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Questions for the Historians

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1 hour ago, Haratik said:

What was the difference between a squadron, a flotilla, and a fleet in the game's time period?

The difference is in that are the amount of ships used, the type of in that group and sometimes also the Flagship type,

Squadrons are primairly frigates and corvettes and other small ships. Although the English used squadrons to indicate a Combatgroup of a Mainly SoL group but it also slightly differs from the regions they were operating in

Flotilla's could be a combatgroup with a mix of frigates and SoL up to 2nd serving as a flagship

Fleet are groups of ships constitend of at least 20-25 ships with main SoL with a support group of frigates

the exact numbers of each type could vary between nations

Edited by pietjenoob

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In France we divide as follows:

A squadron is subdivided into three divisions bearing the color to which it is attached.

A detachment is attached to a division, the division is attached to a squadron, which is attached to a naval army.

So a group of ships and named according to the number of ships that compose it.

3 squadrons = a naval army
1 squadron = from 9 to 26 vessels
1 division = from 3 to 8
1 detachment = 2

The word "fleet" is used (always in France) for:

- a considerable number of merchant ships of the same nation
- if the fleet is escorted, it takes the name of convoy
- in the navy, the word "fleet" means all floating vessels, near to fight or can be near quickly.

We are talking about the "Mediterranean fleet", "fleet of the North", "fleet of the Pacific", etc.

Edited by Surcouf

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3 hours ago, Surcouf said:

 

well It would be nice to know what kind of( name) structure we use in naval action actually 

or just imaginary  : naval action structure 

 

Edited by Thonys

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On 2/12/2018 at 6:19 AM, Surcouf said:

In France we divide as follows:

A squadron is subdivided into three divisions bearing the color to which it is attached.

A detachment is attached to a division, the division is attached to a squadron, which is attached to a naval army.

So a group of ships and named according to the number of ships that compose it.

3 squadrons = a naval army
1 squadron = from 9 to 26 vessels
1 division = from 3 to 8
1 detachment = 2

The word "fleet" is used (always in France) for:

- a considerable number of merchant ships of the same nation
- if the fleet is escorted, it takes the name of convoy
- in the navy, the word "fleet" means all floating vessels, near to fight or can be near quickly.

We are talking about the "Mediterranean fleet", "fleet of the North", "fleet of the Pacific", etc.

Thanks for expanding on this Surcouf.  I've always had a general idea on what each was, but every nation has a different idea of what the composition is, and how much makes up each.

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Yes, it's just for France. In Germany, Spain, England, America, etc. it's different. The names and the number of vessels are not the same, but it gives a good idea of the differences.

I add that if a squadron or division is composed only of frigates, we speak of "light" squadron and "light" division. Same names if they are lower vessels than 74-gun ships.

There is also a color code (as in other nations). A naval army with three squadrons:

The 1st: white
2nd: white and blue
3rd: blue

It takes three divisions to make one squadron, each division has the same color as its squadron, but on different masts for the admirers.

Example:
The 1st squadron: white mark
- The 1st division: white mark on the mainmast
- The 2nd division: white mark on the foremast
- The 3rd division: white mark on the mizzen mast

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