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Found 204 results

  1. Sviatoi Georgii Pobedonosets 21019 Nominal Guns 66 Nationality Russia Operator Baltic Sea Keel Laid Down 1778/07/09 Launched 1780/09/16 How acquired Purpose built Shipyard Kronshtadt Ship Class Aziia Class Constructor A. S. Katsanov Category Third Rate Ship Type Ship of the Line Broken Up 1808 Dimensions Dimension Measurement Type Metric Equivalent RWAS Length of Gundeck 160' 0" Imperial Feet Breadth 44' 6" Imperial Feet Depth in Hold 19' 0" Imperial Feet Armament 1780/09/16 Broadside Weight = 469.5 Russian Artillery Pound (564.285 lbs 255.8292 kg) RWAS Lower Gun Deck 24 Russian 24-Pounder Lower Gun Deck 2 Russian 1-Pood Edinorog (1767) Upper Gun Deck 2 Russian 1/2-Pood Edinorog Upper Gun Deck 22 Russian 12-Pounder Quarterdeck/Forecastle 16 Russian 6-Pounder I have pictures intended for modelling but am unable to upload due to file size so am not sure what to do about that.
  2. 'Eendracht' Need more info. Dropbox: https://www.dropbox.com/s/mu8zflm6rvzgh46/Unknown1.jpg?dl=0
  3. Work in Progress. The Battle of the Chesapeake, also known as the Battle of the Virginia Capes or simply the Battle of the Capes, was a crucial naval battle in the American War of Independence that took place near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay on 5 September 1781, between a British fleet led by Rear Admiral Sir Thomas Graves and a French fleet led by Rear Admiral Francois Joseph Paul, the Comte de Grasse. Although tactically indecisive, the battle was strategically decisive, since it prevented the Royal Navy from reinforcing or evacuating the forces of Lieutenant General Lord Cornwallis at Yorktown, Virginia. When the French were able to achieve control of the sea lanes against the British, the result was the reinforcement of the Franco-American army with siege artillery and French reinforcements—all of which proved decisive in the Siege of Yorktown, effectively securing independence for the Thirteen Colonies. Presented in July 1781 with the options of attacking British forces in either New York or Virginia, Admiral de Grasse opted for the latter, arriving at the Chesapeake at the end of August. Upon learning that de Grasse had sailed from the West Indies for North America, and that French Admiral de Barras had also sailed from Newport, Rhode Island, Admiral Graves concluded that they were going to join forces at the Chesapeake. Sailing south from New York with 19 ships of the line, Graves arrived at the mouth of the Chesapeake early on 5 September to see de Grasse's fleet at anchor in the bay. De Grasse hastily prepared most of his fleet, 24 ships of the line, for battle and sailed out to meet Graves. In a two-hour engagement that took place after hours of maneuvering, the lines of the two fleets did not completely meet, with only the forward and center sections of the lines fully engaging. The battle was consequently fairly evenly matched, although the British suffered more casualties and ship damage. The battle broke off when the sun set. British tactics in the battle have been a subject of contemporary and historical debate ever since. For several days the two fleets sailed within view of each other, with de Grasse preferring to lure the British away from the bay, where Barras was expected to arrive carrying vital siege equipment. On 13 September de Grasse broke away from the British and returned to the Chesapeake, where Barras had arrived. Graves returned to New York to organize a larger relief effort; this did not sail until 19 October, two days after Cornwallis surrendered. Updating Links British Fleet in Formation: Alfred (1778) Belliqueux (1780) Invincible (1765) Barfleur (1768) Monarch (1765) Centaur America (1777) Bedford (1775) Resolution (1770) London (1766) Royal Oak (1769) Montague (1779) Europe (1765) Terrible (1762) Ajax (1767) Princessa (1780) Alcide (1779) Intrepid (1770) Shrewsbury (1758) French Fleet in Formation: (Help Me Find Blueprints) Pluton Marseillois Bourgogne (1766) Diadème Réfléchi Auguste Saint-Esprit Caton Centre César Destin Ville de Paris Victoire Sceptre Northumberland (1780) Palmier Solitaire Citoyen Rear Scipion Magnanime Hercule Languedoc Zélé Hector Souverain
  4. 'La Bretagne' The Bretagne was a large 110-gun three-decker French ship of the line, built at Brest, which became famous as the flagship of the Brest Fleet during the American War of Independence. She was funded by a don des vaisseaux grant by the Estates of Brittany. Bretagne was one of seventeen ships of the line ordered in 1762 as a result of the Duc de Choiseul’s campaign to raise funds for the navy from the cities and provinces of France. She was completed at Brest in 1766. Specs: La Bretagne 1765-1796 By A. Grignard Built In Breast Launched in 1766 184' - 50' - 24'6'' 30-gun of 36-pdr; 32-gun of 24-pdr; 32-gun of 12-pdr; 6-gun of 6-pdr Total 116-gun In 1777, La Bretagne undergoes a major remake of 2/3. Artillery is given a 110-gun. Other name, le Révolutionnaire in 1793 This ship could be a great addition to NA 1st rate team.
  5. Could someone help me look for plans for this Téméraire-class ship of the line and since this was such an iconic french vessel and i gladly would lik to see this ship in the game and ill post this image.
  6. SteelSandwich

