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Found 49 results

  1. Beautiful French medium sized ship could be a great match for a newly added USS Niagara! 'Amazon' 1745 Description unavailable. Plans
  2. Myrmidon 1781 Dimensions: Length of Gundeck 113' 9 ½" Length of Keel 94' 2" Breadth 31' 0" Depth in Hold 10' 2" Burthen 481 15⁄94 Armarment: Upper Gun Deck 20 6-pounder Quarterdeck 2 3-pounder (to be replaced by two 12-pounder carronades later on) Hull coppered in August 1781. Named for the warlike race who followed Achilles in the Trojan War, the first H.M.S. Myrmidon to serve in the Royal Navy was a sixth rate of 481 tons built at Deptford and laid down in November 1779. Launched on 9th June 1781, she measured 114 feet in length with a 31 foot beam and was based on the lines of H.M.S. Amazon, a French frégate légère (La Panthère) captured in 1745 and assimilated into the fleet on account of her particularly useful design. Mounting 22 guns - 20-6pdrs. on her upper deck and 2-3pdrs. on her quarterdeck - and carrying a crew of 160, she was not completed until the American War of Independence was drawing close and thus saw only limited service. Despite the Navy's needs in the French Wars, she was hulked for harbour service in 1798 and broken up in April 1811. Six other (slighly smaller and more cost-effective) ships based on her lines were built, Echo (1782), Rattler (1783), Calypso (1783), Brisk (1784), Nautilus (1784), Scorpion (1785). All these ships share a rather uncommon feature, the french-style stern which looks like a direct copy of the stern of the Panthère (or the Renommée, her 'bigger sister'). I orderd her surprisingly complete plans from the NMM, let´s see when they´ll arrive
  3. La Sardoine 1757 French 4-pdr Corvette 12-18 guns Built by J.-L. Coulomb in Nantes. Captured in 1761 by the British 5th-Rate brig-sloop HMS Alarm (32 guns + 12 swivel-guns, 1758) and renamed HMS Sardoine. La Sardoine as taken off, prior to fitting as a 14-gun ship sloop http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/83948.html Plan showing the quarterdeck, forecastle, upper deck, and after platforms and magazine for La Sardoine Second plan of La Sardoine as taken off, prior to fitting as a 14-gun ship sloop. Note that there are no waterlines represented on this one. Historical armament : As she's been pierced by 18 portholes since French building, she could carry up to 18 x 4-pdr + swivel guns. and nothing excludes such an armament during war time. Known armament from sources : French service : Built with 12 x 4-pdr (Boudriot, Historique de la Corvette) 14 x 4-pdr + 6 Swivel guns (31 pds) (threedecks.org) British service : 14 x 4-pdr (Ian McLaughlhan, Sloop of War 1650-1763) 14 × 4-pdr + 10 ½-pdr Swivel guns (30, 5 pds) (threedecks.org) Suggestion for in-game armament : 12-18 x 4-pdr (giving a broadside weight = 24-36 pds), filling the 'gap' between in-game Lynx (8 x 6-pdr = 24 pds) and the Pickle / Privateer / Cutter (12 x 6-pdr = 36 pds). Nota : a 'sardoine' (sard or sardius in English) is a 'yellow or brownish-red semi-precious stone consisting of a variety of chalcedony'. Dimensions Dimensions of 4-pdr Corvettes (16 guns) made by Coulomb in the same year (see below) (pieds du Roi) : Length between perpendiculars : 100' Breadth overall to outside of frame : 25' Depth in hold from top of the keel to the line of the deck at the middle line : 12, 6' Dimensions of La Sardoine (before British refit) from threedecks.org (pieds du Roi) : Length of gundeck : 91'0" Breadth : 23'6" Depth in hold : 9'6" Displacement : c. 300 ton Burthen : 165 ton Dimensions of HMS Sardoine (after refit) from threedecks.org (imperial feet) : Length of gundeck : 94' 4 ½ " Length of keel : 78' 9 ¼ " Breadth : 24' 8 ½ " Depth in hold : 10' 1 ½ " Burthen : 255 74/94 tons BM Sources : J. Boudriot, Historique de la Corvette, p. 30 Ian McLauglhan, Sloop of War 1650-1763 http://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=15602 http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/83948.html Extract of Ian McLauglhan's Sloop of War 1650-1763 about La Sardoine : "[..] was built at Nantes to the design of Jacques-Luc Coulomb. She had four sisters;in fact the French Navy commisioned nine corvettes designed by Coulomb, most listed as 100ft lenght on deck. [...] If the corvettes produced under the supervision of Blaise Ollivier appear extreme in hull design, they are nothing compared to Sardoine, whose sections exhibit an exaggerated version of the earlier designs. Sardoine was builit thirteen years later after La Palme and in addition to her highly developed hull, she was about 10ft longer and was pierced for nine guns a side, though armed with only twelve 4pdrs. She was commissioned into the Royal Navy at Portsmouth in 1761 and given an extra pair of 4pdrs. The waterlines in the half-breadth plan provide a clear view of the remarkably fine ends of this vessel, particulary that of the run. Her sheer plan shows the French preference for only a light degree of rake at bow and stern, but there is exaggeration in that her sternpost is actually raked forwards, Like the earlier corvettes, she has a marked degree of tumblehome which may help stability by bringing the weight of the gguns closer to the centreline but at the same time it would have made their handling difficult, possibly reducing their rate of fire; it was also less effective at dampening rolling than more 'wall-sided' designs. [...] She is shown with a raised quarterdeck and forecastle on the plan, which is dated April 1761 (ie before the prize was formally purchased), so these are probably as captured; the height underneath them is only 5ft aft and 4ft 6in forward." Contemporary 4-pdr Corvettes built by J.- L. Coulomb (from Boudriot) : Sister ships of La Sardoine according to threedecks.org : https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_class&id=535 L’Ecureuil (Nantes, 1756) La Jacinthe (Brest, 1756) La Renoncule (Nantes, 1757) L’Arc-en-ciel (?) (Brest, 1758) Voyages of La Sardoine La Sardoine sailed for la Martinique. Later, captured by the British in the Bay of Biscay. As HMS Sardoine, she then sailed for the West Indies and New York. Thx to @Sella22 and @Surcouf for their help !!!!
