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Found 16 results

  1. Hi everyone! Since everyone here has presumably some interest in the Late Unpleasantness, I thought it might be fun to try and make a thread for fun, interesting, or thought provoking questions about the Civil War! So I'm thinking this thread could be that! If you've got a question about the war or its aftermath, post away! If you've got an answer to a question, give a post! All I ask is that any responses are respectful in two ways. 1) Respectful of the person who posted the answer and/or question. 2) Respectful of academia. This one is a bit tricky, but basically I think any answer posted here should strictly rely on primary sources and reliable, peer-reviewed academic secondary sources. Basically, if you're quoting pseudo-intellectuals like Thomas D. Lorenzo, or outright anti-intellectual works such as "The Politically Incorrect Guide to the Civil War" then you're in the wrong thread, Buster ! Think carefully about where you are getting your info! If this thread is a hit, then let's keep it smart! So, fire away! How did Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation really affect slavery? What was the difference between "anti-slavery" and "abolition?" When did the Civil War truly end? What kinds of rifles did men use in the war? Which battle was really the most important and why? Can we interpret Grand Strategy in the Civil War from the lens of Clausewitz? Was the Civil War a Modern War? Was it a Total War?Why did the "preservation of the Union" matter so much to Americans? What were the Confederates fighting for? Was Chamberlain's moustache really that sexy!? (it was) Was the Civil War really caused by the institution of slavery? (it was) So, if anyone is interested, pop a question!
  2. On May 11, 1865 in Palmito Ranch, Texas, Colonel Theodore Barrett elected to send a detachment of United States Colored Infantry and Texas Cavalry under Lieutenant-Colonel David Branson on a raid. Their mission was to attack a Confederate outpost at White Ranch, destroy their supplies and capture their horses. This was in direct violation of a previously established gentleman's agreement between Federal forces and Rebel forces in Texas. In February, the Union and Confederate forces, recognizing the war was nearly at an end, had agreed to an informal ceasefire. Hitherto May 11, this was recognized by both parties. Why Barrett violated this order is a bit of a mystery. His detractors claimed it was because he wished to seize military glory before the war was over, his supporters claimed it was to resupply by the supplies of the enemy. Regardless of the reason, Barrett was about to join the last battle of America's Civil War. The movement of Branson's raiding party was delayed until May 12, whereupon the troops at last made their way to the Rebel outpost at White Ranch, only to find it abandoned. the movement, having taken all day and night, exhausted Branson's men. Branson allowed them to rest. At 8:30, Branson was alerted to Rebel troops, who had made camp at Palmito Ranch. The Rebels had been alerted to the Federal raid (possibly by Rebels or Imperial Mexicans over the border) and were preparing to counter-attack. Branson decided to meet the rebels directly, and so essayed an attack on Palmito Ranch. Branson's men skirmished to Palmito Ranch and then broke the Rebel lines there. Branson's success was short-lived. A larger Confederate force soon made its way to Palmito Ranch and Branson was compelled to retreat to White's Ranch, where he entreated Barrett for reinforcements. Barrett received word from his beleaguered subordinate and immediately took action. Branson gathered the 200 men of the 34th Indiana and moved quickly for Palmito Ranch. Barett and the 34th arrived on the morning of May 13, 1865. Like Branson before them, they initially saw success, pushing back the Confederate raiders and finishing the immolation of Rebel supplies begun by Branson the previous day. Having accomplished these goals, Barrett and the 34th began to bivouac. It was then that Confederate Colonel John "Rip" Ford attacked with 200 Confederate Texans. The Federals formed battle lines but, without artillery support, could not hold against Ford's horse artillery. Barrett, recognizing the futility of the Union position, conducted an orderly retreat, keeping up a strong skirmishing line in the process. As the Federals fell back, Union Private John J. Williams was struck and killed. This was his first and only battle. John J. Williams was the last of 750 000 to die in the American Civil War. 100 Union infantrymen were taken prisoner. The Union suffered 12 wounded and 4 captured in addition to their 100 captured men. The Rebels suffered 3 captured and an unsubstantiated number of wounded. No Confederates were recorded as killed. Officially, the war had been over for 4 days. The final battle of the American Civil War was an unqualified Confederate victory. It was, by any measure, a pointless and meaningless battle.
  3. In light of the recent popping up of several Naval Action Newspapers for PvP Europe, I decided to make a special pre-wipe issue of The St. Croix Royal Gazette, which I've been working on since the wipe announcement:
  4. Naval Action - Archives of War