    Admiraal de Ruyter - 1806

    The Admiraal de Ruyter was a Dutch 80-gun ship-of-the-line, part of the Wreker Class (translation: Avenger). 7 ships would be build according to Pieter Glavimans' design which was approved by the admiralty in 1795. Supervising the build of the first two vessels, the class' leadship "Wreker" left the dockyard in 1798. Including "Chatham" and "Admiral Zoutman" the first order of the wreker class' vessels was finished in 1800. Impressed by the ships' overall performance another batch of four new vessels were approved by the admiralty. In 1806 "Admiraal de Ruyter" left the dockyard. -Wreker 1798 (Amsterdam) -Chatham 1799 (Rotterdam) -Admiraal Zoutman 1800 (Amsterdam) -Admiraal de Ruyter 1806 (Rotterdam) -De Leeuw 1806 (Amsterdam) -Admiraal de Ruyter 1808 (Amsterdam) -Admiraal Evertsen 1808 (Amsterdam) The measurement of the class (amsterdamse voet): 195 ft x 51 ft x 22 ft In meters: 55.2 x 14.4 x 6.2 Hereby the plans of the Ruyter: Originally the Class was destined to carry 80-gun (pounds are in dutch): Lower gun deck: 36-pounders Upper gun deck: 30-pounders FC&QD: 12-pounders Yet on the plan you can clearly see a flush top deck. For reference, underneath is a ship plan included of how the original 80-gun version looked like (Wreker's plan): The new 90-gun version had an improved armament. Besides the 12-pounder cannons, a series of 36-pounder carronades would be added along the gangways. Excluding the added Carronades the ships' broadside weight was a respectable 1156 british pound (converted from dutch pd). Adding 9 Carronades the broadside weight is boosted by 352 (brit) pound resulting in a total of 1509 brit pound To illustrate the ship a bit more: Sidegallery +stern for both Admiraal de Ruyter as well as Admiraal Evertsen. The stern for the Admiraal de Ruyter, after being renamed to Rotterdam. The bow for Admiraal de Ruyter herself: Over her lifespan she would be renamed several times. Admiraal de Ruyter whilst build Admiraal Piet Hein from launch in 1806 Rotterdam from 1806 (late) Koninklijke Hollander from 1808 (Royal) Hollandais from 1810 (french service) Koninklijke Hollander from 1814 (return to dutch service The reason why she changed names whilst being build is quite interesting. When arriving in the Netherlands, Louis Napoleon visited one of the 1808 ships in construction. In honor of the dutch nation's greatest admiral, he christened the ship Admiraal de Ruyter. Unknown to him at the time, there was already a ship being build who carried the same name, hence why she was immediately (and temporarily) renamed Admiraal Piet Hein. An interesting characteristic of the ship class is that they all utilized a lateen yard instead of a spanker. A incredible model has been made of the Chatham pre-refit. Additional models of the Chatham: Initially it was hard to get a accurate grip on the internals of the ship, regardless of the above shown models. Luckily the Wreker actually has a full set on internals available. To top it off, there is a remarkable drawing of the Admiraal Zoutman in existence, truly gorgeous. Great for paintscheme reference. Another ship designed and build by Pieter Glavimans at the same time which was turned into a model is the 1798 Neptunus(74), which is also great for paintscheme reference.
  7. Le Bucentaure Bucentaure was an 80-gun ship of the line of the French Navy, and the lead ship of her class. She was the flagship of Vice-Admiral Latouche Tréville, who died on board on 18 August 1804. The Bucentaure at Trafalgar Vice-Admiral Villeneuve hoisted his flag on 6 November 1804. Bucentaure hosted the Franco-Spanish war council while sheltered from the British fleet at Cadiz. The vote was to remain in safe waters (a decision later overruled by Admiral Villeneuve) During the council, Spanish general Escaño complained that the atmospheric pressure was descending (a sign of approaching storms). French vice-admiral Magon famously retorted "the thing descending here is braveness". This offended Admiral Gravina and other Spanish officers who did not oppose later the imprudent order of taking to sea. At the Battle of Trafalgar, on 21 October 1805, she was commanded by Captain Jean-Jacques Magendie. Admiral Nelson's HMS Victory, leading the weather column of the British fleet, broke the French line just astern of Bucentaure and just ahead of Redoutable. Victory raked her less protected stern and the vessel lost 197 men and 85 were wounded (including Captain Magendie); Admiral Villeneuve was lucky to survive, but this effectively put Bucentaure out of most of the fight. After three hours of fighting, she surrendered to Captain James Atcherly of the Marines from HMS Conqueror. Villeneuve is supposed to have asked to whom he was surrendering. On being told it was Captain Pellew, he replied, 'There is no shame in surrendering to the gallant Sir Edward Pellew.' When he was informed that the Conqueror's captain (Israel Pellew) was Sir Edward's brother, he said, 'England is fortunate to have two such brothers.' In the following days, Bucentaure's crew rose up against the British prize crew, and recaptured the ship. However, she was wrecked in the gale-force storm of 23 October 1805. ----------------------------------------------- Found these online, so you can see how it will look after it is finished: This is not an actual NA game model!! NA WIP:
  8. History Fama was the flagship of the last great Admiral of the Venetian Republic Angelo Emo, who captained the ship during his continuous missions hunting down Barbary pirate including the siege of Tunis in 1785. Angelo Praised Fama for her considerable speed and agility naming the ship as comfortably the best Venice had. The plans for Fama were drawn up in 1782 and 6 ships were laid, of which 5 were completed she was constructed in the Venetian Arsenal by Giovanni Domenico Giacomazzi, who was considered the best venetian shipwright in of his time and built accordingly the "ad ordinata doppia" system which was implement in 1780 by Angelo Emo who after studying the construction techniques used by the English and the French, hoped to match them or even surpass them. Fama herself spent most of her career in active service, either stationed off of Corfu with the main detachment of the Venetian navy, ready to face threats from threats to the mouth of the Adriatic by the Ottomans or other hostile nations or spent hunting Pirates over the Mediterranean or Barbary Coast. Fama was captured alongside the rest of the Venetian fleet by Napoleon in 1797 when she was briefly renamed Renomee and then renamed again to Du Blois a month later. After her capture she was sailed to Tulon where she was rearmed with slightly smaller guns to fit French standards to take part in Napoleon's Egyptian expedition where she unfortunately collided with the French flagship "L'Orient", suffering severe damage. Despite her damage she remained to Alexandria and was used as headquarters by General Kleber was later partially sunk to block the entrance into Alexandria, she was then captured by the British and