780 by the architects Andrea Paresi, Andrea Chiribiri, Andrea Spadon and Iseppo Fonda as part of Angelo Emo's naval reform program started the same year. The ship was drawn up as a replacement for both the previous 70 gun Leon Trionfante class and the smaller 66 gun San Carlo Borromeo class which the two designs had been in service 64 and 39 years respectively. The "1780" was designed with the intention to being faster, more agile and tougher than its predecessors, in line with the contemporary naval thought under the Emo reforms which were focussed on modernising and changing the way the Venetian navy operated to best protect its mercantile interests, and to project Venetian naval power against its main threats from the Barbary States and Ottomans. The new "1780"s were the first major ship planned as part of these reforms, 4 were laid, however none were completed before Venice was occupied by France, then Austria. The 4 ships of the "1780 class" Laharpe, 70 guns, Laid in 1782, Completed by the French in 1797. Unnamed, 74 guns, Laid in 1786, Damaged by the French looting in 1797, Demolished by the Austrians in 1804. Unnamed, 74 guns Laid in 1790, Damaged by the French looting in 1797, Demolished by the Austrians in 1804. Unnamed, 74 guns, Laid in 1790, Damaged by the French looting in 1797, Demolished by the Austrians in 1802. Laharpe was named in honour of Amédée Emmanuel François Laharpe, a French Major General who was accidentally killed by a friendly fire mistake during Napoleon's Italian campaign in 1796 while he was pursuing Austrian forces in the town of Codogno. She was launched alongside the Fama class ship Stengel, as part of the French salvage programme launched in the Venetian Arsenal following their occupation in 1797, the design was modified slightly, taking away the poop deck and her 3 guns, while adding another gun port to the quarterdeck, leaving her as a 70 gun ship, instead of the originally intended 74. Laharpe spent the majority of her early years stationed at the French base in Ancona alongside Stengel, ironically the two classes serving together as they were designed and intended for by Angelo Emo in the 1780s. They were soon joined by Beyrand, another Fama class ship where they were prepared and sent on an expedition to relieve the siege of Corfu against the Russo-Turkish aggressors, however the small navy were forced to turn back after being spotted by the Austrian navy. The Austrian navy gave chase in an attempt to capture the three ships but were no match for the speed of the Venetian designs and Laharpe, Beyrand and Stengel made it safely back to Ancona, where she would stay until 1799. In 1799 Austrian Forces captured Ancona and Laharpe was taken back to Venice to help secure the Austrian occupation, she spent the next 3 years anchored in the Grand Canal, working as a floating outpost for the occupying Austrians, where she served as a powerful reminder and keeper of peace against the Venetian resistance. After her years serving as an outpost she was commanded by Karl Ludwig Johann Josef Lorenz (later Archduke Charles of Austria) to be converted into a prison ship, as the prisons of Venice were in a state of disrepair and prisoners were frequently escaping and so in december 1802 work began to refit Laharpe. After her refit, finishing in the spring of 1803 she was anchored in the San Marco Canal where she stayed until July 1804, where she underwent some maintenance, after which she was left anchored in the part of the Venetian Arsenal known as the "Novissima Grande", the largest basin of the complex until the second French occupation starting in 1806, she stayed in the Arsenal for a further 3 years and was eventually demolished there in 1809. Below is A painting of of Laharpe serving as a prison ship. Measurements: Length of Keel, 139 piedi, (48.33m) Length at Longest Point, 162 piedi, (56.33m) Width at Widest Point, 39 piedi, (13.56m) Armaments (Laharpe 70 Guns): 28 x 24lb (French pounds) 28 x 18lb (French pounds) 14 x 8lb (French pounds) Plans: Originals. Reproduction by Guido Ercole. Thanks For reading, I hope you enjoyed, as always let me know if anyone wants some more information.
  5. With the other proposed sets of kick starter packs being thrown about I thought I might make my turn to do a Venetian one, mainly with the aim of providing some things that are a little bit different to what we already have and what the other proposed packs are offering. I will also start by saying that these are my personal suggestions after a good think, if there is a ship that is missing from this group I would more than gladly discuss swapping a ship or adding any others. Polacca (c1750) Adding a Polacca to the game gives the devs two nice options, one they can have a new small fighting, and two they can also use the same model for a trade Polacca as has been done with the other trade ships, the trade brig for example. Polacca were used quite extensively by Venice as both a small escort ship and as a trade ship itself, they are nimble and sail fairly well up and down wind, their real advantage however is