    W.I.P. history on Naval Action will be coming when EA hits. Preparing at the moment, maybe ill get some pre-EA pilot posts but nothing worth looking at. Read this topic for additional info http://forum.game-labs.net/index.php?/topic/7975-is-there-a-way-to-curb-these-english-devils/ .
  5. Over the past few months, my desk has become littered with books on piracy. Margarette Lincoln's British Pirates and Society, 1680 - 1730 I found to be the most useful, and most recent - referring back to many of the earlier books that I had either already bought or were recommended to me. After reading multiple articles, chapters, and whole books, I felt it was appropriate to write a paper on the subject matter between semesters. I tend to prefer PDFs for sharing of my work for proper footnotes and formatting, so please forgive me for having to go via Google Drive. That said, I present: Stateless Men: An Examination of Historical Piracy
  6. Naval Art

    I draw a bit in my free time. I've been fascinated by the sea and ships for as long as I can remember, and ships are one of the few things that I can draw reasonably well, so I thought I might post a pic or two of some of the things I've drawn on here.
  7. Historical expertise needed

    Greetings my friends. I'll keep this short. I am in the process of writing a novel set during the Hundred Years' War that was fought between England and France. The period of the war I am concentrating on is the period between 1337 and 1375. During that time there were many naval engagements. The battle of Sluys involved Hundreds of ships and the strategies used by both side are similar to those used at the battle of the Nile. Also the battle Les Espagols sur mer, aka The Battle of Winchelsea, which involved approximately 40-50 ships on each side showed that control of the sea has been an important war objective long before the 'age of sail'. I understand that the age of sail referred to on this forum is a time of sailing ships hundreds of years after the time frame of my novel, but I know that there are many clever people on the forum that have a vast knowledge of history. I need information on the ships used at the time, the cogs and hulks as they were known. Also the Castilian and Genoan galleys. I know abit but not enough for a good detailed novel. Could anyone tell me of crew numbers, speed, seaworthiness and perhaps the interiors too. I know 'cabins' weren't really a thing at the time, not how we know them to be. Of course I've looked up the information myself but I find a lot of what I read tends to be contradictory and quite vague. Thank you all.
  8. Captain Fitzgerald

    I put together this edit from the movie "Amistad".
  9. Baba Yetu

    Civilization and culture is what we as humans make of it. Culture is as simple as playing a guitar or cooking a turkey on special gatherings. Or it could be as large as building megaliths like the pyramids of Giza. Unfortunately, with many positive parts of culture, there are also negative parts. It's what we as individuals make of it that counts though, in my opinion.
  10. In Game Encyclopedia? Idea?

    Hello all, Been away for a while as I started at uni in September so have been rather occupied recently, and secondly I have kind of been waiting for the game to hit the soft release on steam. As im hoping that's when there wont be anymore server wipes?!?! I love the game and have 60+ hours on steam but have yet to get the Beautiful Bellona sadly in open world or before! (Apologies if I have spelt that wrong) and cant spare the time to keep grinding to it... Anyway enough moaning about a wonderful game and back on point, So I was thinking, is the game going to have some form of in game encyclopedia? It would be wonderful to have access to something along these lines in game, with some details of the ships along with their background and history, stats, crew and armament ect and an interactive model you could move around and simply enjoy looking at(That would be awesome!). You could also have information on nations, ranks, ports, commodities, resources used in game ect ect. Not everyone is going to want to get the biggest 1st rates (not I for one) but I would love to have a closer look at them and enjoy the work you guys have put into modelling and texturing these beautiful creations, im actually studying Game Tech so have started some modelling myself (3ds Max), so now I have 'some' understanding of what's involved im really starting to appreciate the beauty in games a lot more! keep up the excellent work guys, the game is superb as is and im sure its only going to continue to get better and better! Samuel
  11. Naval History Articles