  4. L'Amarante French 4-pdr Corvette 1747 - 1760 12 guns Dimensions : Length between perpendiculars : 84' Breadth overall to outside of frame : 22' Depth in hold from top of the keel to the line of the deck at the middle line : 10' Armament : 12 x 4-pdr Built in Brest by Joseph-Louis Ollivier. Monograph and plans : http://gerard.delacroix.pagesperso-orange.fr/Ama/plaquette.htm Sister ships : La Palme, 1744 and L'Anémone, 1747. http://www.laroyale-modelisme.net/t12151-expo-et-conferences-au-pays-de-saint-malo Source : J. Boudriot, La Créole, p. 19
  5. La Perle (translation : The Pearl) French 4-pdr Corvette A very small (three-masted) ship sloop with a length = 76' (pieds du Roi) 1744 12 guns Drawings by C.-P. Caffiéri, SHM D1 68 Archives of the Port at Toulon (France), 1 L 442.I2. n° 1 Dimensions (pieds du Roi) : Length between perpendiculars : 76' Breadth overall to outside of frame : 20.8' Depth in hold from top of the keel to the line of the deck at the middle line : 9' Armament : historical : 12 x 3-pdr, then 12 x 4-pdr in-game suggestion : 12 x 4-pdr (broadside weight = 24 pdr) Built in Brest by J. Chapelle, under the orders of Blaise Ollivier. Sources : J. Boudriot, Historique de la Corvette, p. 19-21. https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=15570
  6. La Palme (translation : 'The palm Leaf' or 'The Laurels') French 4-pdr Corvette 12 guns 1744 Armament (historical and in-game suggestion) : 12 x 4-pdr Broadside weight = 24 pds (= Lynx) Alternatives dimensions (pieds du Roi) : Sources : Boudriot p. 19 + plan above Length between perpendiculars : 85' 5" Breadth overall to outside of frame : 22' 8" Depth in hold from top of the keel to the line of the deck at the middle line : 10' 6" Sources : Boudriot p. 16, SH 321 or 324 Length between perpendiculars : 85' Breadth overall to outside of frame : 22' 6" Depth in hold from top of the keel to the line of the deck at the middle line : 10' 4" Source : threedecks.org Length of Gundeck : 84' 0" Length of Keel : 76'0" Breadth : 22'0" Depth in hold : 9' 0" Burthen : 120 ton Built at Brest (France) by Joseph-Louis Ollivier at the age of... 15. Building features : hull with quite a flat bottom and substantial tumblehome, no forecastle, upper part of the hull is low above the waterline, displacement : 265 tx, her general design is modern for its time. Drawing of the naval sculpture by Caffieri : French Archives, D1 68, f°2, cl. 7289 Sources : Boudriot, Historique de la corvette, La Créole, 1993, p. 16-19. Plans (French Archives) : SH 324, p. 189 ; 2G2 n° 204 ('La Palme, 4-pdr Corvette carrying 10 guns, c. 1744, unsigned') https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=15577 Sister ships : L'Anémone and L'Amarante, 1747 Thx to @Sella22 !
