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Wind

Story of a Cursed USS Constitution

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First of all, take note of that ship paint theme. (would be nice to have the same in NA) Dark black with British yellow, no wonder that ship is cursed )) Also, Constitution in NA looks boxy compared to this model. 

DSC_9216.jpg

THERE’S A MODEL SHIP AT the National Museum of the United States Navy that has a history so creepy, that nobody in the U.S. government wants the toy boat in their office.


“We call it the ‘Black Constitution,’” said Capt. Henry J. Hendrix, the outgoing director of Naval History and Heritage Command, as he gives a tour of the museum, part of Washington’s Navy Yard. The “black ship,” as it’s also called, is a replica of the USS Constitution, a relic from the 1790s that remains in Boston.


“It was returned to us from the White House because that [USS] Constitution had sat in the office of President John Kennedy, and then was in the press secretary’s office with James Brady, and then after both of them were shot, the White House said, ‘We want to send this back,’” Hendrix explained. “No one wants to take the risk … I wouldn’t have it in my office, for instance.”


So instead the boat remains behind a glass case in the museum – what used to be the old Naval Gun Factory – on the same campus where the September 2013 Navy Yard shooting occurred. (The public can tour the facility if prior arrangements are made.)

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It’s Hendrix’s last full day on the job, after serving “26 years, two months, 17 days” in the Navy. He’s ending his career at the helm of the unit charged with looking after its archives, artifacts, art, and museums. The captain, a history buff who holds two master’s degrees and a Ph.D., came on board after the Navy Inspector General put out a 2011 report saying that the Navy’s history was endangered: There was mold growing on some documents and even more documents were piling up. The entire museum in Washington needed to be seriously upgraded, explained the Navy Times, all thanks to being "chronically underfunded."


“But literally we have undertaken what we call band-aid solutions,” Hendrix said, ticking off improvements like upgrading temperature and humidity control in the museum. “It’s a lot of minutiae – that’s quite frankly one of the good things about having a Navy captain installed because we’re into minutiae.”


Progress has been made. On the same day as Hendrix’s retirement, the Naval History and Heritage Command is being awarded a Meritorious Unit Commendation for getting the archives back on track.
And much has been discovered going through the documents, microfilm, and crates.
“We came across one of the first radios to be installed in the White House,” Hendrix said. The reason it was "Navy" was because its twin resided on the presidential yacht, the USS Mayflower.
After the USS Mayflower, in presidential yacht history, came the USS Sequoia. “Now these are the benches of the Sequoia, see over there?” Hendrix pointed. “So, literally, Harry Truman and John Kennedy sat on those benches.”
And speaking of presidents’ bottoms, Hendrix then pointed out Abe Lincoln's old chair.
“We believe that he sat in that when he drafted the Emancipation Proclamation,” Hendrix said.
The back story with that chair is that it came off the USS Princeton, a ship that suffered a major explosion in 1844 when one of its guns – dubbed the “Peacemaker” – blew up, killing the country’s secretary of the Navy and secretary of state. Much of the furniture came off, including the chair, which ended up in the building we today call the Old Executive Office Building.

2qre4Hw.jpg

Edited by Wind
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11 hours ago, Hethwill said:

Wouldn't mind that paint in game :) 

Nice snippet btw.

I think we all missed some details. It's already in the game apparently, but it's not yellow it's orangeish. Gunport doors must be painted as well to achieve Nelson Chequer effect imho. Chequer paint theme is a must! I still can't believe such important detail was missed.  @admin Also, how about half and half paint (half black and half yellow?)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nelson_Chequer

zs7SVyY.png

DSC_9216.jpg

Also, Red Paint themes would be nice. P.S. that is USS Constitution

pfR7ZX4.jpg

Edited by Wind

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30 minutes ago, Wind said:

First of all, take note of that ship paint theme. (would be nice to have the same in NA) Dark black with British yellow, no wonder that ship is cursed )) Also, Constitution in NA looks boxy compared to this model. 

