Jump to content
Game-Labs Forum

William the Drake

Tester
  • Content Count

    947
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

898 Excellent

About William the Drake

  • Rank
    Lieutenant
  • Birthday 06/25/1993

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Louisiana, U.S.A.
  • Interests
    Military History. Greco-Roman, Discovery/Revolutionary Age, Age of Sail (Especially Pirate!), Feudal Japan, and WWII (European Front) History are my specialties.

Recent Profile Visitors

1,659 profile views
  1. William the Drake

    A smaller map

    The first map we had was superb: a huge, vast expanse that required planning and (if you were playing with others) coordination. It would take ~25 minutes to sail the length of Hispaniola. It meant no quick runs to defend or attack a port. It meant that cruising and trade runs held that air of instability. Boring? Sure, but it still is, and will be no matter how small the map is. It is the nature of travel in any game (from EVE to ArcheAge to PotBS). Shrinking the map the first time was the moment Naval Action shifted from the dream, to appease the masses. It was a great big world full of possibility, and ever since it has only gotten smaller at the request of the community (overall content, not just the map)
  2. William the Drake

    "HMS" New Age of Sail game coming in 2018

    Getting a very Bomber Crew vibe from it. Looks interesting enough.
  3. William the Drake

    The Portrait of the Native America

    I would like to bring to the attention of the developers an interesting incident that has recently occurred in the video game world and which is pertinent to the subject matter of This land is my land. Recently, Civilization VI announced that the Cree Nation would be introduced in its upcoming expansion Rise and Fall and led by Pîhtokahanapiwiyin, more commonly known as Chief Poundmaker. Personally, I was excited to see the first Native American leader and civilization coming to the most recent Civ iteration, and to join the likes of other Native American tribes that have been a part of the series, such as Hiawatha of the Iroquois, Pocatello of the Shoshone, and Sitting Bull of the Lakota. But then I came across this article: Cree Nation Leader unhappy with Civilization 6 portrayal It was an interesting turn of events, and it will continue to be so as the situation evolves, i.e. if Firaxis releases an official response. Now taking the statement into account, as someone who plays Civ VI avidly and having seen the release video for the Cree, I would argue that the civilization is heavily geared to a more peaceful role around things like trade and culture. However the Cree representative may be commenting more on the grand aspect of the game, in which the Cree would be competing with other world powers for territory and general dominance. More to the point, I believe this should be something that the developers of This land is my land for a number of reasons: 1. It shows that you need to be aware of the peoples, cultures, and views you are representing in your game. It is essential to be aware that you are designing a game in which the characters represent a real population. Not only that, but it represents a peoples and time period that was tumultuous for them and for which many are still living with an in the bounds of the consequences of that time period. While this may be chalked up to mere "history" elsewhere, the peoples who are being represented may feel differently, I was lucky enough two years ago that, while attending the National Council For the Social Studies Conference, I was able to sit in on a general meeting of Native American teachers and educators. One of the biggest topics was how Native American history was being taught, as well as how it represented Native Americans, not only in a historical sense, but also in a contemporary one. One of the teachers commented that "The biggest challenge facing us is that many of these kids think that [Native Americans] are just a part of history and that we're gone to history and that we're just another chapter in the textbook. We're not. They need to know that [Native Americans] are still here and they could be anyone; they could be your neighbor, your lawyer, your teacher (room laughs) or whatever. We're not always wearing moccasins, we wear suits and shirts just like them." The key is keeping in mind that while the game may take place in a historical setting, it will be representing peoples that still very much identify separately from the general populace (in many cases technically being separate nations, but that gets into the confusing legal background concerning the Native American tribes and the U.S. Government) 2. It shows that design decisions have repercussions. This means that the way a character is created, written, designed, etc are all incredibly important beyond the aspect of the parameters of the game. Especially for a game that is interested as being historically authentic and accurate, proper representation will be of paramount importance for both the authenticity and how it resonates with the peoples it represents. 3. It shows that anyone can be criticized or called out for misrepresentation, intentional or not. Lastly, and arguably most importantly for the This land is my land team and Game-Labs as a whole, this incident shows that anyone, including game companies can, have, and will be called out for various misrepresentation. Remember, this isn't some indie developer that the Cree Nation is calling at fault, its Firaxis and 2K, heavy-hitting, big-time developers, and on top of that it's the Civilization Franchise, one of the most successful PC Franchises of all time. At the end of the day, the biggest concern regarding the Cree Nation-Civilization VI story is that Firaxis failed to meet with Cree leaders and elders when considering the prior to developing the in-game counterpart, something that could have easily been done, far easier than say meeting with top Russian or Chinese representatives (though who knows), especially considering the rather unique nature of the First Nations Tribes of the Americas. Considering the more specific topic of This land is my land, I would argue that this is an aspect that the developers could and should keep in serious consideration. Not only would working closely with the real-life counterparts of the planned in-game tribes be beneficial to avoiding similar incidents as the above, but would also be incredibly beneficial to lending to the authenticity and accuracy of the game (if it has not yet been considered of course).
  4. William the Drake