  7. La Naïade (The Naiad) French 9-pdr corvette 1779 20 guns Dimensions (pied du Roi) : 119 x 30,6 x 15,6 Armament : 20 x 9-pdr Built by J.-M.-B. Coulomb (at Toulon), captured by the British in 1783 and converted into a 26-gun 6th-Rate, HMS Naiad(e). Seven sister ships (built beween 1779-1781 with the best ship names ever ;-) : La Coquette, La Blonde, La Brune, La Sémillante, La Badine, La Belette, La Poulette Plan made by the British in 1783, before main transformations, kept by the Greenwich NMMuseum Plan analysis : Notice 10 portholes for 10 guns + a front port, empty, to be filled by the nearest gun during chasing, The 3 portholes on the quarterdeck don't belong to the French version of the ship but are part of the British conversion proposal, Hull with a flat bottom and substantial tumblehome as earlier in the 18th century (see La Renommée) Possible figurehead : a pair of Marmaids Sculpture made by the Arsenal de Toulon (where the Corvette was built) in 1779 (same date) from Antoine Gibert's drawings for the 'frigate' (?) La Naïade (186 x 55 x 68 cm) Paris, musée national de la Marine, Inv. 9 OA 17 [39 OA 16] Sources : Boudriot, Historique de la corvette, La Créole 1827, p. 26-27, 30 Boudriot, Neptunia n° 137, 1980 https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=16595 Drawing of the hull : http://i68.servimg.com/u/f68/16/20/79/11/0410.jpg Article about Corvettes by Surcouf : http://forum.game-labs.net/topic/7645-les-corvettes/?tab=comments#comment-144903
  8. There are several things I must apologize for in advance: 1. The title is slightly misleading. The scans I will be posting are taken from the book "History of the American Sailing Navy" by Howard Chapelle. The scans are of vessels proposed and/or built for both the Continental Navy and the American Navy up to the year 1820. There are further sketches, sail plans, draughts, etc beyond that cut-off, should any request them, however, for the sake of avoiding arguments, I have not included them. 2. I was heartily disappointed to discover that the larger plans are on facing pages within the book, thus forcing me to remove the cover of the book and do the best I can to provide the most accurate scans possible; being an amateur with book binding, no easy feat. All of the plans on facing pages are tucked into the book spine itself and as such, the plans are slightly off in the middle and may require some guesswork. 3. Lastly, I realize some of the plans posted are more than likely already on the forums. I skipped some plans because I knew for a fact they were already on the forums, but I may have missed a few during the scan & upload process. Don't flame this poor lubber too hard. The plans I will be uploading range from small vessels such as schooners, galleys, brigs and sloops, up to frigates ranging from 28 to 44 guns, and finally plans for the American ships of the line up to, but not including the USS Pennsylvania, as the date on the plans for that particular ship are after 1820. Again, any particular requests for plans can be mailed to me via the forum messaging system. Fishnuts
  9. this was the Bounty replica sunk during Hurricane Sandy in October 2012. HMS Bounty, also known as HM Armed Vessel Bounty, was a small merchant vessel purchased by the Royal Navy for a botanical mission. The ship, under the command of William Bligh, was sent to the Pacific Ocean to acquire breadfruit plants and transport them to British possessions in the West Indies. That mission was never completed, due to a mutiny led by the acting Master, Fletcher Christian. This was the famous Mutiny on the Bounty. Bounty was originally known as collier Bethia, built in 1784 at the Blaydes shipyard in Kingston upon Hull, East Yorkshire, England. The vessel was purchased by the Royal Navy for £1,950 on 23 May 1787, refit, and renamed Bounty. The ship was relatively small at 215 tons, but had three masts and was full-rigged. After conversion for the breadfruit expedition, she was equipped with four 4-pounder (1.8 kg) cannons and ten swivel guns. Class and type: Armed Vessel Tons burthen: 220 26⁄94 Length: 90 ft 