their ability to deter boarding, their high sides being a great advantage in this situation when being attacked by their main enemies, the North African Barbary Pirates. There is also a nice advantage in that there is a purchasable scale model produced by Amati. Sciabecco (18th Century) The devs have toyed with the idea of adding a Xebec for a while now, I just thought it might be fun to throw in a detailed plan of what formed the back bone for the Venetian fleets activities in home waters, this is a 34 gun variant built to mainly operate in the coastal waters of the Venetian Lagoon and the Dalmatia, this style of Xebec would add some flair and variety to fighting in shallow waters. Historically the day to day activities of these ships were to discourage illegal activity and protect higher value trading convoys. I also have a sail map for a similar vessel if anyone is interested. Muiron (1797) I had a long think over whether to include Muiron or rather go for her parent, the Palma class (1784) but I decided to go for Murion, mainly due to the importance Muiron played in breaking through the British blockade of Egypt, inevitably saving Napoleon from capture or death after the battle of the Nile. Napoleon also wished Muiron to be preserved eternally as thanks for his safety and so it would be a nice little tribute to him to do so electronically in the game. For further information please see the dedicated post to her by @Sella22, I will post a link below. Fama (1784) I have personally worked long and hard on trying to unravel the history of the Fama class and have given at least a brief history for each of the 6 ships built, it would be a dream come true to be able to sail her in game. I have explained before my reasons for adding her when it comes to adding Fama, as the swan song of the Venetian Republic's shipbuilding she was the last and most heavily armed of the Fregata Grossa class, the Venetian line of super frigates dating back to the 1720s. She would be a fantastic ship to see in game, not at least to offer some alternative to the Agamemnon dominance of 4th rate battles. She is beautiful, charismatic and historic, her various sisters serving in the Venetian, French and Austrian navy, and as my signature suggests, she is the one I would be most happy to see. Link below to dedicated thread. Bonus: I would love to see either of these ships added on to the pack but when it comes down to the cost of ship development I would much rather see the others added over the two below. Leon Trionfante (1716) The Leon Trionfante is a ship I have discussed before, the main reason I like her is she has such a long history as a ship, serving her users well for over 100 years and taking part in multiple conflicts, as the ship is more of a bonus choice I wont go into huge detail of why I would like to see her, if you wish to read more please visit her own thread. I also like her because she offers a smaller alternative to a 3rd rate, being armed with 70 guns. Or "1780"/La Harpe The 1780 is the other of my bonus choices, my less favourite over the Leon Trionfante, mostly due to her relatively short history. I just like her design really, she would, like Leon Trionfante be a nice offering to give as another compact 3rd rate, but unlike Leon Trionfante was capable of being armed with 74 guns, which again gives a nice little option to take over the current crop we have of the 3rd and the Bellona. Links to more information: Thank you for reading I hope you can find some time to support this proposed pack
  6. Introduction Leon Trionfante at 70 guns was one of the largest and most successful ship classes in the late Venetian navy. The Leon Trionfante class has an impressive history of use serving both in the Venetian and later the French navy over an impressive time span of 109 years between 1716 to 1825, serving in the Second Morean war, The Venetian Tunisian war and the Napoleonic Wars. The long service history is in part due to the way the Venetian government was operating its navy in the last century of the republic of Venice, partly due to the design being ahead of its time but also in part due to the poor success of the following San Carlo Borromeo Class. The Leon Trionfante, as the nameship of her class was first designed and laid by Francesco da Ponte di Angelo in 1714 as a one of a kind to move the Venetian navy on from the much more contemporary design shown in the San Lorenzo Zustinian Class (1690) and after the Venetian State had decided that the Corona, another one off design for a 74 drawn up in 1711 was deemed to expensive in terms of both production and maintenance. History Leon Trionfante was born into a particularly unstable time frame the as long standing hostilities between Venice and the Ottomans had broken into the 7th and final Venetian Ottoman war (1714-1718), also known as The Second Morean War. Her launch in July was immediately followed by a rush to join up with the rest of the Venetian fleet which was currently in a sticky predicament facing a larger Ottoman fleet with far more firepower off the coast of Corfu in the