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Found 144 results

  1. AHOY There! We are a friendly group of players just looking to have a good time. Our clan rules and structure are fairly clear straightforward, and allow all members to have some say in the direction we take. Feel free to contact our leaders and officers (listed below) if you are interested in joining or have any questions. ¸„•°’ˆ’°•„¸¸„•°’ˆ’°•„¸¸„•°’ˆ’°•„¸ˆ’°•„¸ General Information ¸„•°’ˆ¸„•°’ˆ’°•„¸¸„•°’ˆ’°•„¸¸¸„•°’ˆ’°•„¸ˆ’°•„¸¸„•°’ˆ’°•„¸¸„•°’ˆ’°•„¸„•°’ˆ¸„•°’ˆ¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨¨ˆ’°•„¸ˆ’°•„¸¸„•°’ˆ’°•„¸¸„•°’ˆ’°•„¸¸„•°’ˆ Clan name - AHOY Servers: PvP EU Nation: Great Britain Clan Priority: PvP (Open World PvP, Hunting traders, PvP Events, Port Battles) Time Zones: EU / AUSSIES / US (sorted by numbers) Website: http://ahoy.enjin.com/home TeamSpeak: http://voice378.ismett.de/ Rank required to join: Master and Commander (after small interview) Recruitment: Open (Go to recruitment on the website and fill out an application, or see contacts below) For EU, contact: Horatio Bugler
  2. HMS Mars (1794) HMS Mars was a 74-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 25 October 1794 at Deptford Dockyard. Career In the early part of the French Revolutionary Wars she was assigned to the Channel Fleet. In 1797 under Captain Alexander Hood she was prominent in the Spithead mutiny. In 1798 at the Battle of the Raz de Sein she fought a famous single-ship duel with the French seventy-four Hercule, in the dusk near the Pointe du Raz on the coast of Brittany. Hercule attempted to escape through the Passage du Raz but the tide was running in the wrong direction and she was forced to anchor, giving Captain Hood the chance to attack at close quarters. The two ships were of equal strength, but Hercule was newly commissioned; after more than an hour and a half of bloody fighting at close quarters she struck her flag, having lost over three hundred men. On Mars 31 men were killed and 60 wounded. Among the dead was Captain Hood. Mars fought at Trafalgar where she was heavily damaged as she took fire from five different French and Spanish seventy-fours. Among the 29 killed and 69 wounded in the action was her captain, George Duff. In 1806, on service in the Channel fleet she took part in an action off Chasseron which led to the capture of four French ships. She afterwards served off Portugal and in the Baltic Sea. Fate Mars was placed in ordinary from 1813. She was broken up in 1823.
  3. Feel free to propose other British ships. 6 Guns Armed Cutter 1763 (HMS Sherborne) 14 Guns Brig (Cherokee) 14 Guns Armed Merchant 16 Guns Sloop (HMS Druid) 18 Guns Armed Trader 18 Guns Ship 18 Guns Armed Trader (HMS Minorca) 18 Guns 6th Rate (HMS Advice Prize) 20 Guns Privateer 1727 (HMS Flamborough) 20 Guns Privateer 20 Guns Corvette (HMS Amazon) 22 Guns Frigate 1781 (HMS Myrmidon) 22 Guns 6th Rate (HMS Ariadne) 28 Guns 6th Rate (HMS Lizard) 32 Guns Frigate (HMS Ambuscade) 32 Guns Frigate (HMS Unicorn) 34 Guns Frigate 1777 (USS Hancock/Iris) 38 Guns Frigate (HMS Minerva) 38 Guns Frigate 1794 (HMS Diana) 44 Guns 5th Rate 1646 (HMS Adventure) 44 Guns 5th Rate 1741 (Prince Edward) 44 Guns 5th Rate 1782 (HMS Seraphis) 48 Guns 4th Rate (HMS Mordaunt) 50 Guns 4th Rate 1711 (HMS Ormonde) 50 Guns 4th Rate 1774 (HMS Experiment) 70 Guns 3rd Rate 1679 (HMS Berwick) 70 Guns 3rd Rate 1678 (HMS Lenox) 74 Guns 3rd Rate 1787 (Colossus) 74 Guns 3rd Rate 1778 (HMS Alfred) 74 Guns 3rd Rate 1795 (HMS Kent) French Design 74 Guns 3rd Rate (HMS Anibbal) 74 Guns 3rd Rate (HMS Pegase) 74 Guns 3rd Rate (HMS Pompee) 74 Guns 3rd Rate (Black Prince Class) 80 Guns 2nd Rate (Tonnant) French Design 90 Guns 2nd Rate 1788 (HMS Barfleur) 90 Guns 2nd Rate 1788 (HMS Prince) 98 Guns 2nd Rate 1782 (HMS Glory) 98 Guns 2nd Rate 1782 (HMS Atlas) 98 Guns 2nd Rate 1782 (HMS Duke) 100 Guns 1st Rate 1719 (Royal William) 100 Guns 1st Rate 1670 (HMS Prince) 100 Guns 1st Rate 1786 (HMS Royal Sovereign) 100 Guns 1st Rate 1814 (HMS St. Vincent)
