Jump to content
Game-Labs Forum
Fluffy Fishy

The Venetian Arsenal: From City-State to World Power

Recommended Posts

Here is a nice video looking at the Venetian arsenal, it only really goes into the basics and doesn't really cover the period after Lepanto but its still a really nice introduction to the facility. Also it is a little misleading at the end where it downplays the complexes importance into the 19th century. Enjoy :)
 

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Si, está bien, pero potencia mundial no, es más exacto que la denominación de potencia mediterránea.

Sí, está bien, pero el poder mundial no es correcto, el nombre del poder mediterráneo es más preciso. In addition, the video has historically wrong information.

Edited by pepepotamo

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 The venetians had a great comercial monopoly in the Mediterranean Sea but couldn't rival with Spanish empire and Portuguese empire in the rest of Europe. When the portuguese reached India by sea and opened another door in Europe for the spices, was a big blow on Venetia comercial power.

  Disguised venetian agents travelled to India in the 4th Armada to India and their objective was to sabotage the portuguese and Cochin relations and to forge 5 big cannons to Calicut forces (Zamorin declared war on Cochin and their allies, the portuguese garrison).

 

"The Battle of Cochin, sometimes referred as the Second Siege of Cochin, was a series of confrontations, between March and July 1504, fought on land and sea, principally between the Portuguese garrison at Cochin, allied to the Trimumpara Raja, and the armies of the Zamorin of Calicut and vassal Malabari states.

The celebrated heroics of the tiny Portuguese garrison, led by Duarte Pacheco Pereira, fended off an invading army several hundred times bigger. It proved a humiliating defeat for the Zamorin of Calicut. He not only failed to conquer Cochin, but his inability to crush the tiny opposition undermined the faith of his vassals and allies. The Zamorin lost much of his traditional authority over the Malabar states of India in the aftermath. The preservation of Cochin secured the continued presence of the Portuguese in India."

 

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×