Ionian sea. The island of Corfu was of considerable importance to Venice, seen as the eye to the Adriatic, the core of the Venetian maritime commerce and territory, the Venetian state had outlined that Corfu must be kept at all costs, Corfu also offered the largest Venetian naval base outside of Venice. The Ottomans had been putting Corfu under considerable pressure since 1715, forcing the Venetian Navy to shadow the Turkish fleet. On the 8th of July the Ottomans landed a considerable land force of 33,000 men on Corfu, The Venetian navy hassled them during their deployment but the battle remained indecisive. Leon Trionfante reached the rest of the Venetian fleet on the 10th of July accompanying two troop ships, prompting a morale boost for the Venetians and resulting in a daring plan which resulted in the superior Venetian seamanship giving them a considerable positioning advantage over the Turks. The siege collapsed in August following a mighty storm which caused considerable damage to the Ottoman fleet but was weathered with little damage to the better positioned Venetian Fleet, costing the Ottomans a humiliating defeat and withdrawal. After the storm and defeat on Corfu the Ottoman ships limped home and the Turkish started to pursue a more land based campaign, this in turn aggravated the Autrians into a simultaneous conflict started in 1716. The conflict was also expanded on with the formation of a new Papal coalition against the ottomans, with The Holy League of 1717, resulting in naval reinforcements from Portugal, The Papal States and Maltese Knights. With the support of this holy league Venice became more assertive and set sail from Corfu towards the Dardanelles with the aim of cutting off the Ottoman Fleet. The result of this maneuvering was a confrontation in the northern Aegean between the 26 ships of the Venetian Fleet and the 44 Ottoman ships, which were also larger than their Venetian counterparts. The resulting battle left 6 Ottoman ships and the Venetian ship Columba badly damaged, the results are considered indecisive but a Venetian tactical victory. A month later, the Holy league Fleet had combined and continued to press against Ottoman interests, and on the 19th of July the two forces clashed again at the Battle of Matapan, where the larger Allied fleet of smaller ships inflicted a crushing victory over the Ottoman Fleet including significant damage to the huge ottoman flagship, the 114 gun Kebir Üç Ambarlı. A year later the Venetian fleet engaged the Ottomans in the second Battle of Matapan, resulting in the Ottoman navy being reduced to an insignificant threat and the two sides finding a peace deal. During this conflict, these 3 battles and the maneuvering at Corfu gave Leon Trionfante a considerable name for itself, continuing to serve the Venetian navy until she was broken up in 1740, having vastly outperformed the now outdated San Lorenzo Zustinian ships in war and peace. However, despite the combative success during the Second Morean War, the Venetian state chose to maintain their building program of the San Lorenzo class due to the efficiency bonus given to it being well known to the craftsmen and suppliers of the Arsenal. Following the end to the Second Morean war we see more interest being shown in Leon Trionfante and over the next 20 years the Venetian state ordered several more ships, with a considerable program being launched in 1719, another in mid 1720s and a third during the 1730s, however none of these ships were launched before 1761. In each of these 3 programs the design was adjusted slightly, with little tweaks here and there, mainly resulting in fairly insignificant changes to the length of the ship. The long build periods were a common thing in Venice, the practice of covered dry docks and stable climate allowed long construction times and ships tended to only be added to during prosperous or troubled periods where the state could afford or was forced to pay for ship construction. The progress was also somewhat delayed by the new San Carlo Borromeo class, which was conceived in 1741, with the name ship being launched in 1750. The San Carlo Borromeo class, whilst being technically a more modern class was somewhat backwards when compared to Leon Trionfante, she was also armed with 4 fewer guns. The San Carlos took a more more conservative approach to ship design with a lot of inspiration from the now wholly outdated San Lorenzo class, in total 6 were ordered. However during the late 1750s Venice began a series of sea trials off the coast of Portugal looking into how their navy coped in the rougher Atlantic waters. The San Carlo Borromeo was noted for performing poorly, the ship was unable to keep any significant speed and when she was sailed hard she became both unstable and started to damage herself in the large waves, The ship was deemed unsafe and had to be rescued by a Galleass captained by the young Angelo Emo, being towed back to port, barely staying afloat. It was now decided that the two most complete ships from the Leon Trionfante program were to be launched, following their launch