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Captain Lust

Mast repairs

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Captain Lust    480

Is demasting worth it compared to chain spam in terms of % of sail repaired per rig repar pop in battle? Do masts need more of the reps than only damaged sail? Anyone has the exact numbers?

#letmejustfixthat30metersolidwoodenpoleevery7minutesrighthereincombat

 

Edited by Captain Lust

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Willis PVP2    212
17 minutes ago, Captain Lust said:

Is demasting worth it compared to chain spam in terms of % of sail repaired per rig repar pop in battle? Do masts need more of the reps than only damaged sail? Anyone has the exact numbers?

#letmejustfixthat30metersolidwoodenpoleevery7minutesrighthereincombat

 

From a realism perspective, I think that mast repairs should not happen at all in the fight, there is no way you could jury rig a lower mast in a battle. Perhaps you could jury rig an upper mast (topmast or topgallant) if you pulled away from the combat long enough....

 

As a demaster, and to balance gameplay, I think that mast repairs should be limited to 1 time per fight: if you get demasted, you can select "repair sails" and you will get some masts back, and maybe some sails back. If you lose masts again, you can't repair them. You can repair sails again, but not masts.

 

Currently, I'll choose demasting over chaining sometimes if I can snap the masts relatively easily, since you can take down sail % faster that way (if you can demast efficiently).

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The only damage control that would have been done in action would have been leak stoppage and fire fighting. A large proportion of the crew would be required to re-step even part of a mast, tackle had to rigged to lift it and the yards/spars to be replaced. Premade yards and spars were carried, usually on deck for that purpose.

While they could replace yards and spars relatively easily the work was slow and dangerous, stepping a mast required the ship to be on an even keel which always meant beaching and shoring up, or a dockyard.

If you had sufficient height left on a broken mast it was possible to jury rig but the sail area would be small, probably so small that steerage way would be almost unattainable in big ships and was usually carried out to assist in towing.

Dismasting, by and large was a French tactic. their preference was to disable an opponent, which left them the options of disabling another ship, and returning to board later in the battle or disengaging knowing that pursuit would be difficult for their opponent.  The British were more likely to dismast a trader and try to keep the hull intact for the value of a prize, in a battle they were more likely to hit the hulls to decimate the crews before boarding, in that regard I think that the French actually come very close to the tactics used by the French navy during the Napoleonic wars,  Like the French and British it is understandable that Pirates would prefer to cause minimal damage, both to retain value of the cargo and give them an additional ship to ravage the sea lanes.

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Captain Lust    480
7 hours ago, Sir Lancelot Holland said:

The only damage control that would have been done in action would have been leak stoppage and fire fighting. A large proportion of the crew would be required to re-step even part of a mast, tackle had to rigged to lift it and the yards/spars to be replaced. Premade yards and spars were carried, usually on deck for that purpose.

I would be fine with the ablility to partially repair the mast but not the whole thing to 100% over and over and over again.... it's just retarded.

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Not gonna comment on the repairs aspect.  Chain spam is easier to do, but that only applies a generic speed reduction to the target.  Dismasting tends to seriously unbalance a ship's rig, significantly limiting the ship's maneuverability via manual sail control.  This was true in real life too, for example the five-masted clipper Preussen lost its foremast in a collision, and became unmanageable and sank as a result.

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