  4. HMS Carysfort was a 9pdr armed, 28 gun, sixth-rate frigate of the Coventry Class, built by the Royal Dockyard at Sheerness. The 28 gun, sixth rate frigate was the smallest vessel of the Royal Navy to meet the definition of a Frigate. Vessels carrying 20 or more guns, but less than 28 guns were classed as sixth rate Post Ships. The Coventry Class was a group of 19 small frigates designed by Sir Thomas Slade, Co-Surveyor of the Navy at the time, of which nine were built in Kent shipyards. The Coventry Class were built in four batches. The first batch of four ships were all ordered in 1756. The second batch of five ships were all built from fir rather than oak for speed of construction and all had short service careers. They were all ordered in 1757. The third batch of nine ships, of which HMS Carysfort was a part, eight of which were also ordered in 1757. They were all oak-built. Although a batch three ship, HMS Carysfort was the last to be ordered, with Sheerness Dockyard not being ordered to build her until 1761. The fourth batch, of two ships was not ordered until 1782, though in the end only one was built. This is because the order for the second ship was cancelled after the shipyard contracted to build her went bust and the contract was not re-placed with anyone else. Sir Thomas Slade is now more famous for what is widely regarded as his masterpiece, the first rate ship HMS Victory. HMS Carysfort was ordered from the Royal Dockyard at Sheerness by the Navy Board on 20th February 1761. At the time the ship was ordered, the Seven Years War was at it's height and the naval element of the war was going very well for the British. From the beginning of the war, the Royal Navy had taken the war to their French and Spanish enemies by attacking their overseas possessions in places all over the world from India and the Pacific Ocean to the Carribean. For that reason, the Seven Years War is regarded as being the first true world war. The Royal Dockyard at Sheerness was working flat out with the repair of warships in addition to the fitting out of warships built at private shipyards on the East and South Kent coasts. In addition to that, the Dockyard at Sheerness only had one slipway and at the time the order for HMS Carysfort came in, that slipway was reserved for the construction of two Niger Class, 12pdr armed, 32 gun frigates. When the order arrived, HMS Montreal was in the final stages of construction and when that ship was launched in September 1761, construction of the next one, HMS Winchelsea began. That ship wasn't launched until May of 1764. For that reason her first keel section wasn't laid on the slipway at Sheerness until June of 1764, by which time the war was over. Her construction was overseen by two Master Shipwrights at Sheerness. Mr John Williams supervised the work in the Mould Loft and the initial stages of her build and when he was promoted to the position of Master Shipwright at Deptford Royal Dockyard in June 1765, he handed the project to his successor at Sheerness, Mr William Gray. He oversaw her final construction and launch on 23rd August 1766. HMS Carysfort was fitted with her guns, masts and rigging at Sheerness and was commissioned into the Royal Navy under Captain George Vandeput in June 1767. On completion, HMS Carysfort was a ship of 586 tons. She was 118ft 4in long on her gundeck, 97ft 3in long at her keel and 33ft 8in wide across her beams. Her hold below the orlop was 10ft 6in deep. HMS Carysfort was armed with 24 9pdr long guns on her gundeck, 4 3pdr long guns on her quarterdeck and in addition to those there were a dozen half-pounder swivel guns attached to her upper deck handrails and in her fighting tops. She was manned by a crew of 200 officers, men, boys and Royal Marines. Plans of HMS Carysfort HMS Carysfort was Captain Vandeput's second appointment after promotion to Captain. His previous appointment had been as Captain in the 20 gun post-ship HMS Surprise. Prior to that, until the end of the war in 1763, he had been Master and Commander in the ten-gun brig-sloop HMS Goree. That vessel had originally been built way back in 1729 as the hoy HMS Hayling but had been converted to carry ten 6pdr long guns, rerigged as a brig and renamed. The normal size of a hoy was around the 60 ton mark and they carried a single mast, but HMS Goree was twice that size. Vandeput had been her final commander before the vessel had been decommissioned and broken up in 1763. With the end of the Seven Years War, thousands of sailors of all ranks were being laid off. At the end of his appointment as Master and Commander in an unrated vessel and without a further appointment, an officer like George Vandeput would normally have reverted to his substantive rank of Lieutenant and would have been laid off on half pay. However, George Vandeput's father, also George was not only a Vice-Admiral, but was a Baronet and an MP to boot, so it's hardly suprising that the junior George Vandeput was promoted at the end of his appointment in HMS Goree and given a command as soon as one became available. On 20th September 1767, HMS Carysfort sailed for the Mediterranean. Her role would have been that of a Royal Navy frigate in peacetime, that of showing the flag and protecting British