in 1761 the sea trials continued, the two new ships, San Giacomo and Buon Consiglio performing excellently in all areas, the results of these sea trials was the relative scrapping of the San Carlo program with the resumption of building the Leon Trionfante. As Venice continued to invest into the class the Independence movement started to draw the eyes of the European power westwards, resulting in lax Mediterranean shipping security and the rise of piracy in north Africa. the new ships of the Leon Trionfante class became increasingly popular as escorts to merchant convoys and as tensions rose became increasingly important in deterring pirates, however their size and speed made them unable to chase down or offer any real threat to the fast Barbary ships, to combat Venice began a modernisation process resulting in better construction methods and faster ships, and while a new ship, the "1780" was planned to replace the Leon Trionfante class this new design never saw a completed ship under the republic, in part because the Leon Trionfante class was still performing its role well after over 60 years of service at this point. As tensions rose and the break out of a full scale conflict between the Bey of Tunis and Venice in 1784, the Leon Trionfante ships would see considerable service during this war, while it was unable to chase down the smaller faster Tunisian ships it offered considerable firepower and the ships were used extensively in the bombardment and destruction of Tunisian harbors. after the cessation of conflict in 1790 with Angelo Emo's death the Venetian state became short of funds and their navy began to shrink down but the Leon Trionfante class continued to serve until the end of the republic in 1797 Following the Annexation of Venice and its land by France the remaining 6 serving ships of the Venetian fleet were captured and began to serve under the French flag. The french did however spend quite some time and resources completing the various Venetian half built ships left in the Arsenal sheds, this meant the final ships of the construction plans of the 1730s were completed and brought into use serving various roles in the French naval expeditions, with a large selection of the remaining ships being sent to Toulon and outfitted to form Napoleon's expedition to Egypt, due to this they eventually came into conflict with the Royal Navy. Over time the ships became damaged in combat or due to wear and tear, The last surviving ship Medea, had begun her construction in 1732, launched in 1793 and was finally broken up in 1825 after 32 years of service. The Leon Trionfante Class The Leon Trionfante class consisted of 16 ships in 4 different Series, The First Series: Leon Trionfante, 70 guns (1716) San Giacomo, 70 guns (1761) Buon Consiglio, 70 guns (1761) Fedelta, 70 guns (1770) Forza, 70 guns (1774) The Second Series: Corriera Veneta, 70 guns (1770) Diligenza, 70 guns (1774) Fenice 2, 70 guns (1779) Galatea, 70 guns (1779) Third Series: Vittoria 2, 70 guns (1785) La Guerriera, 70 guns (1785) Medea, 66 guns (1793) Unnamed, 66 guns (1800) was transformed into a floating gunned pontoon by the Austrians Fourth Series: L'Eolo 1785 San Giorgio 1785 Unnamed, 66 guns (1800) was transformed into a gunned pontoon by the Austrians Armaments: I am giving the cannon poundage in Venetian Pounds. Early Armament (Leon Trionfante Only): 6 x 120lb (shell) (main gun deck) (English pounds ??) 24 x 40lb (main gun deck) (26.5 British pounds) 30 x 20lb (second gun deck) (13.25 British pounds) 8 x 14lb (quarterdeck) (9 British pounds) 2 x 200lb (shell) (forecastle) (English Pounds??) Broadside: 836lb + 3x 120lb shell and 1x 200lb shell (552.75 British pounds + Shells) (sidenote: I will try investigate the shells and update later, as we don't have shells in the game I don't deem it super important) Late Armament (1761 onwards): 28 x 40lb (26.5 British pounds) 28 x 30lb (20 British pounds) 14 x 14lb (9 British pounds) Broadside: 1078lb (714 British Pounds) 66 Armament: 26 x 40lb (26.5 British pounds) 28 x 30lb (20 British pounds) 12 x 14lb (9 British pounds) Broadside: 1024lb (678.5 British pounds) Measurements: Because of the different build periods and the little tweaks made, there are 3 different measurements to the class, similarly to the way Temeraire had slightly different models made within her class. Piedi is the Venetian foot. First Series: Length of Keel: 124 piedi (43.11m) Length at Longest Point: 140.5 piedi (48.86m) Width at Widest point: 37 piedi (12.85m) Bilge Tip: 28.5 piedi (9.9m) Draft: 18.5 piedi (6.43m) Second Series: Length of Keel: 122 piedi (42.38m) Length at Longest Point: 142.47 piedi (49.5m) Width at Widest point: 37 piedi (12.85) Bilge Tip: 28.5 piedi (9.9m) Draft: 18.5 piedi (6.43m) Third and Fourth Series: Length of Keel: 126 piedi (43.81m) Length at Longest Point: 146.47 piedi (50.93) Width at Widest point: 37 piedi (12.85) Bilge Tip: 28.5 piedi (9.9m) Draft: 18.5 piedi (6.43m) Plans: (In Darker but slightly more bent form for those who might not see the lines above) Sail Plans Artwork As usual, I apologies for any distortion through page bending, I work to the best quality I can with the resources Available. Thank you for reading and getting down this far, I hope you enjoyed the essay and plan, again as usual I am more than happy to go into detail on any particular part if I can. PS. Its your turn SteelSandwich, I'd like to see that dutch corvette post you were thinking of doing