10 in (27.69 m) Beam: 24 ft 4 in (7.42 m) Depth of hold: 11 ft 4 in (3.45 m) Propulsion: Sails Sail plan: Full rigged ship Complement: 44 officers and men Armament: 4 × 4-pounder guns 10 × swivel guns Plans (orignal & Modell-Plans) hyperlinks to Original sources on the net you can see below Other Pictures HMS Bounty, also known as HM Armed Vessel Bounty, was a merchant vessel purchased by the Royal Navy for a botanical mission. The ship, under the command of William Bligh, was sent to the Pacific Ocean to acquire breadfruit plants and transport them to British possessions in the West Indies. That mission was never completed, due to a mutiny led by the acting Master, Fletcher Christian. This was the famous Mutiny on the Bounty. A new HMS Bounty was constructed in Nova Scotia for the 1962 film Mutiny on the Bounty. Until 2012, she was owned by not-for-profit organizations whose primary aim was to sail her and other square rigged sailing ships, and she sailed the world to appear at harbors. On October 29, 2012, sixteen Bounty crew-members abandoned ship off the coast of North Carolina in Hurricane Sandy. The ship sank at 12:45 UTC Monday October 29, 2012, and two crew members, including Captain Robin Walbridge were missing. The Captain was not found and presumed dead. The body of other missing crew members was recovered later. Her name was Claudene Christian and she was the great-great-great-great-great granddaughter of Fletcher Christian, the leader fo the mutiny on the original HMS Bounty. A second HMS Bounty replica, named HMAV Bounty, was built in New Zealand in 1979 and used in the 1984 film The Bounty. For many years she served the tourist excursion market from Darling Harbor, Sydney, Australia, before being sold to HKR International Limited in October 2007. She became a tourist attraction in Discovery Bay, on Lantau Island in Hong Kong. On 25 October 2012, the replica HMS Bounty left New London, Connecticut, heading for St. Petersburg, Florida, initially going on an easterly course to avoid Hurricane Sandy. On 29 October 2012 at 03:54 EDT, the ship's owner called the United States Coast Guard for help during the hurricane after she lost contact with the ship's master. There were sixteen people aboard. Fourteen people had been rescued from liferafts by two rescue helicopters. The storm had washed the captain and two crew overboard—one of the latter had made it to a liferaft, but the other two were missing. They wore orange survival suits complete with strobe lights, thereby giving rescuers some hope of finding them alive. Claudene Christian, one of the two missing crew members and who claimed to be a descendant of HMS Bounty mutineer Fletcher Christian, was found dead by the Coast Guard. She was unresponsive, and rushed to a hospital where she was pronounced dead. The other missing crew member was long-time captain Robin Walbridge. Raised in Montpelier, Vermont, Walbridge later moved to St. Petersburg, Florida. He was a field mechanic on houseboats who worked his way up to obtaining a 1600 ton license in 1995, when he began working as a Bounty crew member. Search efforts for Walbridge continued over an area of 12,000 square nautical miles until they were suspended on 1 November 2012. Sources: http://www.stephens-kenau.com/hms_surprise-product-view-12.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Bounty http://www.eyeonannapolis.net/2012/06/15/tour-the-hms-bounty/ https://fatboxsoftware.wordpress.com/2012/02/15/264/ http://modelshipmaster.com/products/tall_ships/hms_bounty.html http://www.radekshipmodels.cz/cz/plany-lodi/h_m_s_-bounty-plan http://avhs2.ednet.ns.ca/staff/wile/Schematics.html http://www.modellboard.net/index.php?topic=32158.0 http://www.asso5a.org/manuale_navimodellismo_hms_bounty.html http://www.fiddlersgreenmodelships.com/id7.html PS: I know that this ship was already mentioned in a posting on NA-Forum, but i did not found it in shipyard so i created this topic. And so on I didn't find all original construction plans, but a lot of modellplans 1:60 - 1:70 so it would be nice if you find better plans, that you post it here.