shipping against attacks by Barbary Corsairs and other pirates. In February 1770, Captain Vandeput was appointed to command the 28 gun sixth rate frigate HMS Solebay and his place in HMS Carysfort was taken by Captain William Hay. Captain Vandeput went on to have a long career in the Royal Navy. Despite being an illegitimate son, he inherited the baronetcy on his father's death and rose to become a full Admiral and served as Commander-in-Chief of the North America Station based in Halifax, Nova Scotia from 1797 until his death at sea in 1800 aboard his flagship, the 64 gun third rate ship of the line HMS Asia. Captain William Hay was an experienced commander who had first held a command at the beginning of the Seven Years War, so was an ideal candidate to command a frigate in peacetime, able to make his own decisions and act on his own initiative, potentially thousands of miles from the nearest higher authority. Shortly after assuming command of HMS Carysfort, Captain Hay received orders to take his ship to the West Indies, to carry out the same role as before, but based in Jamaica. The ship continued in this role until July 1773, when she returned home to Plymouth and was paid off. Although HMS Carysfort was decommissioned, she was never fitted for the Ordinary and spent the next two and a half years secured to a mooring bouy at Plymouth. She would have had a skeleton crew aboard, consisting of her Boatswain, her Gunner, her Carpenter, a Pursers Mate and their respective servants and any maintenance work which would have been required was carried out by gangs of labourers from the dockyard who would have come out to the ship to carry it out. In December 1775, the ship was recommissioned to serve in home waters under Captain Robert Fanshawe. By this time, war was in the air. In order to try to service the huge mountain of debt run up during the Seven Years War, the British Government had attempted to impose taxes on the colonies in America. This had led to political protests, which had escalated into civil unrest and by the time the ship recommissioned, had escalated into a full-scale armed rebellion, with regular British troops being driven off by the part-time soldiers of the Massachusetts Militia in the skirmishes at Concord and Lexington. The war continued to escalate and between April and May 1777, HMS Carysfort underwent a short refit at Plymouth. Meanwhile, in America, things were going from bad to worse. From 1776, the French had been secretly supplying arms, ammunition and money to the American rebels. Their support escalated into ships operating under rebel colours as privateers and what would today be called 'Military Advisors'. After the rebels defeated the British in two battles at Saratoga in 1777, the French invited the rebels to conclude a Treaty of Alliance. King Louis XVI was concerned at reports that following their defeats at Saratoga and the fact that up to that point the rebels were winning, that the British were about to make major concessions. The reports were true. The British parliament had proposed offering the Americans terms which basically gave them what they wanted. These were, never to impose taxes on the colonies again from London without the consent of the people, not to station more troops in the colonies, to repeal all the objectionable acts, full pardons for everyone involved in the rebellion and a cessation of hostilities. A commission was formed which was empowered to negotiate directly with the rebels and agree whatever terms were needed. In order to thwart this, the French signed the Treaty of Alliance with the Americans on 6th February 1778. This Treaty formally recognised the United States of America for the first time and committed the Americans to seeking nothing less than full independence from the UK in return for unlimited amounts of military assistance and money from France. The British hoped that the Americans would respond positively to their offers, but the Americans demanded that the British withdraw all their troops or formally recognise American independence before they were willing to negotiate with the Commission. Their advances to the Americans rejected, on June 17th 1778, Britain formally declared war on France. By September 1778, HMS Carysfort was engaged in operations against the Americans and was the flagship of a force of troopships carrying some 4,000 troops commanded by Major-General Charles Grey, the First Earl Grey. His force of troops had been ordered by General Sir Henry Clinton, the Army Commander-in-Chief, to reduce the area around the Connecticut and Massachusetts Coasts from Long Island as far north as