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Oberon74

Best Naval adventure books

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I read a lot in the other threads about Jack Aubrey and Richard Bolitho.  Hornblower gets some love as well, but nobody references Alan Lewrie.  This is a series of 19(?) books starting with him as a Midshipman and for me, the best (bar none) naval adventure series.  It has a blend of racy humour and highly technical sailing/combat that should appeal to every player of this game and the Devs should be using it as a text!.  For all of you who have not experienced this series, I suggest you start immediately.  The first book is "The Kings Coat", written by Dewie Lambden. 

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i have read some books from

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Monsarrat

The master mariner

His final work, unfinished at the time of his death but published in its incomplete form, was a two-volume historical novel titled The Master Mariner. Based on the legend of the Wandering Jew, it told the story of an Elizabethan English seaman who, as punishment for a terrible act of cowardice, is doomed to sail the world's seas until the end of time. His hero participates in critical moments in history; Monsarrat used him to illustrate the central role of seamen

in dutch it is called eeuwig roept de horizon

it was a very interesting read and more to the story of naval action than you can imagine   

https://www.amazon.com/Nicholas-Monsarrat/e/B000AP98C6

all his work: https://www.amazon.com/Nicholas-Monsarrat/e/B000AP98C6

 

also one of my favorit writers and also a good writer i think is :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Reeman

 

Reeman's debut novel, A Prayer for the Ship, was published in 1958. Reeman is most famous for his series of Napoleonic naval stories, whose central character is Richard Bolitho, and, later, his nephew, Adam Bolitho. Reeman also wrote a series of novels about several generations of the fictional Blackwood family who served in the Royal Marines from the 1850s to the 1970s, and a non-fiction account of his own Second World War experiences, D-Day: A Personal Reminiscence (1984). He used the pseudonym Alexander Kent (the real name of friend and naval officer who died during the Second World War) for his Bolitho novels and his real name for his other novels and non-fiction.

Edited by Thonys
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10 hours ago, Thonys said:

i have read some books from

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicholas_Monsarrat

The master mariner

His final work, unfinished at the time of his death but published in its incomplete form, was a two-volume historical novel titled The Master Mariner. Based on the legend of the Wandering Jew, it told the story of an Elizabethan English seaman who, as punishment for a terrible act of cowardice, is doomed to sail the world's seas until the end of time. His hero participates in critical moments in history; Monsarrat used him to illustrate the central role of seamen

in dutch it is called eeuwig roept de horizon

it was a very interesting read and more to the story of naval action than you can imagine   

https://www.amazon.com/Nicholas-Monsarrat/e/B000AP98C6

all his work: https://www.amazon.com/Nicholas-Monsarrat/e/B000AP98C6

 

also one of my favorit writers and also a good writer i think is :

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Reeman

 

Reeman's debut novel, A Prayer for the Ship, was published in 1958. Reeman is most famous for his series of Napoleonic naval stories, whose central character is Richard Bolitho, and, later, his nephew, Adam Bolitho. Reeman also wrote a series of novels about several generations of the fictional Blackwood family who served in the Royal Marines from the 1850s to the 1970s, and a non-fiction account of his own Second World War experiences, D-Day: A Personal Reminiscence (1984). He used the pseudonym Alexander Kent (the real name of friend and naval officer who died during the Second World War) for his Bolitho novels and his real name for his other novels and non-fiction.

There were only 3 of the Blackwood novels, right?  I remember wishing for more

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