    French Frigate L'Hermione

    So in-game L'Hermione does not have figurehead or nameplate, any reason for this?
  5. William the Drake

    This land is my land - new game in development

    Clearly looking like it takes place in the American Frontier west, so we will be playing as [one of?] the various plains tribes. One of the first things that came into mind I'm rather excited for is the soundtrack and voice acting. i hope you plan for a lot of on-the-ground support for these, as authentic sounds and music would go a long way. (see Kisima Innitchuna) As a single player game, will it be more of an open sandbox? Or story driven (or both?) If sandbox, will we have a selection of tribes to choose from (apache, navajo, Lakota/Dakota, etc)
  6. William the Drake

    Favorite Civil War Era Music

    I have an album by David Kincaid, The Irish Volunteer It's a collection of Irish marching songs, mainly centered around the 69th New York, with Kincaid adding the tune when needed. It's some solid stuff.
  7. William the Drake

    American Independence and the Frigate of Freedom

    You are correct, I did in fact travel to the Philadelphia-Camden festival, but I was not able to see either parades of sail in or out of the harbor. It was easily one of my favorite trips I have ever taken and most certainly solidified my love of sailing ships. I believe I ended up uploading a number of my own pictures here on the Naval Action website as well.
  8. William the Drake

    Gettysburg and Independence Day

    It's not just me; its the curriculum. This "liberal education" conspiracy theory is nonsense. I once asked a senior teacher what she thought of some local legislation that would enforce the teaching of "only things that highlight American exceptionalism" her response: "We teach history, and we will continue teaching history" This was in central louisiana where a population of the schools had the more "country" students refereed to themselves as the "camo clan" In these places, and mostly in southern states, the view that is pushed is that slaver was a non-issue. That is just as farcical as stating it was the only issue. As teachers, we have to combat both, but not only teaching but also being brought up in the south, I has see far more of the former than the prior. And it doesn't help when there are local monuments openly celebrating the opposition to further that narrative. Again, there is a difference between having something to remember past events vs something that is specifically design to celebrate it, where the local lore is that the monument is "defiantly looking his immortal enemy, the North." Does it deserve to come down. Yes. Does it deserve to be destroyed. No. It belongs in a museum. Otherwise people will make up their own history that teachers have to deal with. On both sides.
  9. William the Drake

    Gettysburg and Independence Day

    False. I teach history. In the south. We teach that the road to Civil War was in fact paved with numerous causes. However, what we must combat is the very nonsense that slavery was a non-issue in the culmination of war. Six confederate states mention slavery as a reason to secede in their articles of secession. Four say it is the MOST important reason. Three mention white supremacy: "Our position is thoroughly identified with the institution of slavery-- the greatest material interest of the world." -2nd line of the Mississippi Deceleration of Secession.
  10. William the Drake