sadly broken up without the French, nor British ever realising her potential as a swift and powerful shock ship or as a strong commerce escort and pirate hunter. The Fama Class were given heavy armaments to match larger capital ships but maintaining the speed, versatility and agility of a frigate, thus the name Fregata Grossa came about, translating to Large Frigate, The ideas behind the Fregata Grossa rated ships were to hit hard and fast, able to set combat to their own advantage the theory was a cross between their contemporary super frigates and modern battlecruisers. They also contain similar thoughts used in the huge super frigates of the later 19th century but obviously without the steam engines to power them. The 6 Ships of the Fama Class were: Fama (1784) Gloria Veneta (1794) Le Stengel (1797) Le Beyrand (1797) Diamante (1797) Unnamed (uncompleted) Fama and Gloria Veneta both served under the Venetian Republic with considerable distinction. The other ships of the class were completed during the French and Austrian Occupation periods. Le Stengal and Beyrand both served briefly in the Napoleonic fleet and were then transferred to Austria as part of the peace deal. Diamante was badly damaged during the French Looting period and was patched up but sailed poorly, to deal with this she was armed from head to toe with 24lb guns and used as a floating battery, later she was repaired and served in the Austrian navy as a troop transport ship. A further Unnamed ship of the class was laid but damaged beyond salvation and was sadly broken up with parts being used to outfit other ships but mostly used as firewood. Fama well represents the Venetian Naval doctrine of the time, Venice continuing to fight with a hybrid fleet of Galeass, Galleys and Frigates, due to the history and nature of what remained of the Venetian Empire. Her outfitting, speed and manoeuvrability made her a great shock ship with a strong punch, able to hunt down pirates and operate well in shallow waters and archipelagos with complex coastlines. She is also incredibly well suited for the calm waters of the Mediterranean and able to produce good speed no matter the wind conditions. She was praised for her sailworthiness by her captains and considered the jewel in the late Venetian Fleet. Details Fama was considered a Secondo Rango Fregata Grossa within the Venetian Fleet, then after she was captured by the French she was reclassified as a 3rd rate, although if she were in the game she would likely be similarly placed as Agamemnon, among the 4th rates. Her measurements are (peidi are the Venetian feet): Total Length: 138 piedi or 48.00 meters Keel: 122 piedi or 42.42 meters Width: 37 piedi or 12.86 meters Draft: 17.5 piedi or 6.08 meters (when under French service: 16 fore, 18ft aft (5.2-5.85m)) Bilge Tip (height between the keel and deck): 28 piedi or 9.73m She was crewed by around 450-500 men, depending on how many sailors Venice could muster at the time. The Venetian state had a continuous issue with raising the appropriate number of men to serve on her navies during the later years of the republic. Fama had similar crew numbers to her contemporary 64s by other navies, however due to her smaller size these men served in even more cramp conditions than was generally experienced by the worlds navies, her officers quarters were equally as confined, especially considering that she was used for most of her career as an admiral's flagship, although these close natured lodgings were something the Venetians were always used to back at home in Venice. She sailed incredibly well and was praised for being hugely fast and agile, giving her the best ability to perform her main tasks, protecting merchant shipping and hunting down pirates. Her performance under sail is fairly well documented, receiving universal commendation from the officers who sailed her. I have not yet found any information about how she heeled, rolled and other similar specifics, as Venice had no sailing queries similar to the Royal Navy. Armaments Fama Carried 66 Guns, and her four chasers, below is a make up of weight and armaments during both the French and Venetian outfitting. She also had the potential to point the two cannons nearest the bow on the main gun deck in a forwards direction to aid the 2 dedicated chase guns situated either side of the foremast and 2 rear facing guns. During Venetian period by Venetian Weight 26 x 40lb (26.5 British pounds) (12.04 kg) 26 x 30lb (20 British pounds) (9.03 kg) 14 x 14lb (9 British pounds) (4.21 kg) 2x 14lb (9 British lb) Bow Chasers (4.21 kg) 2x 14lb (9 British lb) Stern Chasers (4.21 kg) Broadside Weight = 1008 Venetian Pounds (667.5 British Pounds) (303.4 kg) French Period By French Weight (reduced to a 64) 26 x 24lb (11.74 kg) 26 x 18lb (8.8 kg) 12 x 6lb (2.93 kg) 2 x 6lb Bow Chasers (2.93 kg) 2 x 6lb Stern Chasers (2.93 kg) Broadside Weight = 588 French Pound (634.75 British Pounds) (287.5kg) Plans The most true plans, showing the proper lines of of either La Fama or Gloria Veneta, as said below in a post stating the edit history of this thread. This is the only record showing the proper 66 broadside gun ports, although the plan below does miss her bow chasers. The other plans like with her sister ship Stengel show the correct lines, but sadly show incorrect positioning for the guns on the quarterdeck, the other plans show only 6 guns either side (12 in total) from when she was reduced to a 64 rather than the true build when she had 7 (14), which are shown correctly here. This is a modern reproduction by Guido Ercole, there are a couple of minor mistakes where she is shown having 28 guns, not her proper 26 on both her gun decks, she is also missing a gun on her weather deck. The rest of the reproduction is still accurate, with the sail plan and also shows a nice idea of what she would have looked like painted. Some less detailed plans, most likely showing Stengel, after she has one of her weather deck gun ports removed making her into a 64. Rough Planking and Framing Methods used Art Many Thanks go to Sella22 for letting me use some of his resources, I would really love to see this ship in the game, she would be a fantastic addition. Thank you for Reading.
  9. After extensive research i felt ready to start modelling the Bucentaure class 2nd rate French ship. Since information about this type is very scarse despite being one of the backbones of french navy in the era next to Temeraire and Ocean classes, luckyly enough after reading and googling about every Tonnant and Bucentaure class ship for information i was able to find some referencess including captured tonnant plans, bucentaure lines plans from a french book by Jean Boudriot and excellent Bucentaure class model "Friedland" in the french naval museum with photos from their site and in the books as well, and paintings of the classes from the era i started laying the lines for this magnificent ship. So here is the first screanshot very early in progress. I will post updates as i work through it. Hope youll like it
  10. Jack_the_Stripper

