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Found 143 results

  1. HMS Carysfort was a 9pdr armed, 28 gun, sixth-rate frigate of the Coventry Class, built by the Royal Dockyard at Sheerness. The 28 gun, sixth rate frigate was the smallest vessel of the Royal Navy to meet the definition of a Frigate. Vessels carrying 20 or more guns, but less than 28 guns were classed as sixth rate Post Ships. The Coventry Class was a group of 19 small frigates designed by Sir Thomas Slade, Co-Surveyor of the Navy at the time, of which nine were built in Kent shipyards. The Coventry Class were built in four batches. The first batch of four ships were all ordered in 1756. The second batch of five ships were all built from fir rather than oak for speed of construction and all had short service careers. They were all ordered in 1757. The third batch of nine ships, of which HMS Carysfort was a part, eight of which were also ordered in 1757. They were all oak-built. Although a batch three ship, HMS Carysfort was the last to be ordered, with Sheerness Dockyard not being ordered to build her until 1761. The fourth batch, of two ships was not ordered until 1782, though in the end only one was built. This is because the order for the second ship was cancelled after the shipyard contracted to build her went bust and the contract was not re-placed with anyone else. Sir Thomas Slade is now more famous for what is widely regarded as his masterpiece, the first rate ship HMS Victory. HMS Carysfort was ordered from the Royal Dockyard at Sheerness by the Navy Board on 20th February 1761. At the time the ship was ordered, the Seven Years War was at it's height and the naval element of the war was going very well for the British. From the beginning of the war, the Royal Navy had taken the war to their French and Spanish enemies by attacking their overseas possessions in places all over the world from India and the Pacific Ocean to the Carribean. For that reason, the Seven Years War is regarded as being the first true world war. The Royal Dockyard at Sheerness was working flat out with the repair of warships in addition to the fitting out of warships built at private shipyards on the East and South Kent coasts. In addition to that, the Dockyard at Sheerness only had one slipway and at the time the order for HMS Carysfort came in, that slipway was reserved for the construction of two Niger Class, 12pdr armed, 32 gun frigates. When the order arrived, HMS Montreal was in the final stages of construction and when that ship was launched in September 1761, construction of the next one, HMS Winchelsea began. That ship wasn't launched until May of 1764. For that reason her first keel section wasn't laid on the slipway at Sheerness until June of 1764, by which time the war was over. Her construction was overseen by two Master Shipwrights at Sheerness. Mr John Williams supervised the work in the Mould Loft and the initial stages of her build and when he was promoted to the position of Master Shipwright at Deptford Royal Dockyard in June 1765, he handed the project to his successor at Sheerness, Mr William Gray. He oversaw her final construction and launch on 23rd August 1766. HMS Carysfort was fitted with her guns, masts and rigging at Sheerness and was commissioned into the Royal Navy under Captain George Vandeput in June 1767. On completion, HMS Carysfort was a ship of 586 tons. She was 118ft 4in long on her gundeck, 97ft 3in long at her keel and 33ft 8in wide across her beams. Her hold below the orlop was 10ft 6in deep. HMS Carysfort was armed with 24 9pdr long guns on her gundeck, 4 3pdr long guns on her quarterdeck and in addition to those there were a dozen half-pounder swivel guns attached to her upper deck handrails and in her fighting tops. She was manned by a crew of 200 officers, men, boys and Royal Marines. Plans of HMS Carysfort HMS Carysfort was Captain Vandeput's second appointment after promotion to Captain. His previous appointment had been as Captain in the 20 gun post-ship HMS Surprise. Prior to that, until the end of the war in 1763, he had been Master and Commander in the ten-gun brig-sloop HMS Goree. That vessel had originally been built way back in 1729 as the hoy HMS Hayling but had been converted to carry ten 6pdr long guns, rerigged as a brig and renamed. The normal size of a hoy was around the 60 ton mark and they carried a single mast, but HMS Goree was twice that size. Vandeput had been her final commander before the vessel had been decommissioned and broken up in 1763. With the end of the Seven Years War, thousands of sailors of all ranks were being laid off. At the end of his appointment as Master and Commander in an unrated vessel and without a further appointment, an officer like George Vandeput would normally have reverted to his substantive rank of Lieutenant and would have been laid off on half pay. However, George Vandeput's father, also George was not only a Vice-Admiral, but was a Baronet and an MP to boot, so it's hardly suprising that the junior George Vandeput was promoted at the end of his appointment in HMS Goree and given a command as soon as one became available. On 20th September 1767, HMS Carysfort sailed for the Mediterranean. Her role would have been that of a Royal Navy frigate in peacetime, that of showing the flag and protecting British shipping against attacks by Barbary Corsairs and other pirates. In February 1770, Captain Vandeput was appointed to command the 28 gun sixth rate frigate HMS Solebay and his place in HMS Carysfort was taken by Captain William Hay. Captain Vandeput went on to have a long career in the Royal Navy. Despite being an illegitimate son, he inherited the baronetcy on his father's death and rose to become a full Admiral and served as Commander-in-Chief of the North America Station based in Halifax, Nova Scotia from 1797 until his death at sea in 1800 aboard his flagship, the 64 gun third rate ship of the line HMS Asia. Captain William Hay was an experienced commander who had first held a command at the beginning of the Seven Years War, so was an ideal candidate to command a frigate in peacetime, able to make his own decisions and act on his own initiative, potentially thousands of miles from the nearest higher authority. Shortly after assuming command of HMS Carysfort, Captain Hay received orders to take his ship to the West Indies, to carry out the same role as before, but based in Jamaica. The ship continued in this role until July 1773, when she returned home to Plymouth and was paid off. Although HMS Carysfort was decommissioned, she was never fitted for the Ordinary and spent the next two and a half years secured to a mooring bouy at Plymouth. She would have had a skeleton crew aboard, consisting of her Boatswain, her Gunner, her Carpenter, a Pursers Mate and their respective servants and any maintenance