  10. Replik der Endeavour, 1994 HMS Endeavour, also known as HM Bark Endeavour, was a British Royal Navy research vessel that Lieutenant James Cook commanded on his first voyage of discovery, to Australia and New Zealand, from 1769 to 1771. She was launched in 1764 as the collier Earl of Pembroke, and the Navy purchased her in 1768 for a scientific mission to the Pacific Ocean and to explore the seas for the surmised Terra Australis Incognita or "unknown southern land". The Navy renamed and commissioned her as His Majesty's Bark the Endeavour. She departed Plymouth in August 1768, rounded Cape Horn, and reached Tahiti in time to observe the 1769 transit of Venus across the Sun. She then set sail into the largely uncharted ocean to the south, stopping at the Pacific islands of Huahine, Borabora, and Raiatea to allow Cook to claim them for Great Britain. In September 1769, she anchored off New Zealand, the first European vessel to reach the islands since Abel Tasman's Heemskerck 127 years earlier. In April 1770, Endeavour became the first ship to reach the east coast of Australia, when Cook went ashore at what is now known as Botany Bay. Endeavour then sailed north along the Australian coast. She narrowly avoided disaster after running aground on the Great Barrier Reef, and Cook had to throw her guns overboard to lighten her. He then beached her on the mainland for seven weeks to permit rudimentary repairs to her hull. On 10 October 1770, she limped into port in Batavia (now named Jakarta) in the Dutch East Indies for more substantial repairs, her crew sworn to secrecy about the lands they had visited. She resumed her westward journey on 26 December, rounded the Cape of Good Hope on 13 March 1771, and reached the English port of Dover on 12 July, having been at sea for nearly three years. Largely forgotten after her epic voyage, Endeavour spent the next three years shipping Navy stores to the Falkland Islands. Renamed and sold into private hands in 1775, she briefly returned to naval service as a troop transport during the American War of Independence and was scuttled in a blockade of Narragansett Bay, Rhode Island, in 1778. Her wreck has not been precisely located, but relics, including six of her cannon and an anchor, are displayed at maritime museums worldwide. A replica of Endeavour was launched in 1994 and is berthed alongside the Australian National Maritime Museum in Sydney Harbour. The space shuttle Endeavour is named for the original ship. Endeavour also features on the New Zealand 50-cent coin. Class and type: Bark Tons burthen: 368 71⁄94 (bm) Length: 106 ft (32 m) Beam: 29 ft 3 in (8.92 m) Sail plan: Full rigged ship 3,321 square yards (2,777 m2) of sail Speed: 7 to 8 knots (13 to 15 km/h) maximum Boats and landing craft carried: yawl, pinnace, longboat, two skiffs Complement: 94, comprising: 71 ship's company 12 marines 11 civilians Armament: 10 4-pdrs, 12 swivel guns Plans Endeavour (1768) Other Pictures sources: Royal Museum Greenwich http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Endeavour http://www.long-tom.de/endeavour/index.html https://jamescookship.wordpress.com/ http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/6769-hmb-endeavour-1768-3d-model/ http://www.modelships.de/Endeavour_II/Endeavour_II_eng.htm
  11. French Corvettes had three masts, most carried about 16 to 24 guns, sometimes more (up to 32). The British Navy did not adopt the term until the 1830s, to describe a small sixth-rate vessel somewhat larger than a sloop, sometimes with only 2 masts. La Créole 1827, 24 guns Plan and monograph : http://ancre.fr/en/monographies-en/61-monographie-de-la-creole-corvette-1823.html?search_query=corvette&results=6 Source : https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_corvette_Créole_(1829)
  12. Here is a set of nice 20-24 gun ships (Corvettes and Light Frigates) from various nations. The idea is to choose one (max two) ship(s) per nation ; some of the most typical, best, most known or well-documented ones. Feel free to add suggestions for the missing nations. What would be your favorite 20-24 gun ship ? 1) Spanish Descubierta 1789, 16-26 gun Corvette The Descubierta and Atrevida were twin corvettes of the Spanish Navy, custom-designed as identical special exploration and scientific research vessels. Both ships were built at the same time for the Malaspina Expedition, a five-year maritime scientific exploration. The two vessels sailed from Spain to the Pacific Ocean, conducting a thorough examination of the internal politics of the American Spanish Empire and the Philippines. The military version of the Descubierta carried 26 guns. Pictures / 3-Decks / Wiki 2) Dano-Norwegian Christiansborg 1758, 24-gun frigate The Christiansborg was designed by Michael Krabbe, launched in 1758 as a 12-pounder frigate, broken up in 1786. Krabbe submitted this plan after returning from the obligatory European study trip (1752 - 1756, visiting British, French, Italian and Dutch shipyards) and a certain French influence is clearly visible. Pictures/ 3-Decks 3) Russian Vostok (Восто́к, The East) 24-gun Sloop-of-war, 1818 http://forum.game-labs.net/index.php?/topic/7768-exploration-and-survey-ships/&do=findComment&comment=140868 With the 20-gun sloop-of-war Mirny (1819), she took part of the second Russian circumnavigation of the globe (1819-1821), led by Fabian Gottlieb von Bellingshausen, which discovered the land of Antartica in 1820. 4) French La Diligente Corvette, 20 guns, 1801 http://forum.game-labs.net/index.php?/topic/7682-french-corvettes-collection-6th-rates-with-plans/&do=findComment&comment=153304 She had a very good reputation in France as she was considered there as "the fastest ship of her time", "the best model to follow" (J. Tupinier) and her plan were to be reused between 1824-1826 to built 8 corvettes-aviso. Variant : La Favorite (1829) 24-gun Corvette http://forum.game-labs.net/index.php?/topic/7682-french-corvettes-collection-6th-rates-with-plans/&do=findComment&comment=140642 She was part of an expedition that lasted from 1829 to 1932 during which she passed the Cape of Good Hope, stopped at Pondicherry and Madras, and then explored the coast of Cochinchina and Tonkin, stopped in the Philippines, Australia, Tasmania and New Zealand. The expedition was considered a great success, many hydrological observations were completed and natural history collections assembled. 5) British HMS Amazon 22-gun ship, 1745 Sistership : HMS Myrmidon (1781) http://forum.game-labs.net/index.php?/topic/6183-myrmidon-1781-british-22-gun-ship-with-plans/ La Panthère (1744), a French 20-gun Corvette, was captured in 1745, refitted to carry 22 guns, renamed HMS Amazon and assimilated into the Royal Navy on account of her particularly useful design. HMS Myrmidon (1781, 22 guns) is her British version from which six other ships were to be built. British HMS Sphinx 20 x 9-pdr, 1775 (suggested by Haratik : Thx !!!) more plans : http://zope.mein-media.de/meinmedia/frigate/plans/index.html HMS Sphinx (1775-1811) has been captured by the French, then recaptured by the British : https://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=6842 6) Dutch Venus Corvette, 20 guns, 1806 (suggested by SteelSandwich : Thx !!!) http://forum.game-labs.net/index.php?/topic/19074-venus-1806/ The Venus had an interesting career, especially given her role during the Siege of Palembang (1821). 7) Venetian unnamed Corvette 22-gun corvette, XVIII-th century http://forum.game-labs.net/index.php?/topic/7685-venetianitalian-ship-collection-with-plans/ 8) American USS Wasp 18-gun corvette, 1807 (16 x 32-pdr + 2 x 12-pdr carronades) http://forum.game-labs.net/index.php?/topic/7707-american-ship-collection-with-plans/#comment-145983 In 1812 she captured HMS Frolic, but was immediately herself captured. The British took her into service first as HMS Loup Cervier and then as HMS Peacock. She was lost, presumed foundered with all hands, in mid-1814.