    Dear All, Having become recently obsessed with naval history and also having access to an academic library and databases I have been reading journal articles about napoleonic wars with a special focus on the naval historical aspect. I have assembled some of the articles in a dropbox folder here. Please read and enjoy them. I would love to discuss any of them that you have particularly enjoy. Just to reiterate, I am not a historian just a geek with too much time on his hands.
  12. Arctic Exploration

    One of the fields of exploration that fits within the time frame of the game is the attempts by Franklin, Ross, and Perry to discover a northwest passage, in other words polar exploration. The more famous expeditions used British Vesuvius and Fury Bomb class ships that were constructed throughout the early 1800s, some saw combat in the war of 1812, and in conflicts with North Africa. The ships were refitted (generally before 1830) after combat and used to great effect to explore the frozen north due to their heavier construction (HMS Hecla also saw service as a survey ship). Players could start out with the military variants (balance issues aside since they carried 13 and 10 inch mortars) and then have the option to refit for exploration. This type of exploration could be a niche field that provides an alternate high risk/high reward style of play and adds diversity to the game. Players could become trapped and run a loss or make it back to port with valuable scientific data. There could also be the ability to choose to rescue each other in the relatively isolated environment or abandon each other in the name of profit. People could also try to find npc explorers who got lost and never made it back through finding the expedition party or ships stuck in the ice. Quick list of some of the positives and negatives: Pros: Provides something to do at the higher latitudes away from the meridian, High risk/high reward that's not illegal, Adds diversity and specialization into the game. Cons: Something the devs have to work on (research, balancing, map, ship models, etc.), Lack of widespread appeal. Most of the naval games focus on the Mediterranean and Caribbean, but if Naval Action is going to be open world then the Polar regions could be incorporated as an interesting piece of history and help make the game stand out even more.
  13. I would really find it interesting to have region-specific historical 'niche' trades and careers, that go deeper than just the role of 'Merchant' or 'Privateer', although those would still be your overall career. Let me explain: In the West Indies there was a large variety of region specific trades and careers. Many players are already suggesting meta-games like 'oyster fishing' and such - why not have ones based in historical reality? I.e. Rather than generic 'fishing' (although we would have it), we could have region specific trade of turtle-striking (a mainstay staple food for all peoples of the West Indies). I think this would add varied national and regional flavour as well as giving in-depth options for game-play, deeper than the basic 'Merchant' or 'privateer' roles. As we expand into Europe and other regions, more trades and careers unique to that region could be implemented there. This also gives added bonuses and incentives as well as drawbacks for playing in different regions of the globe, creating dynamic and varied game-play in keeping with the 'immersive historical experience'. Examples of regional trades and careers specific to the West Indies include: the logwood cutting trade with Honduras, very popular (with the British at least) - a highly lucrative yet potentially very dangerous mission with the constant risk of encountering the Spanish 'Guardas Costas' patrolling the waters (see below). The very lucrative yet equally dangerous smuggling that France, Britain, Holland and Denmark engaged in with Spain, trading European manufactured goods for Spanish gold and silver, known in English as the Sloop Trade (as it was most often carried out in light & nimble local sloops). Likewise for the more warlike manner, Spanish privateers could be the Guardas Costas - hired mercenaries, sometimes policing shores and protecting shipping, and at others, engaging in smuggling and semi-piratical marauding in their own right. This would give great regional and national variation as well as depth to careers beyond just the roll of ‘privateer’ or ‘merchant’. This may not be implemented in any immediate future, but down the road, once we've got all the important features smoothed out and firmly in place, I think it would be something really great to have.
  14. A Brief History Guide of Pirate Flags