work which would have been required was carried out by gangs of labourers from the dockyard who would have come out to the ship to carry it out. In December 1775, the ship was recommissioned to serve in home waters under Captain Robert Fanshawe. By this time, war was in the air. In order to try to service the huge mountain of debt run up during the Seven Years War, the British Government had attempted to impose taxes on the colonies in America. This had led to political protests, which had escalated into civil unrest and by the time the ship recommissioned, had escalated into a full-scale armed rebellion, with regular British troops being driven off by the part-time soldiers of the Massachusetts Militia in the skirmishes at Concord and Lexington. The war continued to escalate and between April and May 1777, HMS Carysfort underwent a short refit at Plymouth. Meanwhile, in America, things were going from bad to worse. From 1776, the French had been secretly supplying arms, ammunition and money to the American rebels. Their support escalated into ships operating under rebel colours as privateers and what would today be called 'Military Advisors'. After the rebels defeated the British in two battles at Saratoga in 1777, the French invited the rebels to conclude a Treaty of Alliance. King Louis XVI was concerned at reports that following their defeats at Saratoga and the fact that up to that point the rebels were winning, that the British were about to make major concessions. The reports were true. The British parliament had proposed offering the Americans terms which basically gave them what they wanted. These were, never to impose taxes on the colonies again from London without the consent of the people, not to station more troops in the colonies, to repeal all the objectionable acts, full pardons for everyone involved in the rebellion and a cessation of hostilities. A commission was formed which was empowered to negotiate directly with the rebels and agree whatever terms were needed. In order to thwart this, the French signed the Treaty of Alliance with the Americans on 6th February 1778. This Treaty formally recognised the United States of America for the first time and committed the Americans to seeking nothing less than full independence from the UK in return for unlimited amounts of military assistance and money from France. The British hoped that the Americans would respond positively to their offers, but the Americans demanded that the British withdraw all their troops or formally recognise American independence before they were willing to negotiate with the Commission. Their advances to the Americans rejected, on June 17th 1778, Britain formally declared war on France. By September 1778, HMS Carysfort was engaged in operations against the Americans and was the flagship of a force of troopships carrying some 4,000 troops commanded by Major-General Charles Grey, the First Earl Grey. His force of troops had been ordered by General Sir Henry Clinton, the Army Commander-in-Chief, to reduce the area around the Connecticut and Massachusetts Coasts from Long Island as far north as Cape Cod. This was to be achieved by means of a series of large-scale amphibious raids. In the first raid, the fleet sailed up the Acushnet River towards New Bedford and Fairhaven. The troops were landed on Clarks Point on 4th September and spent the night and the next day burning wharves, warehouses and vessels along the whole length of the river. On 6th September, a raid was launched against Fairhaven, but this raid was repelled by a stout defence conducted by the Massachusetts Militia. On September 10th, the force raided the island of Martha's Vineyard and seized livestock totalling 10,000 sheep, 130 oxen plus arms and money. The force arrived back in New York on 17th September with the raids having been a success. In November 1778, Captain Fanshawe was appointed to command the 64 gun third rate ship of the line HMS Monmouth and his place in command of HMS Carysfort was taken by Captain William Cumming. HMS Carysfort was his first appointment after promotion to Captain, his previous appointment had been as Master and Commander in the storeship HMS Supply. By this time the ship had returned to the UK and had paid off for a refit in Plymouth. As part of this work, her armament was increased with the replacement of her forecastle and quarterdeck 3pdr guns with 6pdr long guns. To these were added a total of 6 18pdr carronades, four on the quarterdeck and two on the forecastle. Once the work was complete, the ship commissioned into the Downs Squadron of the North Sea Fleet. On 13th June 1779, HMS Carysfort had her first success in her new assignement when she captured the French privateer L'Esperance. In November 1780, Captain Cumming was replaced in command by Captain William Peacock. HMS Carysfort was his first appointment as Captain, his previous appointment had been as Master and Commander in the gun-brig HMS Childers of ten guns and the following month, the ship sailed once again to join the ongoing war in America. On 24th May 1780, Captain Peacock had his first success in command of the ship when they captured the American privateer General Galvez. HMS Carysfort continued serving in the waters off North America for the rest of the war. In October 1781, following the failure of the Royal Navy to secure the entrance to Chesapeake Bay in the Battle of Chesapeake Bay in the September, General Charles, the Lord Cornwallis was forced to surrender with his army in the Seige of Yorktown. This left the British with insufficient troops to defend their possessions in North America and on 27th February 1782, the British Parliament voted to cease all offensive operations in North America and to seek peace. Despite the overwhelming victories of Sir George Rodney and Sir Samuel Hood in the Battle of the Saintes and the Battle of Mona Passage in April 1782, back in London, political support for the already unpopular war evaporated and the Government of Lord North fell. In late April 1782, Parliament voted to end the war, recognise American Independence and open peace negotiations with France, Spain and Holland. The negotiations resulted in the Treaty of Paris, which was signed by all the parties in September 1783 and was effective from March 1784. The last major British possession in mainland North America, New York City, was finally evacuated in November 1783. The Loyalist communities in North America and those Native American tribes who had been allied to the British and the Loyalist cause were left to their fate. In the meantime, in December 1782, Captain Peacock was replaced in command of HMS Carysfort by Captain John Markham, with orders to take the ship back to Deptford and pay her and her crew off, which he did in January 1783. HMS Carysfort's war was over. HMS Carysfort remained