Cape Cod. This was to be achieved by means of a series of large-scale amphibious raids. In the first raid, the fleet sailed up the Acushnet River towards New Bedford and Fairhaven. The troops were landed on Clarks Point on 4th September and spent the night and the next day burning wharves, warehouses and vessels along the whole length of the river. On 6th September, a raid was launched against Fairhaven, but this raid was repelled by a stout defence conducted by the Massachusetts Militia. On September 10th, the force raided the island of Martha's Vineyard and seized livestock totalling 10,000 sheep, 130 oxen plus arms and money. The force arrived back in New York on 17th September with the raids having been a success. In November 1778, Captain Fanshawe was appointed to command the 64 gun third rate ship of the line HMS Monmouth and his place in command of HMS Carysfort was taken by Captain William Cumming. HMS Carysfort was his first appointment after promotion to Captain, his previous appointment had been as Master and Commander in the storeship HMS Supply. By this time the ship had returned to the UK and had paid off for a refit in Plymouth. As part of this work, her armament was increased with the replacement of her forecastle and quarterdeck 3pdr guns with 6pdr long guns. To these were added a total of 6 18pdr carronades, four on the quarterdeck and two on the forecastle. Once the work was complete, the ship commissioned into the Downs Squadron of the North Sea Fleet. On 13th June 1779, HMS Carysfort had her first success in her new assignement when she captured the French privateer L'Esperance. In November 1780, Captain Cumming was replaced in command by Captain William Peacock. HMS Carysfort was his first appointment as Captain, his previous appointment had been as Master and Commander in the gun-brig HMS Childers of ten guns and the following month, the ship sailed once again to join the ongoing war in America. On 24th May 1780, Captain Peacock had his first success in command of the ship when they captured the American privateer General Galvez. HMS Carysfort continued serving in the waters off North America for the rest of the war. In October 1781, following the failure of the Royal Navy to secure the entrance to Chesapeake Bay in the Battle of Chesapeake Bay in the September, General Charles, the Lord Cornwallis was forced to surrender with his army in the Seige of Yorktown. This left the British with insufficient troops to defend their possessions in North America and on 27th February 1782, the British Parliament voted to cease all offensive operations in North America and to seek peace. Despite the overwhelming victories of Sir George Rodney and Sir Samuel Hood in the Battle of the Saintes and the Battle of Mona Passage in April 1782, back in London, political support for the already unpopular war evaporated and the Government of Lord North fell. In late April 1782, Parliament voted to end the war, recognise American Independence and open peace negotiations with France, Spain and Holland. The negotiations resulted in the Treaty of Paris, which was signed by all the parties in September 1783 and was effective from March 1784. The last major British possession in mainland North America, New York City, was finally evacuated in November 1783. The Loyalist communities in North America and those Native American tribes who had been allied to the British and the Loyalist cause were left to their fate. In the meantime, in December 1782, Captain Peacock was replaced in command of HMS Carysfort by Captain John Markham, with orders to take the ship back to Deptford and pay her and her crew off, which he did in January 1783. HMS Carysfort's war was over. HMS Carysfort remained laid up in the River Thames, secured to a mooring bouy off the Royal Dockyard at Deptford until April 1785 she was taken upstream to a private shipyard at Rotherhithe in Surrey to undergo a Great Repair. This would have amounted to a virtual rebuilding of the ship and she emerged from this in an 'as new' condition three months later at a cost of £15,255. The ship returned to her bouy off the Royal Dockyard at Deptford where she remained until November the following year. In January 1787, the ship completed fitting for sea at Deptford Royal Dockyard and was commissioned under Captain Matthew Smith. HMS Carysfort was his first command appointment after having paid off the ex-Dutch 20 gun post-ship HMS Saint Eustatius at the end of the war. Captain Smith took the ship to the Mediterranean, where she was engaged in patrolling, showing the flag and protecting British merchant shipping from Barbary Corsairs. She