  7. A lot has been said about the greatest docks and shipyards in history, from the ancient shipyards of Athens, Carthage and Rome to the more modern sites of Britain, Spain, France and the Netherlands but none of these has changed the world quite as significantly as the Venetian arsenal. The Venetian Arsenal, first started as a small project of the Venetian state in 1104. Its purpose was to cheaply and efficiently service the state owned Galleys used to protect the interests of Venice's key source of income through trade. The Arsenal grew with the republic to not just become the worlds most impressive shipyard but in general largest industrial complex too. Its importance is paramount to the history of the world and has had a greater effect on your life than you would likely realise. While Venice had a huge amount of shipyards, and was known in its early history For supplying the Crusaders with ships, due to its unique position and ability of craftsmen none even came close to the power or prestige of the Arsenal. During the height of the Arsenal in the 1550s-60s the Shipyard had over 16,000 employees, with over 1200 master shipwrights, 1000 master caulkers and around 100 master oarmakers. Other crafts included foundry workers, sail makers and rope spinners that you would associate with any shipyard. The cost to Venice of the Arsenal during this period was over 150,000 ducats a year, to put this into perspective the Venetians paid around 200,000 ducats for the purchase of the island of Corfu. Resources were drawn for the running of the Arsenal from all over Venice, with timbers being drawn mostly from the woodlands owned by the Facility in the Montello foothills in treviso, this woodland was for exclusive use for the Arsenal. The Arsenal played such an important part of Venetian life time was kept to the clocks of the Arsenal and it took up about 15% the total land space of Venice and being in one of the positions of power with sway in the Arsenal was one of the most prestigious political jobs you could get, especially to become one of the Lords of the Arsenal. The construction of the Arsenal started in 1104 and for a time it remained a small enterprise of the Venetian state. The initial functions were to make a small income for the state and secure the Venetian mercantile fleet a reliable place to come and have repairs done, the owners of the ships would then be able to do what they do best and venture into the world to trade. The original Arsenal saw its first expansion in the 1200s, then for a Further 200 years The arsenal Expanded larger and larger to meet the demands of the Republic, In all there were numerous updating programs and 6 major upgrades during the time of the republic, in response to scale, scope and technological needs. The Main expansions were Formation of the Arsenal Vecchio around 1224-1304, Then in 1304-1322 the main rope manufactury was constructed. In 1325 the first huge expansion happened, the construction of the Arsenal Nuovo, this was the project that lead the Arsenal to really become the powerhouse we see historically, the complex almost tripled in size over the space of a year, bringing huge importance to the Arsenal and making it the largest state enterprise of Venice. The formation of the Arsenal Nuovo was of such significance that the next major upgrade wasn't constructed for over 100 years, when they began work on the section that became known as The Arsenal Nuovoissima, which added another section increasing the complex to twice what it was before, the main need for this expansion was to deal with the increased threat of the growing Ottoman empire, following the fall of Constantinople 20 years previous. The Arsenal then saw the building of a row of sheds splitting off the Arsenal Nuovo and Nuovissima around 1508. The last major upgrades happened in 1535-40 with the expansion of the specialist area specifically designed for constructing Galleass, with the last expansion being in 1620 as part of the continual modernisation process through the 1600s bringing it up to speed with modern technology. The full list of expansions are available here: http://arsenalofvenice.weebly.com/history-of-the-arsenale.html Thanks to the continual investment, improvements and concentration of resources the Arsenal prospered with the Venetian Lagoon allowing the Arsenal to be built in a safe place, away from the potential raids by both land and sea which left it in a rather unique place to expand to its potential away from harm, unlike most of the Venetian shipyards situated on the island of Lido. To amalgamate this geographical safety advantage the Venetian Government completely encircled the Arsenal, safe from any possible aggressive force, and also