laid up in the River Thames, secured to a mooring bouy off the Royal Dockyard at Deptford until April 1785 she was taken upstream to a private shipyard at Rotherhithe in Surrey to undergo a Great Repair. This would have amounted to a virtual rebuilding of the ship and she emerged from this in an 'as new' condition three months later at a cost of £15,255. The ship returned to her bouy off the Royal Dockyard at Deptford where she remained until November the following year. In January 1787, the ship completed fitting for sea at Deptford Royal Dockyard and was commissioned under Captain Matthew Smith. HMS Carysfort was his first command appointment after having paid off the ex-Dutch 20 gun post-ship HMS Saint Eustatius at the end of the war. Captain Smith took the ship to the Mediterranean, where she was engaged in patrolling, showing the flag and protecting British merchant shipping from Barbary Corsairs. She remained in the Mediterranean until May of 1790, when Captain Smith paid the ship and her crew off back at Deptford. Despite the Spanish Armaments Crisis, HMS Carysfort remained laid up in the River Thames until shortly after the outbreak of the French Revolutionary War in February 1793. In April 1793, HMS Carysfort was once again taken into the Deptford Royal Dockyard and was fitted for sea. The work was completed in September 1793 and the ship recommissioned into the Channel Fleet under Captain Francis Laforey. HMS Carysfort was his first appointment as Captain; his previous appointment had been as Master and Commander in the 14 gun ship-sloop HMS Fairy. HMS Carysfort was engaged in enforcing the blockade of the French Atlantic coast and patrolling the English Channel looking for marauding French privateers and warships hoping to prey on British merchant shipping. On 29th May 1794, HMS Carysfort was engaged in a patrol off Lands End when sails were spotted in the distance. These sails belonged to a Dutch merchant brig which was being towed by the ex-HMS Castor, a 12pdr armed 36 gun frigate which had been captured on 9th May when she and her convoy had run into a squadron of French ships of the line. The French immediately cast off the brig and Captain Laforey took his ship into action. On paper, the Castor was markedly superior to HMS Carysfort, having more men, bigger guns and more of them. After an hour and fifteen minutes however, the Castor struck her colours in surrender to Captain Laforey and his men. HMS Carysfort had suffered casualties of one seaman killed and three seamen and one marine wounded. She had suffered some slight damage in her masts, rigging and hull. The Castor on the other hand had had her main topgallant mast shot away, the rest of her main mast was also badly damaged and her hull had been penetrated in several places. She had suffered sixteen officers, marines and seamen killed with nine wounded. On taking possession of the Castor the British learned that the ship was on her way to Lorient to be fitted for service in the French Navy. The French crew of the Castor had been drafted from amongst the crews of the French ships of the line which had captured her and they were totally unfamiliar with the arrangement of the rigging and really only had the slightest idea how to actually operate the ship. The British also freed a Masters Mate and 18 seamen who, being the remainder of her original British crew, were prisoners of war aboard and were presumably there to show the French how to operate the ship. The rest of the ships officers and crew including her captain, Captain Thomas Troubridge, were still being held aboard the flagship of Rear-Admiral Nielly, the French officer commanding the squadron, the Sans Pareil. The would later be freed when the Sans Pareil was captured by HMS Majestic at the Battle of the Glorious First of June. In the meantime, Captain Laforey took the Castor back to Plymouth. On arrival, the Royal Navy refused to pay Captain Laforey or his men any prize-money for the ship. The reason they gave was that Laforey and the men of HMS Carysfort had simply restored HMS Castor to service. They claimed that because the ship had never been to a French dockyard and been converted for French use, she didn't fall within the legal definition of a Prize and all they were entitled to was a payment related to the salvage of the ship. Captain Laforey and his officers were having none of this and the matter came before an Admiralty Court chaired by Sir James Marriot, a senior judge. After hearing the evidence, including a statement from the French captain, M. L'Huillier, he ruled that because the French admiral in command of the squadron which had captured the ship had full powers to condemn, arm, fit out, man and equip any vessels captured by his ships as he saw fit and that on capture by HMS Carysfort, the Castor had a French crew with a French captain, the ship did fall within the definition of a Prize and that the Royal Navy must pay Captain Laforey and his men her full value. HMS Castor was therefore purchased by the Government and was taken back into the Royal Navy. As a reward for his good conduct during the capture of the Castor, Mr Richard Worsley, HMS Carysfort's First Lieutenant, was appointed Master and Commander in the 16 gun ship-sloop HMS Calypso on 24th June 1794. Later in 1794, HMS Caryfort's armament received a considerable boost when her 18pdr carronades were replaced by 24pdr carronades. Captain Francis Laforey remained in command of HMS Carysfort until he was appointed to command the ex-French 12pdr armed 32 gun frigate HMS L'Aimable in June 1795. He rose to fame when he commanded the ex-French 74 gun third rate ship of the line HMS Spartiate at the Battle of Trafalgar. He rose to become a Rear-Admiral, was knighted in 1815 and died in 1835. Captain Laforey's replacement in HMS Carysfort was Captain John Murray whose previous appointment had been as captain in the ex-French sixth-rate post-ship HMS Babet of 20 guns. In the beginning of 1794, the French government was contemplating sending an expedition to attack British commerce in India and to reinforce French garrisons in the region. Knowing that the Royal Navy was pretty much tied up in the Mediterranean, the English Channel, the North Sea and the Carribean, they concluded that British possessions in the far east would be relatively unprotected and would be easy targets. Rich pickings would be had by raiding and plundering them. The expedition was originally due to be commanded by Rear-Admiral Kerguelen with three 74 gun ships, three large frigates plus smaller vessels. Over time, losses mounted in the French Atlantic Fleet with their defeats at the Battle of the Glorious First of June, the Battle of Ile Groix and of course, the continuous blockade. This forced the French to alter their plans, so that by the time the expedition actually sailed on 