remained in the Mediterranean until May of 1790, when Captain Smith paid the ship and her crew off back at Deptford. Despite the Spanish Armaments Crisis, HMS Carysfort remained laid up in the River Thames until shortly after the outbreak of the French Revolutionary War in February 1793. In April 1793, HMS Carysfort was once again taken into the Deptford Royal Dockyard and was fitted for sea. The work was completed in September 1793 and the ship recommissioned into the Channel Fleet under Captain Francis Laforey. HMS Carysfort was his first appointment as Captain; his previous appointment had been as Master and Commander in the 14 gun ship-sloop HMS Fairy. HMS Carysfort was engaged in enforcing the blockade of the French Atlantic coast and patrolling the English Channel looking for marauding French privateers and warships hoping to prey on British merchant shipping. On 29th May 1794, HMS Carysfort was engaged in a patrol off Lands End when sails were spotted in the distance. These sails belonged to a Dutch merchant brig which was being towed by the ex-HMS Castor, a 12pdr armed 36 gun frigate which had been captured on 9th May when she and her convoy had run into a squadron of French ships of the line. The French immediately cast off the brig and Captain Laforey took his ship into action. On paper, the Castor was markedly superior to HMS Carysfort, having more men, bigger guns and more of them. After an hour and fifteen minutes however, the Castor struck her colours in surrender to Captain Laforey and his men. HMS Carysfort had suffered casualties of one seaman killed and three seamen and one marine wounded. She had suffered some slight damage in her masts, rigging and hull. The Castor on the other hand had had her main topgallant mast shot away, the rest of her main mast was also badly damaged and her hull had been penetrated in several places. She had suffered sixteen officers, marines and seamen killed with nine wounded. On taking possession of the Castor the British learned that the ship was on her way to Lorient to be fitted for service in the French Navy. The French crew of the Castor had been drafted from amongst the crews of the French ships of the line which had captured her and they were totally unfamiliar with the arrangement of the rigging and really only had the slightest idea how to actually operate the ship. The British also freed a Masters Mate and 18 seamen who, being the remainder of her original British crew, were prisoners of war aboard and were presumably there to show the French how to operate the ship. The rest of the ships officers and crew including her captain, Captain Thomas Troubridge, were still being held aboard the flagship of Rear-Admiral Nielly, the French officer commanding the squadron, the Sans Pareil. The would later be freed when the Sans Pareil was captured by HMS Majestic at the Battle of the Glorious First of June. In the meantime, Captain Laforey took the Castor back to Plymouth. On arrival, the Royal Navy refused to pay Captain Laforey or his men any prize-money for the ship. The reason they gave was that Laforey and the men of HMS Carysfort had simply restored HMS Castor to service. They claimed that because the ship had never been to a French dockyard and been converted for French use, she didn't fall within the legal definition of a Prize and all they were entitled to was a payment related to the salvage of the ship. Captain Laforey and his officers were having none of this and the matter came before an Admiralty Court chaired by Sir James Marriot, a senior judge. After hearing the evidence, including a statement from the French captain, M. L'Huillier, he ruled that because the French admiral in command of the squadron which had captured the ship had full powers to condemn, arm, fit out, man and equip any vessels captured by his ships as he saw fit and that on capture by HMS Carysfort, the Castor had a French crew with a French captain, the ship did fall within the definition of a Prize and that the Royal Navy must pay Captain Laforey and his men her full value. HMS Castor was therefore purchased by the Government and was taken back into the Royal Navy. As a reward for his good conduct during the capture of the Castor, Mr Richard Worsley, HMS Carysfort's First Lieutenant, was appointed Master and Commander in the 16 gun ship-sloop HMS Calypso on 24th June 1794. Later in 1794, HMS Caryfort's armament received a considerable boost when her 18pdr carronades were replaced by 24pdr carronades. Captain Francis Laforey remained in command of HMS Carysfort until he was appointed to command the ex-French 12pdr armed 32 gun frigate HMS