    Noske Løve 3rd rate, 1765 (With Plans)

    The NORSKE LOEVE was built in 1765 by the Nyholm shipyard, close to Copenhagen. The ship was named after the Norwegian Lion and the Danish-Norwegian Imperial Coat of Arms. There was a crew of 667 men and an armament of 70 iron cannons, with 26 cannons 24 pd. on the lower deck, 26 cannons 18 pd. on the middle deck and 18 cannons 8 pd. on the upper deck. All ornaments, made by the sculptor C. Moellerup, were reminders of Norway. On the transom there is a fisherman and a farmer, symbolizing the most important trades of Norway, agriculture and fishing. Construc. No. 37 Name: NORSKE LØVE Type: Ship-of-the-Line Naval Architect: Knud N. Benstrup Weight: 1176¼ læsts Armament: 70 cannon – 24 pdr. in the main battery Dimensions: Length – 164′ Beam – 44′ 6″ Draft – 18′ (fore), 20′ (aft) Construction Dates: Keel Laid – May 17, 1734, Launched – February 9, 1735 Crew: Out of Service: 1764
  11. This is the ship i want the most because its proper cool french ship and she could be a flagship for ships And i have to say a french looking ship could be nice, because i want to be a frenchman and then i want somthing that can match english ships.
  12. D. Federico de Gravina y N