4th March 1796, it was under the command of Rear-Admiral Sercey and was to comprise the 44 gun frigate Forte, the 36 gun frigate Regeneree, the en-flute armed frigate Seine, the ship-corvette Bonne Citoyenne and the brig-corvette Mutine. The ships were carrying 800 troops, with two companies of artillery and all the stores and ammunition needed. Things began to go wrong immediately. The force was caught in a storm soon after leaving Lorient. The Bonne Citoyenne parted company from the squadron on 7th March after sustaining damage in the storm. This damage slowed the ship sufficiently that she was able to be caught and captured by a force of British frigates led by Captain Robert Stopford in HMS Phaeton. Soon afterward, the Mutine lost her main topmast and was also quickly caught and captured by the British. The Seine also lost her main topmast but was able to recover it and repair the damage. In the meantime, Captain Murray was replaced in command of HMS Carysfort by Captain Thomas Alexander. Captain Murray was appointed to command the 18pdr armed 36 gun frigate HMS Crescent. The French continued to make their way around the Cape of Good Hope and arrived in the port of St Denis on Reunion Island on 18th July 1796. Other ships had also joined the French force so that by this time, Rear-Admiral Sercey's force comprised six large frigates. Also in the force was the privateer schooner Alerte. On 19th August, the Alerte's master decided that he was going to run down and capture a British East Indiaman he had spotted. Little did he know that the East Indiaman was escorted by a frigate of the Royal Navy, HMS Carysfort and no sooner that he had launched his attack, the British frigate arrived on the scene and the Alerte's crew very quickly found themselves prisoners of war. So quick had been the British frigate, that the French had not had the time to throw their confidential papers overboard and the British came into possession of Rear-Admiral Sercey's plans and detailed orders. The French were unaware of this disaster until the force which the British dispatched to deal with them finally caught up with them on 7th September 1796 and brought the French squadron to action. Two British 74 gun, third rate ships of the line, HMS Victorious and HMS Arrogant inflicted such damage on the French force that they were eventually forced to call off the expedition and return to France, all thanks to the swift action of HMS Carysfort and her crew. In December 1796, Captain Alexander was replaced in command by Captain John Turnor. On 16th December 1799, HMS Carysfort arrived in Plymouth. Amongst her crew was the only survivor of HMS Resistance, a 44 gun two-decker which had blown up while laying off Sumatra. Originally, sixteen men had survived the accident and they had survived on a raft which they were trying to sail to Sumatra. A storm had blown up and only five of the men survived this. They were captured by Malay tribesmen, but only one of them managed to escape alive and he was eventually picked up by HMS Carysfort. After her return to the UK, HMS Carysfort was assigned to the Channel Fleet and between April and June of 1801, HMS Carysfort underwent a refit at Portsmouth. On 24th August 1803, HMS Carysfort in company with the armed cutter HMS Fox captured the French vessel La Dunkerque. On 26th March 1804, HMS Carysfort in company with the 18pdr armed 36 gun frigate HMS Apollo left the Cove of Cork with a convoy of 69 merchant ships bound for the Caribbean. At 3am, off the coast of Portugal, heading south-south-east in a strong south-westerly gale, HMS Apollo ran aground and was wrecked with the loss of 61 officers and men, as were over 20 ships of the convoy. In appalling weather, Captain Robert Fanshawe of HMS Carysfort had no option but to order the rest of the convoy to head out to sea and continue their voyage to the West Indies. The ship remained in the West Indies until she was ordered to escort a homebound convoy in company with the armed storeship HMS Dolphin in June of 1806. At the time, this convoy was being hunted by a squadron of French ships of the line under the French Admiral Willaumez. HMS Carysfort and her convoy managed to avoid being caught by the French and made it safely back to the UK. On arrival in the UK, HMS Carysfort was paid off and laid up at Deptford. The reason was that not only was she by now forty years old, but that small frigates like her were by now obsolete. HMS carysfort remained secured to a mooring bouy off the Royal Dockyard at Deptford until she was sold for £1800 on 28th April 1813 and broken up. Source: Kent History Forum, Bilgerat
  2. Looking for history of this ship. Crew - 400 Armament: 33 × Long 32lb 20 × 42lb
  3. HMS Vernon was a 50-gun fourth rate launched in 1832. The ‘Vernon’ was built at Woolwich Dockyard and measured 176 feet in length by 44 feet in the beam and a tonnage of 1511. She was the first large ship designed by William Symonds in 1831. HMS Vernon was a frigate that saw active service in home waters, the Americas and the East Indies between 1832 and 1848.
  4. Saint Nicholas Russian Frigate 34 guns Plans: Source article(in Finnish)/More diagrams and images: http://www.fregattinikolainsurkea.fi/411415125 In English:http://www.fregattinikolainsurkea.fi/426398867 Info(Probably this one):http://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=21081
  5. 'Tretiy' or 'Third' L - 45.72m W - 9.14m Depth - 2.77m Armament 30x24lb Guns 28x3lb Swivel Guns Another 12lb Russian Frigate 'Perviy', 'First' Armament 26x12lb 6x6lb
  6. I've sat the Arethusa model to the side for now and want to go back and do some more hull modelling. As the Arethusa plans weren't too clear (to a novice in ship design/layout) I decided to find a ship with more detailed plans - the HMS Southampton (1757). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Southampton_(1757) Plans: http://richardsmodelboats.webs.com/32gunfrigate.htm Looks like it has been done a number of times in 3D but this is more an exercise to learn more about ships of the time and to get my modelling skills back up to an acceptable level. Very early days, laying down the hull so to speak
  7. As stated above. I, and a lot of other people, would love to see more Dutch ships in the game. I was thinking about this beauty: (The one in the center) Zr.Ms. Prins Friso (Or Prins Frieso, written as in the 16th/17th century) I think she would be a great 3rd or 4th rate in the game, since we lack high rate line ships I think. I'm not sure what she was according to her actual history, since I tried to google it, but I could not find anything useful except that I know this picture for about 2 years now. Maybe the Zr.Ms. Prins Friso could be added to the queue of ships that are waiting to be created into the game? :3 Thanks for reading. Let 'em have it...! FIRE!!! ~ Sirion.