  13. Venus - 1806

    The Venus & Lynx were the first iteration of Pieter Glavimans's new corvet design. Similar to the Wreker-class, several would be build in Amsterdam and some in Rotterdam. The venus would be constructed in Amsterdam by Pieter Schuijt Jr , overseen by Glavimans himself the Lynx would be constructed in Rotterdam. Both ships would lead completely different career paths. The measurement of the ships (amsterdamse voet): 120 ft x 33 9/11 ft x 16 8/11 ft In meters: 34,0 x 9,6 x 4,8 Crew: 120 Armament: 20x 12 pd From 1818 was designated to carry: 20x 30pd carronade The plan of the Lynx & Venus: Wooden reference models made: The Lynx only lasted a few years, being scrapped from the records in 1813. The Venus however had a rather interesting career. Most notable of which was the part she played during the Siege of Palembang: As seen in the center, marked with an F, you can see the positioning of the Venus. During the assault, she took the brunt of the fire, whilst the other ships in the fleet cleared the shores for landing. A passage of what happened that day: '' De volgende aanval vond de 24ste plaats; voor het aanbreken van de dag namen de oorlogsschepen hun posities in en beantwoordden het vijandelijke vuur vanaf vijf uur. Om kwart over zes verminderde dit vijandelijke vuur; kolonel Bisschof, die met zijn troepen in landingsboten door de palen heendrong, ondernam een aanval aan de linkerkant van het eiland. De batterij werd overmeesterd en de kapiteins Elout en Dibbets en luitenant Lejeune wisten de Nederlandse vlag op de vijandelijke versterkingen te plaatsen. Een poging om de grote batterij van voren aan te vallen werd als onverstandig geoordeeld en de troepen verenigden zich aan de kant van het eiland om daar de rivier over te steken en de batterijen op de rechteroever aan te vallen. Intussen hadden de Venus en de Ajax de waterbatterijen tot zwijgen gebracht. '' Roughly translated: '' The next attack took place on the 24th; before the break of dawn the warships took their positions and started to return the enemy fire. Around quarter past six enemy canon fire started to reduce, which was the signal for colonel Bisschof to make his move. With his troops in landings rafts he penetrated the poles and launched an attack on the left side of the Island. The battery was taken and the captains Elout and Dibbets and Lieutenant Lejeune managed to joist the Dutch flag. An attempt to frontally attack the big battery was deemed unwise and the troops assembled on the east side of the island, preparing to attack the right shore battery. In the meantime the Venus and Ajax managed to silence the shore battery more inland.'' The ship as well as her captain and crew was honored for their steadfast performance. Sadly the damage she suffered was substantial. Her after action report shows a total of 7 dead and 17 wounded. In 1821, after the major repairs, the Venus would be transferred to the colonial navy (Dutch East Indies) where she would serve until 1823 when she was sold to the public. In October, still unmoved at the shipyard, she was demolished. Painting: Based on the lines of the 1806 corvets, an improved design was put to use in 1818. To replace the lost 1806 Lynx. Spoiler for those who are interested:
  14. Models Contemporary Other http://b.rimlinger.free.fr/creole17.htm http://www.modelships.de/La-Creole/Photos-Corvette-La-Creole.htm Paintings The Prince de Joinville on the poop deck of La Créole (the ship to the left is La Créole) Dimensions length 38,22 m (125' 5') breadth 9,70 m (31' 10'') depth in hold 5,15 m (16' 10'') draught aft 4,52 m (14' 10'') height of battery 1,80 m (5'11'') length-to-breadth ratio 3,94 Armament 20 30-pound carronades 4 18-pounders Crew 166 Ships in class La Blonde/Jeanne Hachette 1832 Sailing characteristics (for her sister-ship La Blonde) 9 1/2 - 10 knots close-hauled, 12,5 knots large, 10 knots wind on the beam. Very maneuverable, carried her sail very well and liked medium to heavy conditions, in light winds her sailing qualities were described as 'ordinary'. Service History Laid down 1827, launched 1829. Took part in the Battle of Vera Cruz under the command of the Prince de Joinville. Struck 1847.
  15. L'Éclair was an 18- / 22-gun French barque latine built in Toulon and taken by HMS Leda in the Mediterranean, becoming the ship-sloop HMS Eclair. Plans below were taken prior to her being hulked in 1797. If anyone has an illustration of what her barque latine rig might have looked like, please post. with poop deck without poop deck http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/84064.html Dimensions: 98' x 27' x 12' 230 tons Crew: 166 Armament: QD: 6x 12pdr carronades (in British service) Upper deck: 18x 6pdr gun A half-model of a similar barque latine from Toulon, L’Hirondelle (1743?), can be found in the musee nationale de la Marine, Paris: https://flic.kr/p/f5eBuZ
  16. Swan class ships The class was designed by the Surveyor of the Navy, John Williams, and two vessels to this design (Swan and Kingfisher) were ordered in January 1766. Twenty-three more were ordered to the same design between 1773 and 1779; they formed the 'standard' ship sloop design of the British Navy during the American Revolutionary War, during which eleven of them were lost. Surviving vessels went on to serve during the French Revolutionary War and Napoleonic War. The design provided for 16 gunports (8 per side, excluding the bridle-ports) but one pair was initially left unoccupied, and the ships were always rated at 14 guns. However an eighth pair of guns was added from 1780 onwards to utilise the vacant ports, without any change in the nominal rating. The Swan class sloops were unusually attractive for the type of vessel. Not only did they have sleek hull lines but they also carried an unusual amount of decoration for their size. They were built just before the Admiralty issued orders that all vessels (especially lesser rates and unrated vessels) should have minimal decoration and carvings to save on costs, due to the seemingly ever-continuing war with France and other nations. Following the initial 1766 order for two ships, a second pair was ordered in 1773 (Cygnet and Atalanta) and a further five in 1775 (Pegasus in April, Fly in August, and Swift, Dispatch and Fortune in October); all these were built in the Royal Dockyards. Another five were contracted in November 1775 to be built by commercial shipbuilders (Hound, Hornet, Vulture, Spy and Cormorant), and a further pair during 1776 (Zebraand Cameleon). Another two were ordered from the Royal Dockyards in January 1777 (Fairy and Nymph) and a final seven from commercial constructors over the following 30 months (Savage, Fury, Delight andThorn during 1777, Bonetta and Shark during 1778, and Alligator in 1779). ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- HMS Pegasus Building HMS Pegasus http://modelshipworld.com/index.php/topic/2877-hms-pegasus-by-nils-langemann-1776-1780-scale-164-16-gun-swan-class-sloop-from-amati-victory-models-plan/ ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ HMS Vulture HMS Vulture was a 14 gun ship sloop of the Swan class, launched on 18 March 1776. She served during both the American Revolutionary War and the French Revolutionary War before being sold for disposal in 1802.Vulture is perhaps best known for being the warship to which Benedict Arnold fled on the Hudson River in 1780 after unsuccessfully trying to betray the Continental Army's fortress at West Point, New York to the British. HMS Vulture Build Log Resurrection http://modelshipworld.com/index.php?/topic/230-hms-vulture-by-dan-vadas-1776-148-scale-16-gun-swan-class-sloop-from-tffm-plans/ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- HMS Atlanta A photo Journal http://www.admiraltymodels.com/Atalantapart1.pdf http://www.admiraltymodels.com/Atalantapart2.pdf -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- HMS Kingfisher HMS Kingfisher (also spelled King's Fisher or Kingsfisher) was the second ship in the 14-gun Swan class of ship sloops, to which design 25 vessels were built in the 1760s and 1770s. She was launched on 13 July 1770 at Chatham Dockyard, and completed there on 21 November 1770. She took part in the American Revolutionary War, enforcing the blockade of the Delaware Bay, and served in the Battle of Turtle Gut Inlet, near Cape May, New Jersey. While under the temporary command of Lieutenant Hugh Christian, she was burnt by her own crew to avoid capture on 7 August 1778 in Narragansett Bay during the Battle of Rhode Island.[1] ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ HMS Fly HMS Fly was a Swan class ship sloop of the Royal Navy and was launched on 14 September 1776. She performed mainly convoy escort duties during the French Revolutionary Wars, though she did capture three privateers. She foundered and was lost with all hands early in 1802. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Unknown Swan type ship Info page: http://www.admiraltymodels.com/Models.html
  17. USS Vandalia (1828) The first Vandalia was an 18-gun sloop-of-war in the United States Navy during the Second Seminole War and the American Civil War. She was named for the city of Vandalia, Illinois. Vandalia was laid down at the Philadelphia Navy Yard in 1825; launched in 1828; and commissioned on 6 November of that year, Commander John Gallagher in command. Complement: 150 officers and enlisted Armament: 4 × 8 in (200 mm) shell guns 16 × 32-pounder guns
  18. La Mignonne (1765-1797) French, 8-pdr, 30 guns Builder : C. Saussillon (Toulon) 122'2" x 32' x 15'9" (french ft) 26 x 8-pdr + 4 x 4-pdr Razeed in 1793, converting her to a corvette. Captured by the British in 1794. Sources : Boudriot, History of the French Frigate, p. 78-79, 88 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_frigate_Mignonne_(1767)
  19. Privateer Ships by Fredrik Henrik af Chapman Index 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.
  20. I have been looking around for various bits of data on the Rattlesnake and learned that the bowsprit gets in the way of the bow ports making the Rattlesnake an 18 gun ship rather than a 20 gun ship like many sites claim. Not only that but the ship can only carry 4 pounder guns. I measured a few 6 pounders from different plans and they did seem too tall for the ports. Some ship models showed them being too tall for the ports too, the guns aiming down sometimes. Anyway looking at the options, I was wondering if you guys know if chase guns positioned like this could be possible. Its similar to the chase guns on the gun deck of the Trincomalee ingame. The arc of fire would be somewhat limited but the elevation is very good. Maybe there's something I don't know? It would seem logical to me that the gundeck sides would be clear of any obstructions and 4 different Rattlesnake plans showed me nothing else but the bowsprit at the front. But you never know when something might be left out of the plan.
  21. 'Oliver Cromwell' This vessel, 80 feet keel, 27 feet beam, 12 feet depth of hold, was ordered built at Saybrook (Essex) by the General Assembly January 81st, 1776, and was the largest full-rigged ship constructed for the State under the general direction of the Governor and Council of Safety. Uriah Hayden, ship builder, was chosen to do the work under the supervision of Capt. Seth Harding, who was paid £32.6.9 for his services, according to voucher dated Jan. 30, 1776, on file, and various payments were made beginning April 2,1776, and continuing to October 23, 1776, as the work progressed, during which time £1750 had been paid, according to orders on the Committee of the Pay Table drawn by Benjamin Huntington, Clerk of the Council. These payments included provision for rigging which was furnished by Ephraim Bill; Wm. Lax for making the gun carriages; Nathaniel Wales for muskets and gun locks, and Capt.. Benj. Williams for iron and blacksmith work. The Cromwell was launched at Saybrook on Thursday, June 13, 1776. On Thursday night, August 1, 1776, she was struck by lightning, which did considerable damage to her main and mizzen masts, but repairs were quickly made, and on Sunday, August 18th, the new ship of war Oliver Cromwell, commanded by William Coit, Esq., sailed out of Connecticut River and arrived at New London on Tuesday, August 20th, 1776, the largest craft that had ever come over Saybrook bar, and piloted by James Harris. On Oct. 22, 1776, Titus Hosmer, a member of the Council, gave an order to Mr. Buell for 40 firearms to be delivered to Captain Coit for the use of the ship. The next day James Tilly of Saybrook was allowed £400 for cordage, and Levi Young was appointed Master and warrant as such issued by the Governor. Captain Coit also received two months cruising orders and Nathaniel Shaw of New London was directed to supply the ship with whatever it needed. On Nov. 15th, Captain Colt was allowed £1,000 for the use of the ship and Mr. Shaw £2,000 for public use. Dr. Samuel Lee of Windham was appointed Surgeon of the Cromwell on the same day. On Dec. 14, 1776, Nathl. Shaw was authorized to draw a letter of credit in favor of Captain Coit, for use when necessary, for repairs or supplies while in any foreign port, and Dr. Albigence Waldo was appointed Chief Surgeon of the ship, as evidently Dr. Lee resigned...
