Jump to content
Game-Labs Forum
Sign in to follow this  
Capt Hornblower

Nelson's Victory

Recommended Posts

Nothing in that video talks about the Victories agility at sea.  

 

 

I will add everywhere I read about the victory that posted speeds on pegged it at around 8-11knots

 

 

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Victory

 

http://www.militaryfactory.com/ships/detail-page-2.asp?ship_id=HMS-Victory

 

The video doesn't but some of the records like to state that the Victory could quite happily keep to a line of thirds, there are also numerous accounts of the ability of Sir Thomas Slade as a naval architect suggesting he was by some weight the finest shipwright of the time, surpassing even his French contemporaries. There has to be something said of someone who designed 8 of the 27 line ships used by the British at Trafalgar and another 2 used by the French.

Edited by Fluffy Fishy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The video doesn't but some of the records like to state that the Victory could quite happily keep to a line of thirds, there are also numerous accounts of the ability of Sir Thomas Slade as a naval architect suggesting he was by some weight the finest shipwright of the time, surpassing even his French contemporaries. There has to be something said of someone who designed 8 of the 27 line ships used by the British at Trafalgar and another 2 used by the French.

 

What records?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There has to be something said of someone who designed 8 of the 27 line ships used by the British at Trafalgar and another 2 used by the French.

 

 

Especially considering that Slade´s ships were 40 to 50 years old at the time of Trafalgar. And he certainly was one of the most talented shipwrights in the 18th century, if I had to choose a Top 3, that´d be Slade, af Chapman and Blaise Ollivier (followed by Pangallo and Sané)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What records?

 

There are quite a few records kept in the archives of the royal maritime museum and royal dockyards. There are also a few mentions that it was the most agile ship of its size in the British fleet, being able to turn more readily than any of its contemporary 3 deckers and almost keeping up to the 2 deckers when it came to attempting sharp manoeuvres.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Especially considering that Slade´s ships were 40 to 50 years old at the time of Trafalgar. And he certainly was one of the most talented shipwrights in the 18th century, if I had to choose a Top 3, that´d be Slade, af Chapman and Blaise Ollivier (followed by Pangallo and Sané)

Why would you choose Ollivier over Sane? I can find precious little information about his ships, as opposed to his written work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Because Ollivier introduced the classical frigate design into european ship-building, 'his' apple-shaped hull was used until the late 1810s and a lot of prominent french shipwrights studied under him at Brest (J.-L. Coulomb, Deslaurier, Tupinier, Geoffroy and, of course, his son, J.-L. Ollivier). He also was the first shipwright to accurately calculate displacement with the trapezoid method (1727, Le Fleuron).

 

His Remarques sur la Marine des Anglois et Hollandois is well worth a read :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×