  8. 'Pique' 36x32lb Guns HMS Pique was a wooden fifth-rate sailing frigate of the Royal Navy, launched on 21 July 1834 at Devonport. She was of 1633 tons and had 36 guns. History Under the command of Captain Edward Boxer (3 August 1837 - August 1841), she sailed to North America, the West Indies and the Mediterranean, including operations on the coast of Syria, as part of the squadron led by HMS Cambridge, and including Zebra and Vesuvius. In 1840 Pique saw service in the bombardment of the city of Acre under the command of Admiral Robert Stopford. For the engagement, Pique was assigned to the far northern end of the line, north-northeast of the much larger HMS Waterloo and at a greater distance from the city than the rest of Stopford's fleet. Despite this unfavourable position, accurate gunnery enabled Pique to score several hits on the town. In 2012 renovation works along Acre's city wall uncovered three cannonballs fired by Pique during the battle, the shots having struck within three metres of each other and embedded in the wall at depths of up to 65 centimetres. Between 1841 and 1846 Pique served on the North America and West Indies Station. With HMS Blake, in 1845 she acted as a cable ship for experiments in laying telegraph cable in Portsmouth Harbour. From 26 December 1853 she was commanded by Captain Frederick Nicolson on the Pacific Station, and participated in the 1854 Anglo-French squadron sent to the Russian War and Second Anglo-Chinese War). She was present at the Siege of Petropavlovsk. From 1872 she was a receiving ship, and from 1882 rented as a hospital hulk to Plymouth Borough Council to quarantine sailors who fell victim to a cholera epidemic. She was broken up in 1910. Plans
  9. Hi, Not sure if there is anywhere specific to post work on 3D models but here goes. I've been playing Naval Action for a little bit now and felt it was time to try and get back into 3D modelling after an 8 year break. The first plan I found in these forums was the French Frigate Arethuse so decided to give that a go to ease myself back in. Not sure what model resolution the game takes (or if it would ever be worthy) but this 'test' run will probably be of average resolution. Should be an interesting learning curve using Blender (after coming from Maya). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_frigate_Aréthuse_(1792) Early start. The first 2 were just using the picture plans as is. I had no idea how the rear was made so after this start had a look at a load of reference material and website where people were building models. Pictures 3, 4, and 5 show progress after taking the plans and creating vertical reference image slices along the hull. I was surprisingly close in shape for most of it but was quite out at the front. Oh and ignore the gun holes in the hull, they will be filled in for now - I just wondered how it might look so far More progress when I get the time Simon
  10. You are more than welcome to post history and specs about these ships. Enjoy. Part 1 History Aréthuse (1791) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_frigate_Ar%C3%A9thuse_(1792) Armament: N/A -------------------------------- Armide (1804) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_frigate_Armide_(1804) Armament: French service 28 × 18-pounder long guns 8 × 8-pounders 8 × 36-pounder carronades British service 28 × 18-pounder guns 14 × 32-pounder carronades 2 × 9-pounder guns 2 × 32-pounder carronades Crew - Up to 339 -------------------------------- History Africaine (1795) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_frigate_Africaine_(1798) Armament: French service: 28 × 18-pounder long guns 12 × 8-pounder long guns British service: 28 × 18-pounder guns 14 × 32-pounder carronades 2 × 9-pounder guns + 2 × 32-pounder carronades -------------------------------- Aigle (1801) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Aigle_(1801) Armament: 26 × 18-pounder guns 4 × 9-pounder guns + 8 × 32-pounder carronades 2 × 9-pounder guns + 2 × 32-pounder carronades Crew - Up to 264 -------------------------------- History Amazon (1795) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Amazon_(1795) Armament: N/A -------------------------------- Amazon (1799) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Amazon_(1799) Armament: 28 × 18-pounder guns 2 × 9-pounder guns + 12 × 32-pounder carronades 2 × 9-pounder guns + 2 × 32-pounder carronades Crew - Up to 300 -------------------------------- Part 2 Part 3 Part 4 Sail Plans
  11. I am looking for more info on these Ships. 1. fregat de 'Mary en Hillegonda' 2. driemastschip Johanna Cornelia (Armed Trader?)
  12. Révolutionnaire A very large frigate for her time and extremely fast. Built by the French in 1794, she was captured by the British in the same year. She once averaged 13.5 knots over several hours, chasing and catching one of the fastest French privateers ever! (and breaking the speed record) Again a near perfect ship in sailing qualities, except she couldn’t store enough for the royal navy’s standards, because of her long and low hull. She also served in Sir Edward Pellew’s squadron at the same time as Hornblower would have been on the Indefatigable. She was another favorite and had a fairly long life, lasting until 1822. Battery: Upper deck: 28/30 x 18-pounder guns Quarterdeck: 8 x 9-pounder guns + 6 x 32-pounder carronades Forecastle: 2 x 9-pounder guns + 2 x 32-pounder carrondes The Seine design was slightly improved upon with the 7-strong Gloire class. One of the Gloire class ships became the basis for the 13 ships of the English Seringapatam class after her capture. The designer of the Révolutionnaire , Pierre-Alexandre-Laurent Forfait, also designed the ship that would become the HMS Surprise featured in the Aubrey-Maturin series. xD: According to records the Révolutionnaire had near perfect sailing qualities, but needed a skilled captain to get her best sailing and speed out of her. Her only faults were because of the differences in French and English design principles; she couldn’t stow as much supplies as English frigates, because of her long and low hull, and she wasn't as strongly built as similar English frigates.