    Montañés-Class Ships of the Line

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monta%C3%B1%C3%A9s-class_ship_of_the_line The Montañés were a class of four ships of the line designed and built between 1792 and 1798 by Julián Martín de Retamosa for the Spanish Navy The four ships in the class, and their fates, were: Montañés (1794) - ran aground in 1810. Monarca (1794) - captured by Britain at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 and later lost in the storm. Argonauta (1798) - captured by Britain at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 and later sunk in the storm. Neptuno (1795) - lost in the storm after the Battle of Trafalgar. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_ship_Neptuno_(1795) Neptuno was an 80-gun Montañes-class ship of the line of the Spanish Navy. She was built in 1795 and took part in the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. She fought with the Franco-Spanish fleet in the battle of Trafalgar, and was wrecked in its aftermath. Neptuno was built at Ferrol and launched in 1795. She entered service in time to support an attempt to unite with a French force and land troops in England, but the Spanish fleet under Admiral José de Córdoba y Ramos was intercepted and engaged by a British fleet under Sir John Jervis. Neptuno did not take part in the battle, having been sent into port beforehand. Several years later she was in a Spanish port when the combined Franco-Spanish fleet under Vice-Admiral Pierre-Charles Villeneuve arrived, having sailed to the West Indies and back, and been engaged by a British fleet in the Battle of Cape Finisterre. Neptuno joined the fleet in her attempt to reach Brest, but the plan to join with another French fleet failed and Neptuno ended up with the rest of the fleet, blockaded in Cadiz by a British fleet under Lord Nelson. Villeneuve came out of Cadiz in late 1805, and was engaged by Nelson in the decisive Battle of Trafalgar on 21 October. As the lead ship of the line, Neptuno was initially isolated from the main fighting, though she joined in an attempt later in the day to come to the aid of Villeneuve's flagship. Instead she became trapped and engaged by two British ships and, after fighting for over an hour, surrendered. She was taken in hand by a British prize crew, but two days after the battle a sortie by some of the survivors from the battle succeeded in retaking her. She was towed towards a friendly port but, already badly damaged in the battle, was caught up in the powerful storm that struck the area and ran aground. Her crew were evacuated, and Neptuno broke up in the heavy seas. Construction and commissioning Neptuno was built at the Royal Dockyard at Ferrol as one of the Montañes-class of 74- and 80-gun ships of the line, a design developed by Romero Landa and based on his earlier San Ildefonso class of 1785. Among her sisters were the Argonauta and Monarca, both of which fought alongside Neptuno at Trafalgar. She carried twenty-eight 24-pounder guns on her lower gundeck, thirty 18-pounders on her upper deck, fourteen 8-pounders on her quarter deck and four 8-pounders on her forecastle. By 1805 she had been fitted with four 18 pounder carronades on her poop, while the 18 pounders on her upper deck had been replaced by 24 pounders. Overall work on the ships of the Montañes class was overseen by Julién de Retamosa, and Neptuno was launched at Ferrol in 1795. There then followed a period of fitting out and carrying out sea trials during 1796, after which she was assigned to the Spanish Mediterranean fleet at Cartagena under Admiral José de Córdoba y Ramos. Shortly afterwards Spain allied with Republican France and entered the French Revolutionary Wars against Britain and her allies. The Spanish Navy was assigned to support the planned invasion of Britain. Alliance with France Neptuno put to sea on 1 February 1797 with the rest of Córdoba's fleet, consisting of 27 ships of the line, twelve frigates, one brig and several smaller craft. They sailed from Cartagena and passed through the Strait of Gibraltar on 5 February. Córdoba had orders to deliver a number of gunboats to Algeciras to support the bombardment of Gibraltar, safely escort a convoy of four urcas carrying mercury from Malaga to Cadiz, and then sail to Brest to link up with the French. The first part of the operation went smoothly, andNeptuno was detached with the 74-gun ships Bahama and Terrible, the 34-gun Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe to take the gunboats into Algeciras. Neptuno and Bahamaremained at Algeciras, while Terrible sailed to rejoin Córdoba. Strong easterly winds prevented Córdoba from making port at Cadiz, and his ships were scattered to the west, before they could make sail back to the Spanish coast. As they approached Cadiz on 14 February his fleet was tracked down off Cape St Vincent by a British force under Sir John Jervis. Neptuno and her consorts took no part in the action that followed, during which the Spanish were defeated. Approach to Trafalgar Portrait of Cayetano Valdés y Flores, commander of Neptuno at Trafalgar, painted by José Roldán y Martínez, Sevilla, 1847 By 1805 Neptuno was based at Ferrol, under the command of Captain Don Cayetano Valdés y Flores. There she was joined in late July by ships of the combined Franco-Spanish fleet under Vice-Admiral Pierre-Charles Villeneuve. The combined fleet had recently arrived in European waters from the West Indies, where they had evaded a British fleet under Lord Nelson, but had failed to carry out any attacks on the British colonies in the Caribbean. The fleet, hotly pursued across the Atlantic by Nelson, had been intercepted by another fleet underRobert Calder that had been positioned off Cape Finisterre in expectation of their arrival. Calder captured two of Villeneuve's ships in a confused action, after which Villeneuve withdrew to Ferrol and Corunna. He sailed again on 9 August, taking the Spanish ships he had found in those ports, including Neptuno, with him, hoping to rendezvous with the French Rochefort squadron under Zacharie Allemand.The hoped-for rendezvous failed: the two French fleets supposedly mistook each other for the main British fleet and, instead of joining, attempted to escape from each other, with Villeneuve fleeing to Cádiz. After spending several months there, watched by the blockading British fleet under Nelson, Villeneuve decided to put to sea in mid-October. Valdés prepared Neptuno for sea, and the fleet sailed from Cadiz on 19 October. Neptuno was initially the rearmost ship of the combined fleet as it sailed southwards, but as the British approached on the morning of 21 October, Villeneuve formed the line of battle and ordered it to come about heading northwards, with Neptuno now the lead ship of the van. She was ahead of the 74-gun French Scipion, and formed part of the squadron under Rear-Admiral Pierre Dumanoir le Pelley, which had previously been intended as the rear of the fleet. Trafalgar Initially isolated by the British strike at the centre and rear of the combined fleet's line, Neptuno was ordered to hug the wind to allow the other ships to get to their stations. Neptuno was fired upon by the 64-gun HMS Africa, which had arrived late to the battle and sailed southwards parallel down the line, exchanging broadsides with the ships of the fleet. Africa's long range fire caused little damage. At 2 pm Dumanoir brought the van around and headed south to support the beleaguered centre, trying to fight his way through to Villeneuve's flagship, the 80-gun Bucentaure. With Dumanoir in the attempt were Neptuno and four French ships, the 80-gun Formidable, and the 74-gun ships Scipion, Duguay-Trouin and the Mont-Blanc. Neptuno fought her way through to Bucentaure, with Valdés hoping to use her boats to recapture the flagship. The plan came to nothing when he discovered the boats had been destroyed by gunfire. Neptuno herself was soon in trouble; at 4 pm she was cut off by the two rear-most ships of Nelson's weather column, the newly arrived 74-gun ships HMS Minotaur and HMS Spartiate. Neptuno fought both of them for the next hour, having her mizzen mast shot away, and her rigging badly damaged. Valdés, who had already been wounded twice during the battle, was hit in the head and neck by falling debris from the collapsing mizzenmast and lost consciousness. He was taken below to be treated, and command devolved to his second, Joaquín Somoza. After an hour of fighting Neptuno lost her fore topmast, the foretop, foreyard and foreshrouds, followed by her main topmast and the main stay. Valdés' successor, Somoza, was also wounded, and First Lieutenant Antonio Miranda took command. Neptuno struck her colours at 5.10 pm, becoming the last of the combined fleet to surrender. Accounts of her casualties vary but they appear to have been relatively light, with 38 to 42 dead and 42 to 47 wounded. She had by now been isolated from the rest of the fleet, and may have surrendered due to declining morale as a result. The British had been aiming high, in order to disable Neptuno and prevent her from escaping. A boarding party of 48 men from Minotaur, led by Marine Second Lieutenant Thomas Reeves arrived on board to take Neptuno's surrender. Valdés was