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maturin

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maturin last won the day on February 18

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About maturin

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  1. maturin

    Ideas for new gunnery mechanics and also swivels baby!

    Accounts of close actions regularly reference the quarterdecks being swept clean by sharpshooters, and the number of dead officers backs this up. Then there are the tactics of 1600s buccaneers, picking off the crew with muskets exclusively. With a long battle and a lot of barrels, inaccuracy doesn't mean low lethality.
  2. maturin

    Additional Buffs to Battle Sails

    No one needs to be aloft to perform maneuvers. With the possible exception of setting up the breast backstay on the new tack, or shifting the tack of upper staysails, but this can be done at leisure in good weather.
  3. maturin

    Additional Buffs to Battle Sails

    Tacking a 74 gun ship under full sails requires around 40% of the crew. So you can do NA-like maneuvers in action (take a look at diagrams of some famous frigate duels for examples of this), but it will take manpower away from the guns. It would also be very hazardous to set all your sails up to royals, and then not have the men on hand to brace the yards in a timely manner. So it is reasonable for the steady state to require the manpower.
  4. maturin

    Additional Buffs to Battle Sails

    You're exaggerating. Yes, obviously with less canvas set you need fewer men concentrating on sailhandling. They don't need to be 'aloft', but that is the sole inaccuracy in his post. If you need to immediately and simultaneously brace around all thirteen square yards on Constitution (nevermind the gaff mizzen, its topsail, all the staysails and headsails), you will need an awful lot of men queued up on the lines ahead of time. And that is the state of affairs represented by Full Sail in this game, and it's what players expect to do in action. A suitably severe time penalty on sailhandling and bracing might be overkill from a gameplay perspective, however.
  5. No you didn't, unless you want to let me borrow your time machine. Constitution has only sailed outside the confines of Boston harbor once in living memory. She set her topsails in mild weather and made 4-6 kts (perfectly respectable in those conditions). Are you sure you want to claim that an 18th Century warship was sailing faster than the wind? I think you need to accept that you have very little expertise in this topic. I live two hours from Boston and have toured Constitution several times. It's always a great trip, but I could name a few factual errors the Navy guides have made just in my experience, so it's not much of a claim to authority. Your accusations of bias are extremely petulant and shabby and you should be ashamed of yourself. Edit: This is a great read. https://ussconstitutionmuseum.org/2017/08/04/eagle-of-the-seas/ In 1997 she made 4.5 kts under topsails alone in 7 kts of breeze. In case anyone cared to doubt her record for ghosting along in light airs and outrunning British pursuers. Some ships would barely be moving, if you refer to windspeed tables compiled by Boudriot. And really, if the ship were really an overweight pig, pinned down by the supposedly prodigious mass of all that live oak, certainly a light breeze would be when you would notice the defect?
  6. Your skepticism is misplaced. 13 kts as the highest recorded speed comes from the Constitution Museum, which is a more authoritative source than any individual book written about her. Also, no one is going to make 13 knots when flying studdingsails, because you only use stuns'ls when the wind is too light reach your best speed anyway. Constitution was a big, powerful ship and would have made her records in a stiff breeze of over 15 kts, just like the line of battle ships that are recorded to have made 12 and 13 kts. Are you skeptical about those reports too? You are using painfully videogame-inflected logic when you cast doubt on the weight of the live oak. These are not airplanes. Weight does not matter. It just makes your draft deeper, and all these large warships are designed to be laden deep and sailed hard. Some extra heft helps you out with it comes to slamming through the seas. The Lively-class frigates sailed worse as their center of gravity became higher. At the end of the day, size is the close companion of speed. Any large, well-found ship with a 3.5:1 length:breadth ratio and a high sail area:displacement ratio ought to be a flyer, even if she has a very deep draft due to weighty construction. In the 19th Century the cargos only got bigger and the drafts deeper, but the speeds doubled. And yet there is a log entry recording a speed of 14 kts over a several hour period. This in the Med, a decade of more after the end of the War of 1812. There is a clear-cut record of a new design with significant teething problems that were resolved in time. The first British razees and the French 24-pounder frigates went through the same process. But Fama is a two-decker super frigate, right?
  7. maturin

    Classic Connie--Your Killing Us Here!

    Victory has a literal gift shop built into her stern, lol. They just need to add a Starbucks and a bordello to round out her 'commission'. Not that Constitution is that far ahead in real capabilities.
  8. maturin

    Damage and sinking

    Please put a trigger warning on posts containing E:TW screens. Those "masts"... it turns my stomach. And Sir Francis Drake wants his paint scheme back.
  9. maturin

    Historical accuracy of Endymion Appearance

    The Lynx model is definitely the reproduction ship, which differs wildly from the historical vessel. There is essentially no relation. Well, let's call a spade a spade here. Pride's stability was deficient. Yes, there was possibly a microburst, but it does not take an extraordinary event to capsize an overcanvased vessel with loads of tophamper and low freeboard. She could have been knocked over by less. She also could have easily survived the squall that claimed her, had the sailplan and response been different. Just as she had faced bad weather on countless other passages. Likewise, historical Baltimore clippers relied on good seamanship and conservative sailtrim to keep them safe. Also, Pride II is a very different ship, much heavier with a lower sail area:displacement ratio. AFAIK she is actually faster, though, because she was built for voyages and not as a dockside attraction with saggy rigging.
  10. maturin

    Historical accuracy of Endymion Appearance

    Err, you definitely misspoke there. Privateers had a low success rate, but this was mostly down to luck and skill. No privateer was too slow to catch any prizes, or it wouldn't have been fitted out in the first place. If Fame of Salem (neither large nor purpose built) could do it, anyone can: https://schoonerfame.com/fame-the-war-of-1812/ Lynx is definitely too small to be particularly fast. Now that is all highly tendentious. The British and French bought dozens of American schooners into service over several decades. You didn't often see cutters and luggers being tapped for Transatlantic or global service, either. For what it's worth, Pride of Baltimore II has reached higher speeds than virtually every Napoleonic frigate ever launched, and on a broad reach where a topsail schooner is fastest.
  11. The hull is based on the real Surprise (L'Unite), with the rig and paint scheme from Master and Commander.
  12. maturin

    Ship Usefulness.

    Oh hooray. The founding fallacy of the forums. And yet somehow people have premarital sex nowadays but the Abrahamic religions haven't collapsed because of <100% scriptural compliance. Plenty of ships could/can make good headway above 80°.
  13. maturin

    Sterncamping realism - possible solution

    Poop deck Quarterdeck Upper deck Middle deck Gun deck (2-4 ports only) So that's more like 120 people.
  14. maturin

    Demasting / dismasting

    NA players use the word as a verb or a modifer. 'Demast him' or 'demast challenge'. Demast is more commonly used in English than Dismast,* and I think the former is awkward to pronounce. But when you add a suffix, the situation is reversed. Written sources used the word as a participle. 'was dismasted.' Dismasted is used more commonly in English than Demasted.* In this context, Dismasted is much classier. *You can see this in Google results.
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