  13. La Mignonne (1765-1797) French, 8-pdr, 30 guns Builder : C. Saussillon (Toulon) 122'2" x 32' x 15'9" (french ft) 26 x 8-pdr + 4 x 4-pdr Razeed in 1793, converting her to a corvette. Captured by the British in 1794. Sources : Boudriot, History of the French Frigate, p. 78-79, 88 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_frigate_Mignonne_(1767)
  14. Looking for names, specs and history. Koopvaardijfregat 'Javaan' Pluto
  15. Privateer Ships by Fredrik Henrik af Chapman Index 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.
  16. A very special ship. Can hardly find any info on it though. How cool would it be to have oars on gunboats in game.
  17. La Comète French fifth Rate 1752 30 guns Designed by Joseph-Louis Ollivier Plans: Ship model and drawings from: http://modelisme.arsenal.free.fr/jacquesmailliere/La%20Comete/index.html Dimensions(Pied du Roi): Lenght: 118' 0'' Breadth: 31' 8'' Depth in hold: 16' 0'' Armament: Gundeck: 26 x 8 French pdr Quarterdeck: 4 x 4 French pdr Crew: 209, 200 crew and 9 officers Sources: Jean Boudriot The History of the French Frigate 1650-1850 http://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=7574 Ornament plans available in French Archives(Number 502): http://www.servicehistorique.sga.defense.gouv.fr/sites/default/files/MV_PLANS-BATIMENTS-A-VOILES.compressed.pdf Thank you LeBoiteux!
  18. 'L'Armide' This ship can be a nice heavy 18-lbr Frigate addition to Naval Action. It can be an all around 44x18lb gun Frigate or can be mounted with carronades for close combat damage. Ship was named after https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Armida During the War of American Independence, Navy minister Sartine, his successor Castries, and engineer Borda requested standard plans to standardize the production of 18-pounder frigates (equivalent to the British Fifth-rate) and so it happened. Commanded by Captain Hugon, she participated in the Battle of Navarino in 1827, killing four and capturing the Turkish corvette Sultania; 1 November 1828 she participated in the attack on the castle of Morea. Designer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jacques-No%C3%ABl_San%C3%A9 Armament: Main - 28x18lb Secondary - 16x18lb or 16x24lb Carronades --- Total 28x18lb 16x18lb or 16x24lb Plans
  19. 'La Resistance' Her sister ship was named 'Vengeance' and both were build in 1794. Resistance was captured in 1797. She was armed with 30x24-pdrs on the main deck and the foremost port. The forecastle was armed with 6x12-pdrs, with 14x12-pdrs on quarterdeck. Total 30x24lb 14x12lb 6x12lb Plans
  20. *Note - all links provided are found online, so use it at your own risk. Hello Shipwrights. links might lead to some interesting information about French ships, but not guaranteed. So, open them at your own risk. http://www.rwmilitarybooks.com/shop_image/product/4f468474d3e1db80c6f24c7efd5855a5.jpg Feel free to go through these links and and learn history. Spend some time on plans and provide info about interesting ships that you like. Let's have some fun and happy reading. Dropbox link:
  21. Carolina Italian/Austro-Hungarian 34 guns 1808 Probably her in 1818: High res plans here:https://www.dropbox.com/s/zsbkvjmtp8ul2fe/CAROLINA%20%281%29.pdf?dl=0 Need info!
  22. Belle Poule or Frigate?

    I've just reached Master Commandant on the PVE server and have been looking to upgrade to a new ship from my Cerberus. I've had some leanings towards the Frigate for a while, but I've heard that many players think that the Belle Poule is an outright better ship, so I'm a bit split on what to do. Does anyone have any suggestions on which way I should go?
  23. Alcmene (1774), an attractive French frigate with luxury accommodations. Admiralty plans for the ship "as taken" in 1779. source: http://collections.rmg.co.uk/collections/objects/83182.html Dimensions: 131' x 35' 2" x 11' 6" Burthen: 731 9/94 BM Armament: QD/FC - 6x French 4pdr / 6x English 6pdr Upper Deck - 26x French 8pdr / 26x English 9pdr
  24. Fifth-rate two-deckers.

    Currently, the entire collection of in-game fifth-rates are true sailing frigates - long, low ships with most of their armament concentrated in a single gun deck. The Renomee seen in game is one of the earliest examples of this type of ship; for the first half of the 1670-1830 time frame the typical fifth-rate or equivalent ship was a compact two-decker, shorter and more upright than later frigates. These ships tended to have 22 guns or fewer on each gun deck and minimal armament on the upper works of the ship, and were given a range of contemporary labels as broad as just 'ship' to the more descriptive French labels like fregate a deux batteries or frigate-vaisseux de premiere ordre. As an example of the type - HMS Rainbow. HMS Rainbow was built after Renomee and her capture; by the time she was launched, she was unfashionable and obsolescent. Rainbow had a perfectly respectable career and for whichever reason was kept in service while the other ships of the 1745 Establishment group of 44-gun ships was broken up or sold out of service; after HMS Crown was broken up in 1770, Rainbow was the last of her class. Small two-deckers like Rainbow were much cheaper to keep on station than powerful ships of the line and would be more powerful than single-deck frigates for a little while longer, so Rainbow was kept occupied and there was even a small resurgence in two-decker fifth-rates with new ships of the Roebuck-class and HMS Serapis being ordered. In one of the larger naval battles of the American War of Independence, Rainbow and HMS Flora with the brig HMS Victor encountered two frigates of the Continental Navy, Boston and Hancock and the captured British frigate Fox - the elderly two-decker was able to pursue the two American ships and then the Hancock when they separated for thirty-nine hours, eventually coming up on Hancock and trading broadsides until the American ship surrendered. In 1782, Rainbow was chosen as the platform for an experimental armament of carronades, which had previously been sold to merchant ships and privateers and not found favour with naval authorities. Thoroughly obsolete by design and thirty-five years old, Rainbow encountered L'Hebe, recently-launched and the first of her class, in the English Channel. L'Hebe's captain became alarmed when he realised the shot fired from Rainbow's bow chasers were 32-pounder balls, reckoning that Rainbow was a disguised ship of the