undergoing treatment in thecockpit, so First Lieutenant Antonio Miranda went aboard Minotaur and submitted his sword to her captain, Charles Mansfield. Reeves took of a lieutenant and twenty-five men out of Neptuno and sent them to Minotaur, secured the prisoners aboard Neptuno, locked away the firearms, and placed a guard on the magazine. Storm, and wreck Minotaur took Neptuno in tow at 3.30 am the next day, and at daylight work began to clear away the wreckage of battle. As the storm rose, the towline snapped, putting Neptunoin danger of running onto a lee shore and being wrecked. The battered mainmast collapsed on 22 October, smashing through the captain's cabins below the poop, crushing to death Spanish paymaster Diego de Soto as he slept, and killing one of the British prize crew. Now completely dismasted the crew struggled to shore up the decks to prevent them from collapsing, and tried to jury rig sails. On 23 October French Captain Julien Cosmao made a sortie from Cadiz with some of the more seaworthy ships that had escaped the battle, in an attempt to retake some of the captured prizes. Cosmao's squadron consisted of two French 80-gun ships, Neptune and Indomptable, the 74-gun French Pluton, and two Spanish ships, the 100-gun Rayo and the 74-gun San Francisco de Asis. Also with the ships of the line were the smaller French ships that had been present at the battle but had not taken part, the frigates Cornélie,Thémis, Hortense, Rhin and Hermione, and the brigs Furet and Argus. In preparation for the counter-attack the British cast off several of the prizes and formed a defensive line. While Cornélie, Hortense, Thémis and Rhin harassed the British, Hermione took Neptuno in tow, while the Spanish crew rose up and took back their ship. The British prize crew were sent below to work the pumps, while Neptuno made anchor in Cadiz Bay. During the night the storm rose again, and Neptuno dragged her anchors and ran onshore. Lines were quickly passed between the ship and shore, and rafts were constructed to take men off the stricken ship. One raft made several trips to and from the shore, until it capsized, drowning several men.Over the next few days the remaining men, including the wounded Captain Valdés, were taken off by rafts and fishing boats. The abandonedNeptuno was soon pounded to pieces in the heavy seas, with the loss of around 20 men in her wreck. Neptuno was not the only ship to suffer this fate, a number of the captured British prizes were scuttled or left to be wrecked, while several of the ships that had accompanied Cosmao's sortie were lost. The Indomptable was lost after she grounded off Rota, as was the San Francisco de Asis, in Cadiz Bay. The Rayo attempted to anchor off San Lucar and ride out the storm, but rolled out her masts in the heavy seas. HMS Donegal came up, and being unable to resist, Rayo surrendered to her, but was driven on shore on 26 October and wrecked. Cosmao managed to retake only one other prize aside fromNeptuno, the 112-gun Santa Ana. Unlike Neptuno, the Santa Ana made it back to Cadiz. The remains of the French fleet were bottled up in Cadiz under Rear-Admiral Rosily, trapped there by the British blockade. The remaining ships were seized by the Spanish after they entered the war against France in 1808. One of the French ships taken was the 80-gun Neptune, which had fought at Trafalgar; the Spanish took her into their service, renaming her Neptuno, as a replacement for the ship lost in 1805. This new Neptuno served with the Spanish Navy until being broken up in 1820. http://www.todoababor.es/maquetas/mont.html Model construction , made following original plans by Romero Landa and Julian de Retamosa. When not there have been, have been replaced with Authorized and authenticated planes. For some details have been used elements Ildefonsinos series. The model is part of a technical study, as much as possible complete, the Montañes ship of the line, including: Obtaining Hydrostatic Curves, Curves Pantocarenas, Stability, Dynamic Parameters, Behavior between waves Efforts (Loads, Chopping, Tyres). The counting system is based on the ideas of Jorge Juan, all those aspects where possible. Only when there are empty " historical " they are using modern methods.
  13. I know I will start here an unpopular suggestion. Many guys just love the feeling of sitting in fat ducks blowing up everything up in range of their multiple max cannon decks. Nothing wrong with the feel of invincibility and power. But how often and how easy? And at the expense of what other game content? -- Let's face it: the enormous costs of building and maintaining a first rate ship-of-the-line is not portrayed in the game properly. Anyone with a dockyard large enough and sufficient warehouse stock can build one or several SOL a day, especially when he has the support of his clan. We see in the hand of some major clans more First Rates than whole nations had in 18th century, and this is just one theater of operations (the Caribbean), while those nations had to distribute their naval power over several theaters, mainly Europe. So what we get in the game is inflation of First Rates - determining always the same maxed out composition of battle fleets in port battles. And as the SOL are so cheap, we even see ganking groups consisting of SOLs, which is absolutely ridiculous nonsense in naval authenticity. Why? Because SOL are for navy battles only and they were extremely expensive. Their lacking speed did not make them suitable for economy war. The inflation of this overuse of fat ducks has undesirable side effects: other ship ranks become less significant. Almost nobody cares to build 2nd, 3rd rates - not to speak of 4th rate and lower, because fat ducks are so cheap and give the maximum fire power. So versatility suffers from the overuse. Tactics melt down to just brute force and nothing else matters. Who brings in more First Rates will win, who produces more a day keeps the upper hand. Short glimpse back into history: First Rates were so expensive that just for being able to add one to the royal fleet, all merchants and businesses of a city would collect their money and sponsor a single ship, which would then gratefully bear the name of that city, for example "Ville de Paris". Navy reformer Duke de Choiseul went around France to encourage cities and regions to follow the example so the King would have enough ships. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_ship_Ville_de_Paris_(1764) If historically correct, a reduction of number of SOLs in Naval Action would altogether prove to be profitable for gameplay. We would see more options for setting up fleets for various purposes and other rates than the First would see a renaissance. How could this be implemented? An idea would be to give each nation a maximum number of First Rates, distributed as slots between all clans of that nation. So, if there would be a max number of 25 First Rates for one nation and six clans with, say, more than ten active members in the last month, each clan would get the Royal allowance to contribute four First Rates and the rest (1) by one of the smaller clans. Maybe this would lead to less port battles or just another composition of battle fleets participating there. A single port battle would gain importance. That's fine, because so often they really did not take place in real life. Another idea, could be parallel with the first idea mentioned, has been touched already in this forum and I am all for it: having to pay maintenance for the largest ships, no matter if they are moored in docks or 'parked' in ship market. So you think twice before building them en masse. First Rates must cost daily money, and Second and Third Rates also, but to a lesser degree. Third idea in that context is to introduce a cost inflicting each time to the owning clan when their First Rate gets sunk. They were highly prestigious symbols of power. A loss of a First Rate ship-of-the-line was felt as national tragedy. Not like in this game, where you shrug your shoulders and simply build another one. This 'prestige loss' could be expressed by deduction of marks, victory or PvP, to all clan members whose clan had that national slot for a First Rate which got sunk. A malus for the clan comparison ladder. Effect: eagerness to keep the First Rate alive at all costs. Smaller ships would be commissioned to protect the valuable First Rate - that's absolutely historic. Second Effect: enemy is even more keen on sinking First Rates, because then it would have consequences for the losing side beyond just another ship gone.
  14. San Felipe 1690 The San Felipe, launched in 1690, was one of the most beautiful Spanish galleons of the XVII century. She was the lead ship of the famous Spanish Armada. The San Felipe displaced more than 1000 tons and was armed with 96 cannons, enabling her to take on the most formidable ships in the French and British navies. In 1705, she participated in a furious and heroic battle between 12 Spanish ships and 35 British ships but ended up at the bottom of the ocean with several tons of gold. Ship Plans: http://www.modelships.de/San_Felipe_1690_authenticity/San_Felipe_1690_authenticity.htm Building a ship: http://sanfelipe1690.blogspot.com/
  15. Navalus Magnus