  22. We all know that sometimes ships of the line were cut-down one deck and became razées, powerfull frigates. The most notable example of this kind of ships within the timeframe of NA most probably is the Indefatigable. What´s probably less known is that a couple of frigates also had their quarterdeck and forecastle deck removed and were reclassed as sloops of war / corvettes. A couple of examples of this pretty interesting ship type: USS John Adams Launched 1799 (armament 24 12-pounders + 2 12-pounder bow chasers, 6 24-pound carronades), cut down to a sloop in 1807-09 with 24 42-pound carronades and 2 12-pounder bow chasers. I found plans for the John Adams as frigate (by our fellow captain Talos, by the way), but regretably none for the sloop. La Circée (Armide-class) Launched 1811, converted to a corvette sans gaillards in 1832. Armament: 24 long 18-pounders and 4 short 30-pounders. Plans for La Circée as a sloop from the Atlas du Génie Maritime: As the captain of La Circée after her conversion observed in his logbook, the vastly improved speed and maneuverabilty of his frégate rasée 'could do much harm to the enemy', but he raised concerns about the lack of sufficient space for the crew. The 18-pounder frigates L'Aréthuse and La Cybèle (both Pallas-class) were also razeed in the early 1830s, the 40-gun frigates of the 1824 program, L'Arthémise and La Galathée, were converted while still in the docks, carrying 24 short 30-pounders and 6 18-pound carronades after launch. Samarang (Atholl-class) Designed as small 28-gun 'jack-ass' frigates, some ships of this class were cut down to sloops. Class design: http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/83004.html Model of the Samarang after her conversion: http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/66666.html Armament as sloop: 18 32-pound carronades, 2 long 9-pounders
  23. Lexington, Specifications: Length between perpendiculars: 127’ Beam (molded): 33’6” Depth in hold: 15’3” Tonnage: 691 tons Complement: 190 US-Corvet "Lexington", 26 guns 18-pdr. A big thank you to Talos who recognized the ship in an instant and provided some very interesting information. For a more elaborate history, scroll down a few comments! The more detailed plans, courtesy of Talos, are found is his comment as well.
  24. Wasp was a ship-rigged sloop-of-war constructed in 1813 at Newburyport, Massachusetts, by Cross & Merrill. She was commissioned early in 1814, Master Commandant Johnston Blakeley in command. She remained at Portsmouth, New Hampshire, until late spring awaiting sailing orders and, upon receipt of them, put to sea on 1 May 1814 for a war cruise to the western approaches to the English Channel. Here is a list of the ships captured by Wasp during her first raiding voyage in the English Channel. June 2, 1814, Wasp captured her first vessel, the 207-ton barque Neptune. June 13, 1814, she took William, a 91-ton brig. June 18, 1814, Wasp encountered the 131-ton armed brig Pallas without resistance. June 23, 1814, 171-ton galiot Henrietta, June 26, 1814, Wasp captured the 325-ton ship Orange Boven. June 28, 1814, Wasp engaged the 18-gun Cruizer class brig-sloop HMS Reindeer. July 4, 1814, 112-ton brig Regulator July 6, 1814, 151-ton schooner Jenny Second raiding voyage August 30, 1814, she captured the brig Lettice August 31, 1814, she captured Bon Accord. September 1, 1814, she captured the brig Mary and the 18-gun, 391-ton brig HMS Avon. September 12, 1814, she encountered Three Brothers, a brig, September 14, 1814, she sank the brig Bacchus. September 21, 1814, captured the eight-gun brig, Atlanta Fate Wasp was last seen by a Swedish merchantman bound from Rio de Janeiro to Falmouth, England, about three weeks after the Atalanta capture and was said to be headed for the Caribbean. Wasp probably foundered in a storm. Specifications Tonnage: 509 Length: 117 ft 0 in (35.66 m) Beam: 31 ft 6 in (9.60 m) Draft: 14 ft 6 in (4.42 m) Complement: 173 officers and enlisted men Armament: 2 x long 12-pounder guns + 20 x 32-pounder carronades USS Wasp had a short but illustrious carer during the war of 1812, capturing 15 enemy ships. She would also be the basis for future American flush-decked sloop of war designs. She would be a nice ship to sail in Naval Action.
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