    American Independence and the Frigate of Freedom

    In celebration of our Independence this 4th of July, we should do well to remember our closest and staunchest allies, and the ship that helped us win our freedom: America owes quite a bit to the French, be it the Democratic ideals influenced by philosophers like Rousseau, or the shared concepts of liberty. But America may very well owe its very existence to France, and its all centered around a ship unofficially and aptly dubbed the "Frigate of Liberty," L'Hermione. The French Frigate L'Hermione was a light corvette style, Concorde-class ship built out of Rochefort, France. Her role was simple: a fast and maneuverable frigate that would ultimately be used as a courier. L'Hermione's claim to fame would be ferrying none other than the young French aristocrat and statesman, the Marquis de Lafayette, to America to assist in its raging Revolution. The assistance of Lafayette was the first open act of support by France to America during the Revolution (France had long been secretly smuggling supplies to America, but nothing official). This would be the act that helped foster and furnish the Franco-American romance that would secure America's Independence, as the young (aged only 19!) Lafayette would develop a steadfast friendship with none other than George Washington. Seeing his potential, Washington would place Lafayette in a place of authority in the new American Continental Army, making Lafayette a general. Lafayette would prove to be crafty and cunning, covering Washington's retreat from the battle of Brandywine, and would would help lead American troops to victory in the Battle of Barren Hill, Monmouth, and others. The deliverance of Lafayette by L'Hermione would secure the assistance of France on the American side that would later come officially and in full force after the battle of Saratoga. It would be this French support, mainly via the assistance of the powerful French Navy, that would ultimately ensure America's victory and independence, as it would be a French naval blockade that would trap Cornwallis at Yorktown, forcing him to surrender to the besieging American troops. This is why L'Hermione is often called the "Frigate of Liberty" and why it is just a central a part of American Freedom as any other. So this 4th of July, don' forget to say "Vive la France, Vive la Liberte, et viva L'Hermione!"
  11. William the Drake

    Gettysburg and Independence Day

    Precisely my point: I am all for remembering those who fought on either side. Remembering that they were willing to fight for what they believed in, not the cause itself. It is an entirely different thing between having monuments, iconography, etc. in a museum or similar setting vs. having a monument dedicated in celebration (and erected long after the conclusion of the war) in which the local lore is that the statue is "defiantly facing the enemy, the north" There is a clear difference in purpose and meaning in both; one benign and one, in the sense of a country that holds personal liberty as paramount, malicious. and @A. P. Hill nice attempt at a red herring; close, but no cigar: what we are talking about here is specifically chattel slavery in America and that when the choice came up, half of the country openly decided it would rather leave than try to continue the democratic experiment that many of those same people would claim today to champion. Opinion regarding other forms in history, while not unimportant in the grand scheme, is not relevant here.
  12. William the Drake

    Gettysburg and Independence Day

    Get over yourself Hill; there's a major difference between observing the events and actions of the past and learning the lessons from them, and celebrating groups and individuals who would see the nation split on grounds of the subjugation of others. So yes, we should all do well to remember those that fought, and to observe that "War is Hell," and that it is good that it is so, "otherwise we should grow too fond of it"
  13. William the Drake

    Rookie Ships and Missions

    The new Rookie Snow and Rookie Brig have been added to the lower tier missions. However, it appears they have been added to the 7th rate missions, missions that only allow for 7th rate ships (cutter through Privateer) enter. Despite being "rookie" in nature, they still outclass the player, and anyone player looking to grind missions on their own will be drastically discouraged. I have also heard that the upper level missions have also been changed to have higher tier ships. Has this been intentional? Or is this a bug with the new patch?
  14. William the Drake

    Thinking of turning Pirate

    Ahh, my mistake. And my how I envy the Global server now
  15. William the Drake

    Thinking of turning Pirate

    As it stands, pirate is just another nation with a crafting cap, FFA mode, and a whole lotta salt in chat, due to said FFA mechanic. As it stands many pirates have in fact defected to the other Nations (mainly Britain) because of this. Pirate isn't necessarily hard, but rather annoying instead. With people like Vicious leading the pirate charge, and all manner of vitriol in the nation chat, Pirate does not endear a fun experience. I'd personally wait for the next patch that claims to introduce raids to see if pirate is worth changing to. Hopefully we will see a movement to a more unique pirate play style that is actually worth going on the account.
×