Jump to content
Game-Labs Forum
Sign in to follow this  
  • entries
    4
  • comment
    1
  • views
    1,451

About this blog

gun crews

Entries in this blog

 

Thickness

The frame is made of one wood, commonly a tough, dense wood which is resistant to rot. Some use cheaper woods, oversized to obtain the same stiffness (and similar weight) to the more common woods. The outer planking is a wood type commonly chosen for toughness and resistance to rot. Can be different below and above the waterline. Inner planking varies more. It can have differences below and 'between and above' the ports on each gun deck, and in the Orlop and Hold. Masts, spars and yards

maturin

maturin

 

Tacking times

Surcouf gave French 80-gun ship (Sané design most probably) tacking times for comparison: Speed / head-sails aback / head to wind / full tack to tack 2.5 / 2'30" / 10' / 13' 3 / 1'52" / 9'22" / 12' 3.5 / 1'33" / 8'07" / 11' 4 / 1'30" / 7'30" / 10' 4.5 / 1'30" / 6'50" / 9'10" 5 / 1'20" / 6'15" / 8'30" 6 /  1'15" / 5' / 7' 7 / 1'15" / 5' / 6'30"  

maturin

maturin

 

gun crews

30 x 32lb @ 14 per "crew" = 210 men 28 x 24lb @ 12 per "crew" = 168 men 30 x 12lb 9ft @ 10 per "crew" = 150 men 2 x 12lb 8.5ft @ 10 per "crew" = 10 men 2 x 68lb 5.33ft @ 10 per "crew" = 10 men 12 x 12lb 7.5ft @ 10 per "crew" = 60 men   All told: 608 men for the great guns, plus men in the powder magazines and gangways to provide powder to the three decks. Each deck would normally be served from one magazine and gangway on a ship of the line to reduce the risk of accidents caused by improper al

maturin

maturin

Sign in to follow this  
×
×
  • Create New...