line. On Rainbow's first broadside, a 68-pound cannonball from her main battery carried away Hebe's foremast while another destroyed the helm; Hebe's captain ordered one broadside fired so as not to disgrace the flag before surrendering. Hebe had an extended career in British service, and the state-of-the-art ship was the basis of the Leda-class frigates of which the in-game Trincomalee is an example. Carronades became a typical part of the armament on the Royal Navy's ships after Rainbow's duel, though all-carronade armaments were only used on marginal ships that would not have had adequate armament otherwise. Rainbow herself was placed in ordinary in 1784 and eventually sold out of service in 1802. Her armament varied over her career between 44 and 48 guns. Her original rating reflected an armament of 20x18 pounders, 20x9pounders, and 4x6 pounders on her quarterdeck. Following repairs and recommissioning in 1762 her armament was 20x18 pounders, 22x9 pounders, and 2x6 pounders on her forecastle. When she was armed with carronades she carried 20x68 pounders, 22x42 pounders, and 6x32 pounders with both the forecastle and quarterdeck armed. Records of both the Hancock and Hebe incidents refer to her firing bow chasers, while the plan of her sister ship America shows gun ports at the level of her main battery below the stern gallery. What might she be in-game? A bruiser. A slower and less agile ship the single-deck frigates, but with decent firepower - a broadside of 280-300 pounds - and durability reflecting the additional enclosed deck and her mass and structure being condensed in a shorter ship (She's 17 or 18 feet shorter than Trincomalee). A way for lower-ranked captains to experience the sailing and fighting style of later ships of the line, and at higher levels a tank among frigates and a watchdog and tagger for ships of the line. If, like other fifth-rates, she had the option of an all-carronade armament, the equivalence between carronade and cannon weights is different in game, and the 68/42/32-pounder setup would be more likely to find expression in a 32-42/32/18-24 pounder setup. Yes, Rainbow is a British ship, but I've been able to find plenty of information about her along with plans and models of her sisters and her career as an old-style two-decker that served in the time dominated by single-deck sail frigates is interesting. There are a whole heap of intermediate two-deckers from other nations but I've largely only been able to find minimal information for them - mostly names, service dates, and career highlights with a sort of two out of three of armament, measurements, and crew complement and without models, plans, or art of them. So while I've opened with Rainbow as an example, I invite anyone to discuss any intermediate two-deckers or demi-batteries that would match the in-game fifth rate.
  25. 'Arethusa' Ship that survived 3 wars and captured multiple ships before she was proudly retired in 1815. Enjoy this interesting history stop. Try and Forge your legend only in Naval Action. HMS Arethusa (1781): American Revolutionary War In February 1782, Arethusa captured the French ship Tartare, of fourteen 6-pounder guns. Tartarte was the former British privateer Tartar, which the French ships Aimable and Diligente had captured in September 1780. The Royal Navy took Tartare into service as True Briton. On 20 August 1782, Arethusa recaptured the former British warship Thorn. She was armed with 18 guns and carrying a crew of 71 men. She was also carrying a cargo of 10,000 pounds of indigo and eight hogsheads of tobacco. HMS Arethusa (1781): French Revolutionary Wars Arethusa was assigned to the British Western Frigate Squadron under Commodore John Borlase Warren. The squadron consisted of Flora, Captain Sir John Warren, Arethusa, Captain Sir Edward Pellew, Melampus, Captain Thomas Wells, Concorde, Sir Richard Strachan, and Nymphe, Captain George Murray. These were all 36-gun ships, apart from Nymphe and Arethusa with 38. The Western Frigate Squadron engaged a French squadron off the Île de Batz on 23 April 1794. The squadron had sighted four strange sail which, upon closure, were identified as three French frigates and a corvette. The French squadron included the new French Frigate Pomone which, at 44 guns, was the most powerful ship in action that day. Flora and Arethusa were the first to close with Pomone and Babet, the corvette of 20 guns. The opening shots were fired just before 6 a.m. For about forty-five minutes, the four ships maneuvered against one another without any severe damage being done. Then Flora lost her mainmast and was forced to drop astern. With Flora out of action, Pellew ordered Arethusa to close with the corvette. Arethusa’s carronades quickly destroyed her resistance. Leaving Babet to be finished by Melampus, Arethusa then engaged Pomone, coming to within pistol range at 8.30 a.m. and raking her repeatedly. Within twenty-five minutes one of the finest new French frigates was a ruin, her main and mizzen masts shot away and a fire burning on her aft deck. Just after 9 a.m., Pomone struck her colors. Melampus and Arethusa captured Babet. The action had cost Babet some 30 to 40 of her crew killed and wounded. Arethusa also captured Pomone which had between eighty and a hundred dead or wounded out of her 350-man complement. Arethusa had three men killed and five wounded, a tribute to her superior gunnery. The captured vessels were brought her into Portsmouth, arriving on 30 April. The Royal Navy took Babet and Pomone into service under their existing names. Additionally Concorde captured Engageante in this action. Engageante suffered 30 to 40 men killed and wounded. Concorde lost one man killed and 12 wounded. Heavy mast damage to both vessels delayed their return to Portsmouth. Engageante was taken into British service as a hospital ship. Some four months later, on 23 August, Arethusa and Flora sent their boats into Audierne Bay. There they attacked two French corvettes, Alerte and Espion, driving them ashore. The British took 52 prisoners. On 21 October, the British frigate Artois captured Révolutionnaire at the Action of 21 October 1794. Artois shared the prize money with the other frigates in her squadron, Arethusa, Diamond, and Galatea. In 1795, Arethusa, under the command of Captain Mark Robinson, was one of the Royal Navy vessels, under Borlase Warren's command, that participated in the unsuccessful Quiberon Expedition. Arethusa