securely tucked away from prying eyes and spies. The Arsenal became such a huge part of Naval dominance it was copied by Venice's greatest rivals, first the Arsenal at Genoa was constructed, then the Ottomans constructed their own version on the coast of Gallipoli neither of which really managed the same level of prestige that can be attributed to the Arsenal of Venice. The Arsenal was even mentioned in Dante's inferno. The Arsenal was set up in a system that used dry and wet sheds to ultimately construct multiple vessels at a time at its height The Arsenal was allegedly able to construct a ship a day, but this is largely due to the way the Shipyard used interchangeable and standardised parts, which was one of the major technologies it gave the world, it was practising this method as early as the 1350s. The arsenal often contained the parts to fully construct between 100-200 ships at any time, although a large portion of these parts were kept as spares for existing ship maintenance. A more realistic estimate would be that during peak operations the Shipyard could produce a completely new ship from scratch in between 1-2 weeks. While other major shipyards like the ones in Chatham and Portsmouth would struggle to see a new ship sooner than 6 months, showing the staggering production capacity of the Arsenal. To put it into further context the peak production of the Arsenal in the 1550-60s wasn't ever reached in the pre industrial period and was only eclipsed by the great factories during the industrial revolution, with no shipyard on the planet meeting a higher output until 1909. When it comes to ships, the some of major contributions of the Arsenal include: The Light Galley of the 1350s The War Galley of 1486 The Galleon The Scaloccio of the 1500s. The Quinquereme resurrection in 1524 The Lepanto Galeass 1560s The Galleass of 1654 (The first scientifically designed ship of the modern period) The Galleass of 1690 San Lorenzo Zustinian Class 1690 Leon Trionfante Class 1716 The Ultimate Galleass 1724 The 1780 Fregata Grossa (The first real Battle Cruiser, Improved to form the Fama Class) Cerere Class (which then resulted in the 44 cannoni Class) The Galleass of 1654 is particularly important. The increased pressure from the Ottoman Empire forced Venice to start thinking more technologically to maintain its sea advantage against the much larger and more resourceful Turks. This pressure forced the Venetians into looking more scientifically at the developments of ships in the ancient world, most notably the Quinqueremes of Rome, Egypt and Carthage. This lead onto technical arrangements of rowing benches but also spurred investigations to lines and theories of ancient maritime warfare. This was combined with the new developments during the renaissance and contemporary sciences. This work was undertaken by some big names in Venetian Maritime history, the most well known of which is Galileo, who completed his apprenticeship in naval architecture in the closing stages of the 17th Century, Galileo maintained friendship and worked closely with his friends who later became prominent Lords of the Arsenal, together their work resulted in the Galeass of 1654, which was so groundbreaking the design wasn't really topped until the Ultimate Galleass of 1724. This work also laid the foundations for the French architects of the 18th century who continued where the Venetians left off, using the same methods to construct their Atlantic fleets, although Venetians still kept their huge advantage when it came to Galleys. While Venice constructed its first Atlantic style ship of the line in 1666 they were playing catch up, 24 years Later they Launched the San Lorenzo Zustinian, which was a return to form at the top table of naval design. After San Lorenzo Zustinian The Arsenal's lowered resources from the decline of the Venetian Empire started to show, while still significant in Galeass design the time of galleys had mostly passed and No significant designs really appeared until Angelo Emo's reforms which changed the focus of Venetian design to hard hitting shock ships, this resulted in a focus on two fairly open ratings of ships Fregata Grossa and Fregata Leggara, Fregata Leggara was filled with heavy corvettes, the largest of which was armed with 34 guns although The Fregata Grossa rating is potentially more interesting, started by the 1780 class but what really made it was the ship La Fama, Angelo Emo's flag ship. These ships were the fantastic swan songs of Venice they worked in a similar way as the frigates of 100 years later, and took the same combat role as the modern Battle Cruiser. A List of some of the other Advancements Venetian Arsenal gives us are: The Bombard Cannon Standardised Interchangeable Parts The Production Line The Basis for Modern Ballistics The Birth of Modern Science Social Security Division and specialisation of Labour A basis for modern trade The modern State Navy If anyone wants to know more I will gladly talk more, especially about specific details. Thank you for Reading
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