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Data on breeching rope strain

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Does anyone have much data on the strain on the breeching rope, I saw some information about the 42lb cannons creating a force of about 16 tons and was wondering if people had more information on this topic.

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There is a lot of information but not what I am looking for, thank you anyway :). I am looking specifically for the backward force, you see the ropes holding the cannon in place in the picture, I am looking for some information of how much force they had to stand up to. It was a massive amount, be it for a very short space of time. I am just curious if anyone has looked into it really.

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then the formula for recoil is needed right?

 

Pf+Pp=0

 

where 3c4048cb1d66aa4a1b5119d3b242fce9.png is the momentum of the cannon and d7bc589c398b48e1e067fa1eb5de5f3e.png is the momentum of the projectile. In other words, immediately after firing, the momentum of the cannon is equal and opposite to the momentum of the projectile.

Edited by Capt. Rice
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At the risk of sounding uneducated, I'm sorry but that sounds a bit too much science for me to cope with, are you saying you can work that out from the data on the link you posted? How does the momentum reflect on the backwards force, I get the feeling its more complex than that formula shows, I am out of my depth.

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well for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. It is just that simple. I think the complexity comes in when you have several forces working on the ropes at the same time. Not only the cannon firing but also the heel of the ship the roughness of the seas and so on. 

Edited by Young
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The ratio of recoil length *unrestrained* to recoil energy suggests that the average resistance to motion from the trucks and axletrees is around 1/10th of the gun weight.

This reduces the required force the breeching arrests considerably in standard conditions.
Hot guns, double shot and 'jumpy' carriage design increase energy or reduce the frictional retardation, increasing the strain on breeching.

Lighter ordnance has more recoil energy than heavier ordnance (one reason for not using medium pieces on ship - and a reason for the dislike of carronades and light guns). A 32lb carronade and 9lb gun use a similar powder charge, but the 32lb carronade has the same recoil energy as the 32lb long gun, several times more harsh than the 9lb gun.

Edited by Lieste
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well for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. It is just that simple. I think the complexity comes in when you have several forces working on the ropes at the same time. Not only the cannon firing but also the heel of the ship the roughness of the seas and so on. 

 

Not to mention the drag on the rollers, force delivered to the hull of the ship due to cannon angle, slip and settle travel of the cannon in the frame,  the difference in velocity due to weight, gradual application of force on the ropes as pulley slack was taken up, ejected material, (the non-powder plugs and such, and any force channels due to barrel design.

 

(did they do anything like that last one in the design like a recoil-less riffle?)

Edited by KrakkenSmacken

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