L'Aimable in June 1795. He rose to fame when he commanded the ex-French 74 gun third rate ship of the line HMS Spartiate at the Battle of Trafalgar. He rose to become a Rear-Admiral, was knighted in 1815 and died in 1835. Captain Laforey's replacement in HMS Carysfort was Captain John Murray whose previous appointment had been as captain in the ex-French sixth-rate post-ship HMS Babet of 20 guns. In the beginning of 1794, the French government was contemplating sending an expedition to attack British commerce in India and to reinforce French garrisons in the region. Knowing that the Royal Navy was pretty much tied up in the Mediterranean, the English Channel, the North Sea and the Carribean, they concluded that British possessions in the far east would be relatively unprotected and would be easy targets. Rich pickings would be had by raiding and plundering them. The expedition was originally due to be commanded by Rear-Admiral Kerguelen with three 74 gun ships, three large frigates plus smaller vessels. Over time, losses mounted in the French Atlantic Fleet with their defeats at the Battle of the Glorious First of June, the Battle of Ile Groix and of course, the continuous blockade. This forced the French to alter their plans, so that by the time the expedition actually sailed on 4th March 1796, it was under the command of Rear-Admiral Sercey and was to comprise the 44 gun frigate Forte, the 36 gun frigate Regeneree, the en-flute armed frigate Seine, the ship-corvette Bonne Citoyenne and the brig-corvette Mutine. The ships were carrying 800 troops, with two companies of artillery and all the stores and ammunition needed. Things began to go wrong immediately. The force was caught in a storm soon after leaving Lorient. The Bonne Citoyenne parted company from the squadron on 7th March after sustaining damage in the storm. This damage slowed the ship sufficiently that she was able to be caught and captured by a force of British frigates led by Captain Robert Stopford in HMS Phaeton. Soon afterward, the Mutine lost her main topmast and was also quickly caught and captured by the British. The Seine also lost her main topmast but was able to recover it and repair the damage. In the meantime, Captain Murray was replaced in command of HMS Carysfort by Captain Thomas Alexander. Captain Murray was appointed to command the 18pdr armed 36 gun frigate HMS Crescent. The French continued to make their way around the Cape of Good Hope and arrived in the port of St Denis on Reunion Island on 18th July 1796. Other ships had also joined the French force so that by this time, Rear-Admiral Sercey's force comprised six large frigates. Also in the force was the privateer schooner Alerte. On 19th August, the Alerte's master decided that he was going to run down and capture a British East Indiaman he had spotted. Little did he know that the East Indiaman was escorted by a frigate of the Royal Navy, HMS Carysfort and no sooner that he had launched his attack, the British frigate arrived on the scene and the Alerte's crew very quickly found themselves prisoners of war. So quick had been the British frigate, that the French had not had the time to throw their confidential papers overboard and the British came into possession of Rear-Admiral Sercey's plans and detailed orders. The French were unaware of this disaster until the force which the British dispatched to deal with them finally caught up with them on 7th September 1796 and brought the French squadron to action. Two British 74 gun, third rate ships of the line, HMS Victorious and HMS Arrogant inflicted such damage on the French force that they were eventually forced to call off the expedition and return to France, all thanks to the swift action of HMS Carysfort and her crew. In December 1796, Captain Alexander was replaced in command by Captain John Turnor. On 16th December 1799, HMS Carysfort arrived in Plymouth. Amongst her crew was the only survivor of HMS Resistance, a 44 gun two-decker which had blown up while laying off Sumatra. Originally, sixteen men had survived the accident and they had survived on a raft which they were trying to sail to Sumatra. A storm had blown up and only five of the men survived this. They were captured by Malay tribesmen, but only one of them managed to escape alive and he was eventually picked up by HMS Carysfort. After her return to the UK, HMS Carysfort was assigned to the Channel Fleet and between April and June of 1801, HMS Carysfort underwent a refit at Portsmouth. On 24th August 1803, HMS Carysfort in company with the armed cutter HMS Fox captured the French vessel La Dunkerque. On 26th March 1804, HMS Carysfort