was part of a fleet under the command of Rear Admiral Sir Henry Harvey, commander-in-chief for the Navy in the Leeward Islands, aboard Prince of Wales, that in February 1797 captured the Spanish-held Caribbean island of Trinidad. The flotilla sailed from Carriacou on 15 February and arrived off Port of Spain the next day. At Port of Spain they found a Spanish squadron consisting of four ships of the line and a frigate, all under the command of Rear-Admiral Don Sebastian Ruiz de Apodaca. Harvey sent Favourite and some of the other smaller ships to protect the transports and anchored his own ships of the line opposite the Spanish squadron. At 2am on 17 February the British discovered that four of the five Spanish vessels were on fire; they were able to capture the 74-gun San Domaso but the others were destroyed. Later that morning General Sir Ralph Abercrombie landed the troops. Captain Wolley of Arethusa superintended the landing. The Governor of Trinidad, José Maria Chacón, surrendered the next day. The flotilla shared in the allocation of £40,000 for the proceeds of the ships taken at Trinidad and of the property found on the island. On 17 April, Arethusa, along with 60 other warships and transports, appeared off the Spanish colonial port city of San Juan, Puerto Rico. The fleet landed a 7,000-man invasion force of Royal Marines, German mercenaries, and black militia troops from the island of Tobago, commanded by General Sir Ralph Abercromby. However, the resolute Spanish defense forced the British to withdraw after two weeks. At daybreak on 10 August, Arethusa, commanded by Captain Thomas Wolley, was in the Atlantic Ocean at 30°49′N 55°50′W / 30.817°N 55.833°W / 30.817; -55.833 when she sighted three ships to windward. At 7:30 a.m. one of the ships bore down to within half gunshot, and opened fire. She proved to be the French 514-ton corvette Gaieté, commanded by Enseigne de vaisseau Jean-François Guignier. Having taken on a ship almost twice her size, mounting forty-four 18-pounder guns, there could only be one outcome, and the French ship was captured within half an hour, having sustained considerable damage to her sails and rigging, and lost two seamen killed and eight wounded. Arethusa lost one seaman killed, and the captain's clerk and two seamen wounded. The Royal Navy took Gaieté into service as Gaiete. On 22nd August 1798 a force of 1,100 French Soldiers landed in County Mayo to support a major rebellion in Ireland and the Militias across the whole of the South of England were mobilized. On the 30th August the Arethusa arrived at Portsmouth from the coast of France and immediately sailed for Southampton River to embark the Dorset and Devon Militias In May 1799 Arethusa came upon seven enemy vessels which made to engage her, but then turned away when she sailed towards them in "a spirited style". Arethusa captured one, an armed ship, which was carrying sundries from Saint-Domingue. Spitfire took the prize into Plymouth on the 23rd while Arethusa sailed off in search of the other six. HMS Arethusa (1781): Napoleonic Wars On 12 December 1805, Arethusa, Boadicea and Wasp left Cork, escorting a convoy of 23 merchant vessels. Four days later the convoy encountered a French squadron consisting of five ships of the line and four sailing frigates, as well as nine other vessels that were too far away for assessment. A letter writer to the Naval Chronicle, describing the encounter, surmised that the distant vessels were the Africa squadron that had been escorted by Lark and that they had captured. On this occasion, the British warships and six merchant vessels went one way and the rest went another way. The French chased the warships and the six for a day, ignored the 17, and eventually gave up their pursuit. Boadicea then shadowed the French while Wasp went back to French and Spanish coasts to alert the British warships there. Arethusa and her six charges encountered the French squadron again the next day, but after a desultory pursuit the French sailed off. During the Action of 23 August 1806, Arethusa and Anson captured the Spanish frigate Pomona, as well as destroying a shore battery and defeating a fleet of gunboats. The captured frigate was taken into the Royal Navy as HMS Cuba. On 1 January 1807 Arethusa, Latona, Anson, Fisgard, and Morne Fortunee captured Curaçao. The Dutch resisted and Arethusa lost two men killed and five wounded; in all, the British lost three killed and 14 wounded. On the ships alone, the Dutch lost six men killed, including Commandant Cornelius J. Evertz, who commanded the Dutch naval force in Curaçao and seven wounded, of whom one died later. With the colony, the British captured the frigate Kenau Hasselar, the sloop Suriname, and two naval schooners. In 1847 the Admiralty authorized the issue of the Naval General Service Medal with clasp “Curacoa 1 Jany. 1807” to any surviving claimants from the action; 65 medals were issued. Niémen was built by Chantier Courau Frères at Bordeaux to a design by Pierre Rolland, carrying 40 guns. She was launched in 1808 but spent only months in French service. She was commissioned at Bordeaux on 22 November 1808, but not completed until January 1809. On 4 April 1809 she sailed under the command of Commandant Jean Dupotet for Fort-de-France with stores and a substantial crew of 319. On 4 April 1809, HMS Amethyst, HMS Emerald, and Arethusa, Captain Robert Mends, encountered the newly built French frigate Niémen. Amethyst and Emerald gave chase, with Emerald falling behind. Amethyst caught up the next day and Niémen engaged each other in a bitter battle. Arethusa arrived on the scene that evening, firing a couple of broadsides at the badly damaged French ship. Either at this point, or the next morning, Niémen surrendered. The Royal Navy took the French frigate into service as Niemen. a boat, under the command of Lieutenant Joseph William Bazalgette of HMS Resistance, captured her on 27 February 1809 off the north coast of Spain. In the action, the lieutenant de vaiseau commanding Mouche No.4 was killed. The prize money notice credited Resistance and HMS Arethusa with the capture. Between 26 and 27 February 1809, Arethusa and Resistance captured four vessels, the 1-gun Mouche No. 4, the Etienneite, Charsier, master, Nancy, Subibelle, master, and a chasse-maree of unkown name. HMS Arethusa (1781): Fate Arethusa was broken up in 1815. Ship Plans
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