    Too many 1st rates!?

    Recently there has been some arguing in this forum about 1st rates being used a way too much. Thier sheer number has been deemed unrealistic. I agree to that and thus suggest to implement a mechanic that regulates the numbers of 1st rates in NA: 1. Point of reference – how was the relation of 1st rates to other ships that participated in battles in the age of sail? Taking the Battle of Trafalgar as an example wikipedia states the following numbers: Type of ship* Numbers Percentage** 1st rate 7 9,5 % 2nd rate 11 15 % 3rd rate 38 52 % 4th rate 4 5,5 % 5th rate 9 12 % 6th rate 4 5,5 % Altogether 73 100 % *I’m using the ingame rating of NA here: 100+ canons = 1st rate, 80+ canons = 2nd rate, ... ** Values rounded and thus not exact. 2. Suggested mechanic: I’d implement a limit of how many 1st, 2nd and 3rd rates a player could own depending on his / her dockspace. This limit could be tied to the above mentioned percentage of ships in the Battle of Trafalgar for example. This would lead to the following restrictions (numbers not rounded): Dockspace Allowed 1st rates Allowed 2nd rates Allowed 3rd rates 5 0 0 2 8 0 1 4 11 1 1 5 14 1 2 7 17 1 2 8 20 1 3 10 With just one tow per day it would be impossible for all to get 1st rates out to sea wherever they want! And 3rd rates would actually become what they've been - sort of the backbone of the navy. Please comment and suggest other ideas of how to address the problem!
  16. HMS Henry Dunbar was a 64-gun second rate ship of the line of the English Royal Navy, originally built for the navy of the Commonwealth of England at Deptford, and launched in 1656. After the Restoration of the monarchy in 1660, she was renamed HMS Henry. By 1677 her armament had been increased to 82 guns. Henry was accidentally burnt in 1682.
  17. Time to start another ship, this time the HMS Barfleur (1768), a 90 gun second rate (later 98) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Barfleur_(1768) Took a while to create some clean plans from the ones I found (the best was distorted and the others were very low quality). Just blocking in the shape at the minute using the original plans (2 tier stern gallery) but will modify this to have the actual 3 tier stern gallery that it was built with
  18. Looking for more info and plans by Francis Sheldon Tre Løver, 1689, 68-74 Guns (24х24pd, 20х12pd12х6pd), Crew 529. ??? http://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=18324 Elefant, 1687, 24 Guns (18х6pd, 6х4pd), Crew up to 90. ??? http://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=17905 Let's keep going Dannebrog(1850) Unknown 5th rate? Bellona 1830 Rota 1822 gyldenløve 1669 hukkert 1760 12x4pd HVIDE ØRN 1798 30 Guns 24x8lb 6x8lb carronades Crew 180 brig ØRNEN 1842 28 Guns 16x18lb 12x1lb Crew 70 brig SEALARK 1843 12 Guns 4x32lb 8x32lb carronades
  19. Introducing HMS Soveriegn of the Seas a 102-gun first-rate ship of the line. One of the most famous ships in British naval history. Ordered in August 1634 on the personal initiative of King Charles I of England, who desired a giant Great Ship to be built and launched in 1637. As the second three-decked first-rate (the first three-decker being Prince Royal of 1610), she was the predecessor of Nelson's Victory. She had 118 gun ports and 102 guns was 230ft long and weighed 1,500 Tons. She was the most extravagantly decorated warship in the Royal Navy, completely adorned from stern to bow with gilded carvings against a black background.
  20. Snafu

    3D Modelling request

    Hi everyone, I stumbled on this forum thread by chance and im amazed by all the work & plans everyone is posting here. Im a game design student and we are creating a small gaming environment for the current module. Thats why I am looking for plans for the captains quarter/cabin. Were plans like these ever made or was the cabin derived from the general ship plans? What Im looking for would be cross sections and floorplan of just the captains quarters but so far ive only found build plans for whole ships Thanks in advance!
  21. 'Foudroyant' HMS Foudroyant was an 80-gun third rate of the Royal Navy, one of only two British-built 80-gun ships of the period (the other was HMS Caesar (1793). Foudroyant was built in the dockyard at Plymouth Dock (a.k.a. Devonport) and launched on 31 March 1798. Foudroyant served Nelson as his flagship from 6 June 1799 until the end of June 1801. Foudroyant had a long and successful career, and although she was not involved in any major fleet action, she did provide invaluable service to numerous admirals throughout her 17 years on active service. In her last years she became a training vessel for boys. Plans Design Her designer was Sir John Henslow. She was named after the 80-gun Foudroyant, which Swiftsure and Monmouth, both 70-gun ships, and Hampton Court (64 guns), had captured from the French on 28 February 1758. Foudroyant was a one-off design. She followed French practice of favoring large two-decked, third rates mounting 80 guns rather than the typical British preference for building three-decked second-rate ships mounting 98 guns. The two ship types, despite the difference in absolute gun numbers, had similar gun power but the British thought the second rate had a more imposing appearance and some advantages in battle, while they considered the 80 gun ship as usually faster and less 'leewardly'. Career: 12th October 1798: Fought at the Battle of Tory Island which was commanded by Commodore John Warren, during which the French 74 Hoche (renamed Donegal), and the frigates Bellone (renamed Proserpine), Embuscade and Coquille, were captured. (Capt. Thomas Byard) June 1799: Arrived at Palermo, where Nelson took her as his flagship. (Capt. Thomas Hardy) Nov 1799 - Feb 1800: At the blockade of Malta. (Capt. Edward Berry) Feb 1800: Captured the Généreux (Capt. Edward Berry) March 1800: Captured the Guillaume Tell (Capt. Edward Berry). The Guillaume Tell and Généreux were the only two remaining ships from the Battle of the Nile, and Nelson was delighted to have caught them. 1801: Assisted with the British landing at Egypt under Admiral Lord Keith. (Capt. Philip Beaver) 13th March 1806: With the London and Amazon, captured the French Marengo(74) and La Belle Poule(40). (Capt. John Chambers White) November 1807: Part of the blockade of the Tagus (Capt. Norborne Thompson). 1808: Rear-Admiral William Sidney Smith's flagship in the South American Station. 1812: Returned to England. 1820: Became a guardship at Plymouth. 1861: Became a training ship. 1892: She was sold to be exhibited at seaside resorts, but she became grounded and wrecked at Blackpool. But, aside from Victory, she was the only other of Nelson's ships to survive long enough to be photographed. Nelson's flagship as Rear-Admiral from June 1799 - July 1800 whilst he was in Palermo, although sometimes he just had his flag raised in her whilst he was ashore. It was aboard her that the Neapolitan Admiral was controversially tried and sentenced to death, and it is likely that Nelson and Emma Hamilton's daughter, Horatia, was conceived on board when Nelson took the Hamiltons to Malta in late April or early May 1800.
  22. Unfortunately for us Dutch, the main period on which Naval Action seems to focus comes after our 'Golden Age', but there's still plenty of Dutch stuff in the 18th century. We all know and love the 74 as the ultimate linesoldier of 18th century fleet battles and as such these ships should be well represented in game, several types should be available for all the major factions. The Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam has this large, very detailed model of the 74gun ship "Vrijheid". This ship will fit in the game's timeperiod beautifully and could be an important staple of Dutch fleets. We didn't build any first rates because of the shallow waters around our coasts, generally sticking to third rates and the occasional 2nd as a flagship, but we certainly knew how to slap together a good boat. The Vrijheid did not have a particularly magnificent career. Built in 1782, she fought at Kamperduin in '97 and was captured by the English. She served as a prison hulk for a few years before she was scrapped. But still, it's a solid 15 years of active service and one major battle. That's more than you can say about a great many of other warships. In any case, I think it'd be a wonderful addition to the game. Not just for some Dutch lovin', but 74s are awesome and you can never have enough of them. It's a large, multi-part model. While I don't know if there are any plans of the ship online or even in existence, I can't imagine the friendly people at the Rijksmuseum would be unwilling to cooperate with helping the devs to build a virtual specimen of her.
  23. D. Federico de Gravina y N

