Jump to content
Game-Labs Forum

disc

Members2
  • Content Count

    208
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    2

disc last won the day on April 28

disc had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

283 Excellent

About disc

  • Rank
    Midshipman

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Believe this was typically the US approach. I'm not sure it was considered a huge disadvantage, for whatever that's worth. I'm not sure the difference in ROF was quite as pronounced as in the game, though it's a bit tough to say.
  2. The sheer existence of the Lost Cause myth should lay the "history is written by the victors" idea to rest. Since you do seem to be a fan of WWII Germany, you should know that much of the US military's historical manuscripts on the Soviet-German war were written by Fritz Halder. This is the former general who wrote the evil Commissar Order... unsurprisingly, he is the source of many discredited "Clean Wehrmacht" myths. In regard to German warships, Koop and Schmolke are excellent sources, and they served in the German WWII navy. They specifically point out the atrocious reliability o
  3. Nice point, I think this would be a great visual improvement Whole compartment system is a little contrived. There's no side compartments, wing spaces, double bottom spaces, etc. Some ships did have boilers and engines in three central rooms, but there were lots of other arrangements!
  4. For what it is worth, a quad turret can successfully bracket a target by itself. The idea is that the next salvo is aimed by checking the farthest and nearest shell splashes from the last salvo. The splashes should surround the target. If the most distant shot in the salvo is on the near side of the target, then the salvo was short and the next one needs to fire at a longer distance. If the closest shot is on the far side of the target, then the salvo was long and the next one needs to fire at a shorter distance. When the extremes are on either side of the target, then probably the shoote
  5. Seconded, this is a good question. Deck armor can be calculated about the same way, length times average width times thickness times density of steel (which is about 8g/mL, or 0.29lb/in^2). Transverse bulkheads would work the same as belts. Barbettes and turrets can be a bit complex, but an easy approach is to assign a diameter to each and treat them as cylinders and rectangular prisms. Then calculate armor weight based on surface area. This technique can be extended to conning towers and steering gear boxes. There would be some snarls with this approach. First, belt length an
  6. It is assuredly intentional. Those numbers neatly match with Imperial to metric conversions. One modern inch is equal to 25.4mm. The game ticks up by 0.1in at a time, giving increments of either 2.5mm or 2.6mm with rounding. 2in is thus 50.8mm, 3in 76.2mm, 4in 101.6mm, and so on. The example image "124.5mm" and "200.7mm" are rounded conversions from 4.9in and 7.9in, respectively.
  7. I think it may expand the "flagship near" and "far" radii. But I have never tested this. Often not worth it, I'd agree
  8. Nick Thomadis is the lead game designer. Maksim Zasov is his boss. Thomadis may have special privileges within the company, though. Game Labs is based in Kyiv, Ukraine. Total of 24 employees. Believe Thomadis works out of Athens. There are 2-4 other developers for Ultimate Admiral: Dreadnoughts, probably in Greece or eastern Europe. Stillfront is headquartered in Stockholm, Sweden, and owns a broad number of internationally placed semi-independent video game studios. Most are focused on a F2P model. This deal was probably attractive to Game Labs because it provides a large amoun
  9. Based on the compartment viewer in battle, each ship is divided evenly into seven longitudinal parts. The first two and last two parts are covered by the extended belt. The middle three parts are covered by the main belt. I am less sure about the decks, but I think they cover the same areas respectively. I don't know how the extended belt is actually laid out. My suspicion is that it is considered to be at about 45 degree angles from the centerline, so that the belts form a hexagon in plan. It is unclear where the magazines are, but I think the idea posited is that they are directly
  10. Missing two other scenarios: One side has a spotter plane and the other does not. One ship in a division can see the enemy, but the others cannot due to smoke etc. The blind ships can get spotting data from the one in visual contact using special equipment.
  11. We'll have to see how this current patch pans out. I am especially hopeful that the AI and fire changes will be useful. I'd rather development be slow than half-baked. I strongly suspect this patch focuses more on models because of division of labor. IE the programmer(s) is/are doing a ton of campaign stuff, where perhaps the modeler(s) don't. That said, I would like to see more pre-Dreadnought hulls. They are a bit restricted right now, both in number and customizability. I am not sure gunnery is that flawed. The armor and damage model certainly is, but the statistical app
  12. What sort of tradeoffs did it make for the speed? If the answer is "not many," then that's not too ideal! My own experience has been that the AI's fast "battleships" tend to be very fragile, but of course I don't know what you saw.
  13. Well, HMS Princess Royal was completed 1912 and made 28 knots. HMS Renown was completed 1916 and made 32 knots. So, sounds pretty close... for a battlecruiser, anyway. Though Princess Royal had armor broadly comparable to battleships of about 10 years prior. I'm still a bit uncertain how the AI makes range decisions, but I have seen them begin circling the player fleet if they are free to maneuver. They sometimes go well outside weapons range, and the destroyers -- not shooting or being shot at -- will launch smoke, giving away exact position and approximate heading. I think there
  14. It appears that a partially flooded compartment always will be pumped out eventually. However, if the water reaches the top of the compartment, the space is permanently flooded and can never be emptied. I believe this is why ships can recover from extremely extensive flooding. I am not sure if structural integrity (grey, green, yellow, red) is a factor. Weird mechanic.
×
×
  • Create New...