    Piracy has long been a part of the sailing culture. As long as there has been maritime trade, there has been Piracy (Not even Caesar was immune!) The Discovery Age, and the years of sea trade and travel following helped promote piracy to incredible levels during the 17th and 18th century, so much so that when speaking of the Spanish main, this era is also referred to as "the Golden Age of Piracy". It is no secret that pirates will be included in Naval Action, at least as NPC enemies. Unlike navies, which flew the flags of their country as their main jack, Pirate flags were mostly unique. The Pirate flag was used not only to identify the ship and crew as Pirates, but also to intimidate and send a message. Many Pirate Captains decided to use their own designs for their own needs and to send their own unique message. Here I will present a brief description of what different symbols and flags used by Pirates meant (so you may better prepare yourself when you see one of ours heading your way ) The Jolly Roger: Although a specific captain's flag, the term "Jolly Roger" quickly became a blanket term for any and all pirate jacks. pirate captains just starting off or less notable may have simple black or red flags with no design; this still would have been considered a Jolly Roger and would still identify them as pirates. A few captains' designs compete for being considered the actual Jolly Roger, however it the general consensus that it was either Edward England's or 'Calico' Jack Rackham's design that was considered the Jolly Roger (NOTE: Not the first pirate flag). The main purpose of any Jolly Roger would be to first intimidate the opposing crew in the hopes that either they would surrender without a fight, or would be fear stricken and thus be less effective in combat. Black and Red fields: Pirates of the Golden Age followed a practice where the color of a flag's field sent a message in and of itself. A black field (the most common) symbolized that quarter would be given to the enemy crew if they surrendered without a fight, or should they fight, quarter would still be given to any survivors. The reason for this is that often pirate captains were looking for A: New crew, and the best way to acquire new, seasoned sailors as pirates was to coerce them to leave behind "legitimate" sailing for piracy, B: prisoners to ransom or sell back at a pirate port, or C: Political personal reasons (There are accounts of varying pirate captains acting differently to certain nationalities; an English pirate captain would give quarter and be lenient to English victims while being ruthless and giving no quarter for French victims). A red field symbolized that no quarter was to be given. No surrender would be accepted and no survivors would be taken aboard. Here is an example of when a pirate was known for flying both versions of the flag, Henry Avery: Symbols and their message: As stated before, many pirate captains used their own unique designs for their flags. However, there were a number of common details used in many pirate flags that also carried a message. Skull and Bones- The most common and well known of pirate flag facets, the depiction of any combination of skulls and/or bones was an easily identifiable symbol for death. Death- The depiction of Death, or the Grim Reaper (or in some cases, the Devil), on pirate flags was a common practice. Often depicted as either a skeleton, demon, or ghoul, Death would be used to symbolize that "Death is upon you" or Death has come". Death would also often be depicted with a spear in hand in some cases. The Hourglass- Another common practice for pirate flags was the image of a simple hourglass, such as the one depicted under the skull in Emanuel Wynn's flag. The hourglass could be depicted by itself or in the hands of Death, symbolizing that "Your time has come" or "Time is running out (for you)". The hourglass could also be depicted with wings, symbolizing that "Your time is flying away": Blades and Arms- depictions of swords and daggers can be found on many pirate jacks, along with a raised arm (by itself or part of a body ) symbolizing that the crew was ready and willing to fight. Heart- Not exactly the first thing to come to mind when thinking of pirates, the orientation of a heart on a pirate jack can be very important. If a sword or spear was pointed at or piercing a heart , it meant that no quarter was to be given, even if it was depicted on a black field. This is just a quick background of famous pirate flags and designs. The information here is true to the best of my knowledge, using a number of sources and prior knowledge, some of which are linked throughout the post (I used Wikipedia mostly for images.) I hope you all enjoy this quick into the "Hidden messages" of pirate flags. Cheers! P.S. - i felt this was more history than off-topic discussion, but if this needs to be moved to the Tavern, please do so. I wasn't 100% sure where to put it. Cheers again.
  15. Historical Range (Time Period)

    What is the the historical time frame or range for this game? Will the Developers include the early period of the Age of Sail and Cannon? The 1500s? The 1600s? The 1700s? Is the Napoleonic Age the end time or the only time? I'd like some clarification here. This is a period of 300+ years and a lot of developments occurred during this time. Note: I observe that almost all illustrations and references appear to be 'Napoleonic', however, where exactly, timewise, will this game begin?
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