    Santa Ana class 112 guns spanish ship

    Crew: 1102 Weapons: 30 cañones de a 36 lbs 32 de a 24 lbs 32 de a 12 lbs 18 de a 8 lbs Drawings Wooden
  24. Sir_Wiener_Von_Snitzel

    Le Soleil Royal, 1670 (With Plans)

    Le Soleil Royal (1670) Displacement: 1,630 tonnes Length: 61 m (200 ft) Beam: 15.64 m (51.3 ft) Draught: 7.64 m (25.1 ft) Complement: 836 Armament: 104 guns:
  25. Hello Naval Action Captains, I am proposing adding in the USS Ohio circa 1820 which from what has been agreed on is the cutoff year for Naval Action with the addition of the Mercury. The USS Ohio has quite a service history for the United States as a SoL (Ship of the Line) and quite honestly is likely the single best SoL the United States ever made. USS Ohio History: Laid Down - 1817 @ New York Naval Yard Launched - May 30th 1820 Spent her early years in "ordinary" "refitted" for service in 1838 when she was needed, and served as the US Flagship to the Mediterranean for 2 years Went back to Boston for "ordinary" in 1840 Recommissioned in 1846 in the US - Mexico war assisting in the Siege of Vera Cruz, her guns were deployed and 336 of her crew were sent on the Tuxpan River Expedition. Shortly after the war with Mexico she was sent to the Pacific to keep order off California during the gold rush. She returned to Boston one last time in 1850, and served as a receiving ship until 1875. She was placed in "ordinary" for the last time in 1883, and was sold off. During her "breaking up" she refused to die, she broke from her mooring during a storm and became stranded. She was subsequently burned to the waterline and portions of her hull remain scattered and buried underneath the mud to this day (the shipwreck site is well documented). Armament as best replicated: 90 guns total 2 x 32lb Cannons Fore No guns Aft (Only windows) 24 x 42lb Carronades (Spar Deck) 32 x 32lb Cannons (Gun Deck) 32 x 42lb Cannons (Lower Deck) Standard Crew Compliment: 840 Men & Officers Why the USS Ohio (1820) aka Ohio II? The USS Ohio is regarded by many US Naval Historians as one of the most beautiful sailing warships ever afloat at the time of her launching. On top of that naval records and journals indicate she was an absolutely superb ship to sail constantly doing better than 12 knots and handling very much like a frigate, this information is extremely well documented. While she was built along side her sister ships she was designed slightly differently and to date is still regarded as the best SoL the United States had ever built, despite not seeing much action, even though she did see action in the Mexican-American war. Her armament is quite impressive to say the least, that is a LOT of 32 and 42lb guns, and for her sailing characteristics this makes her a very very formidable ship despite being on 104 guns when compared to the larger ships like the HMS Victory and the Santisima Trinidad's ridiculous amount of guns. Strong Armor, excellent sailing characteristics, powerful armament, this is what makes a good SoL, and I believe she has a place in Naval Action as there are no US SoL's and not many can either fit the timeline or were just poor performers. Historical Pictures: Artist Rendition of USS Ohio SoL (1820) "2 old salts" on the USS Ohio circa 1870 USS Ohio as a receiving ship in Boston circa 1870 USS Ohio (far right) in Boston photo circa 1870's Original Cedar "Hercules" figurehead from the USS Ohio on display today Stephen Myatts near 100% accurate (painstakingly recreated from historical documentation) model of the SoL USS Ohio (Left Side) Stephen Myatts near 100% accurate (painstakingly recreated from historical documentation) model of the SoL USS Ohio (Fore) Documented Sources: Naval Historical Foundation Nav Source Online (historical photos only) 3 Decks Naval Warfare History Wikipedia USS Ohio 1820 (GENERAL HISTORICAL INFORMATION ONLY) *NOTE: I would like to point out that the original naval register for her initial gun complement has yet to surface on the internet, I have heard that the US Navy does have some historical documents that can be requested at a cost (unsure of the cost) however this information has not been entirely verified. The gun compliment while being based on the 1837 public register does fit with the period that Naval Action is in, there are NO EXPLODING SHELL CANNONS on her as of 1837, these were traditional round shot cannons, the documentation is there to prove it. "NOPE IT'S OUT OF DATE" - Then remove the Mercury, this launched on the same year, month and within 11 DAYS of the launch of the Russian Brig Mercury, your arguement is invalid. "Can't fit 1837 guns on a 1820's ship, it's out of the timeline" - as long as they are the same guns that are limited in Naval Action and are the front loading, and fire only traditional round shot you can, and circa 1837 she was fitted for exactly that, and ONLY that. The only reason she has no earlier documentation is that she was in "ordinary" until she was needed to be sailed. Again argument invalid. Yes she pushes the limits of the timeline, no argument there, however she does meet all the requirements and in my honest opinion she would make an excellent addition to the game.
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