DSC_9216.jpg

THERE’S A MODEL SHIP AT the National Museum of the United States Navy that has a history so creepy, that nobody in the U.S. government wants the toy boat in their office.


“We call it the ‘Black Constitution,’” said Capt. Henry J. Hendrix, the outgoing director of Naval History and Heritage Command, as he gives a tour of the museum, part of Washington’s Navy Yard. The “black ship,” as it’s also called, is a replica of the USS Constitution, a relic from the 1790s that remains in Boston.


“It was returned to us from the White House because that [USS] Constitution had sat in the office of President John Kennedy, and then was in the press secretary’s office with James Brady, and then after both of them were shot, the White House said, ‘We want to send this back,’” Hendrix explained. “No one wants to take the risk … I wouldn’t have it in my office, for instance.”


So instead the boat remains behind a glass case in the museum – what used to be the old Naval Gun Factory – on the same campus where the September 2013 Navy Yard shooting occurred. (The public can tour the facility if prior arrangements are made.)

-----------------------------------------------
It’s Hendrix’s last full day on the job, after serving “26 years, two months, 17 days” in the Navy. He’s ending his career at the helm of the unit charged with looking after its archives, artifacts, art, and museums. The captain, a history buff who holds two master’s degrees and a Ph.D., came on board after the Navy Inspector General put out a 2011 report saying that the Navy’s history was endangered: There was mold growing on some documents and even more documents were piling up. The entire museum in Washington needed to be seriously upgraded, explained the Navy Times, all thanks to being "chronically underfunded."


“But literally we have undertaken what we call band-aid solutions,” Hendrix said, ticking off improvements like upgrading temperature and humidity control in the museum. “It’s a lot of minutiae – that’s quite frankly one of the good things about having a Navy captain installed because we’re into minutiae.”


Progress has been made. On the same day as Hendrix’s retirement, the Naval History and Heritage Command is being awarded a Meritorious Unit Commendation for getting the archives back on track.
And much has been discovered going through the documents, microfilm, and crates.
“We came across one of the first radios to be installed in the White House,” Hendrix said. The reason it was "Navy" was because its twin resided on the presidential yacht, the USS Mayflower.
After the USS Mayflower, in presidential yacht history, came the USS Sequoia. “Now these are the benches of the Sequoia, see over there?” Hendrix pointed. “So, literally, Harry Truman and John Kennedy sat on those benches.”
And speaking of presidents’ bottoms, Hendrix then pointed out Abe Lincoln's old chair.
“We believe that he sat in that when he drafted the Emancipation Proclamation,” Hendrix said.
The back story with that chair is that it came off the USS Princeton, a ship that suffered a major explosion in 1844 when one of its guns – dubbed the “Peacemaker” – blew up, killing the country’s secretary of the Navy and secretary of state. Much of the furniture came off, including the chair, which ended up in the building we today call the Old Executive Office Building.

2qre4Hw.jpg

https://uk.search.yahoo.com/yhs/search?hspart=arh&hsimp=yhs-001&type=zxy_cb71d42d18d6909c2f&param1=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%3D%3D&param2=Nax5LGN5LGF5&p=hms+victory+paint+scheme

Ironically that British Yellow was not worn by HMS Victory at Trafalgar, she originally wore a delicate shade of pink! Nelson's Chequerboard scheme was actually quite new at Trafalgar, and no doubt cost Captain Hardy a small fortune as he had to pay for the upkeep of his ship. This in the main was warships were painted black as black paint was cheap, Gold leaf as found on some warship's transoms was very expensive and gave way to Yellow paint, the pink paint would also have been expensive, although Black Paint may have been provided by the Admiralty a ships upkeep was largely borne by her Captain. It is not known if Nelson personally contributed to her upkeep, but as the flagship a high standard would have been expected and Nelson would almost certainly of had his say on colours worn by his flagship and the ships under his command. 

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