in company with the 18pdr armed 36 gun frigate HMS Apollo left the Cove of Cork with a convoy of 69 merchant ships bound for the Caribbean. At 3am, off the coast of Portugal, heading south-south-east in a strong south-westerly gale, HMS Apollo ran aground and was wrecked with the loss of 61 officers and men, as were over 20 ships of the convoy. In appalling weather, Captain Robert Fanshawe of HMS Carysfort had no option but to order the rest of the convoy to head out to sea and continue their voyage to the West Indies. The ship remained in the West Indies until she was ordered to escort a homebound convoy in company with the armed storeship HMS Dolphin in June of 1806. At the time, this convoy was being hunted by a squadron of French ships of the line under the French Admiral Willaumez. HMS Carysfort and her convoy managed to avoid being caught by the French and made it safely back to the UK. On arrival in the UK, HMS Carysfort was paid off and laid up at Deptford. The reason was that not only was she by now forty years old, but that small frigates like her were by now obsolete. HMS carysfort remained secured to a mooring bouy off the Royal Dockyard at Deptford until she was sold for £1800 on 28th April 1813 and broken up. Source: Kent History Forum, Bilgerat
  5. HMS Nelson was a 126-gun first rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched on 4 July 1814 at Woolwich Dockyard, but then laid up incomplete at Portsmouth until 1854, when work began with a view to commissioning her for service in the Crimean War, but this ended before much work had been done, and the ship returned to reserve. She was converted into a screw ship in 1860, being cut down to a two-decker and fitted with an engine of 2,102 indicated horsepower (1,567 kW) for a speed of 10.5 knots (19.4 km/h; 12.1 mph). In 1865, Nelson was given to the colony of Victoria as a training ship, and she was finally outfitted and rigged for £42,000 and sailed for Australia in October 1867. Travelling via the Cape of Good Hope, she arrived in February 1868. She was the first ship to dock in the newly constructed Alfred Graving Dock. Her armament in 1874 was listed as two 7-in RML, twenty 64-lb guns, twenty 32-lb guns and six 12-lb howitzers. During 1879-82, Nelson was further cut down to a single deck and her rig reduced to the main mast only, the ship being reclassified as a frigate. Her old armament was partly replaced by modern breech-loaders. She was laid up at Willamstown in 1891, her boilers being removed in 1893. On 28 April 1898 she was put up for auction and sold to Bernard Einerson of Sydney for £2,400. In 1900. Nelson was cut down yet again to create a coal lighter that kept the name Nelson, the upper timbers being used to build a drogher named Oceanic. In 1908 "Nelson" was sold to the Union Steamship Co. of New Zealand, and in July was towed from Sydney to Beauty Point on the Tamar River, Tasmania, for use as a coal storage hulk. She later foundered there with 1,400 tons of coal on board and remained submerged for forty days until finally refloated. In January 1915 she was towed to Hobart for further service as a coal hulk, until sold in August 1920 to Mr. H Gray for £500 and towed an up river to Shag Bay for gradual breaking up, work continuing into the 1930s, although some of her timbers still survive. Guns from HMS Nelson in gardens at Ballarat. The ship's figurehead was preserved by the NSW Naval Brigade, then the Royal Australian Navy, before it was presented to the Australian National Maritime Museum for display. Armament: 126 guns: Gundeck: 32 × 32 pdrs Middle gundeck: 34 × 24 pdrs Upper gundeck: 34 × 18 pdrs Quarterdeck: 6 × 12 pdrs, 10 × 32 pdr carronades Forecastle: 2 × 32 pdr carronades
  6. Time to start another ship, this time the HMS Barfleur (1768), a 90 gun second rate (later 98) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Barfleur_(1768) Took a while to create some clean plans from the ones I found (the best was distorted and the others were very low quality). Just blocking in the shape at the minute using the original plans (2 tier stern gallery) but will modify this to have the actual 3 tier stern gallery that it was built with
  7. Looking for history of this ship. Crew - 400 Armament: 33 × Long 32lb 20 × 42lb
  8. HMS Vernon was a 50-gun fourth rate launched in 1832. The ‘Vernon’ was built at Woolwich Dockyard and measured 176 feet in length by 44 feet in the beam and a tonnage of 1511. She was the first large ship designed by William Symonds in 1831. HMS Vernon was a frigate that saw active service in home waters, the Americas and the East Indies between 1832 and 1848.
  9. HMS Cornwallis was a Royal Navy 54-gun fourth rate. Jemsatjee Bomanjee built the Marquis Cornwallis of teak for the East India Company. In March 1805 Admiral Sir Edward Pellew purchased her from the Company shortly after she returned from an expedition against the Mahe Islands. In February 1811 the Admiralty renamed her HMS Akbar. In December 1801, she sailed, together with the Upton Castle (an Indiaman), the Betsey, an armed HEIC brig, some other vessels, and 1000 troops to Daman and Diu to persuade the Portuguese governor to resist any French incursion. The expedition was under the command of Captain John Mackellar, of the Royal Navy, whose own vessel, Terpsichore, was not ready for sea. The governor accepted the British reinforcements, which, as it turned out, were not needed. On 8 May 1804, Marquis Cornwallis sailed from Portsmouth under the command of Captain Isaac G. Richardson. She sailed via Saint Helena to Bombay, where the company intended for her to remain. She was convoying the Marquis of Ely, the Marchioness of Exeter, the Lord Nelson, the Bruswick, the Princess Charlotte, the Marquis of Wellesley, and the Ann. In 1805 Admiral Pellew purchased her for £68,630. She was commissioned under Commander Charles James Johnson. She then served off Bombay and engaged in the long-distance blockade of Isle de France (now Mauritius). On 11 November 1806, Sceptre and Cornwallis sailed into Saint Paul's Bay, on Île Bonaparte, in an attempt to cut out vessels there, which consisted of the French frigate Sémillante, three other armed ships and twelve captured British ships. (The eight ships that were prizes to Sémillante had a collective value of ₤1.5 million.) They fired on the French and took fire in return. However, when the slight breeze failed, Sceptre and Cornwallis found themselves unable to manoeuvre. They therefore left without having accomplished anything, but apparently also without having suffered damage or losses. In February 1807, Cornwallis was ordered to Australia. She reached Port Jackson by sailing through the Bass Strait, which made her the first Royal Navy ship to traverse the strait. After visiting Port Jackson, Cornwallis sailed to New Zealand and subsequently crossed the Pacific Ocean to the Juan Fernández Islands in the vain hope of finding enemy shipping. Off Valparaiso, an accidental explosion caused serious damage and a number of casualties aboard the frigate, but she was still able to raid Spanish settlements in the region, capturing a number of sheep and pigs and a few small vessels on the Peruvian coast. In September, Cornwallis raided Spanish settlements and shipping near Panama and subsequently visited Acapulco and Hawaii before returning to Madras. In 1808, command passed to Captain Fleetwood Pellew. In this year, Cornwallis, in company with Sceptre, engaged and damaged Sémillante, together with the shore batteries whose protection she had sought. In 1809 Captain William Augustus Montagu took command. Montagu was engaged in a number of operations off the Dutch East Indies, attacking forts on Celebes and Amboyna. In February 1810, the British attacked Amboyna. In the campaign, Cornwallis captured the ship Mandarine, of 16 guns and 66 men, Captain Besman, on 3 February after a chase of four hours. Madarine had been out for four weeks but had captured nothing. Cornwallis suffered only one man wounded in the action. Mandarine then served as a tender to Cornwallis. On the 1st of March Cornwallis chased a Dutch man-of-war brig all day until she took refuge in a small bay on the north side of the island of Amblaw. The wind being light and variable, and night approaching, Montagu sent in Cornwallis's boats, under the command of Lieutenant Henry John Peachy. After rowing all night, they captured the Dutch brig Margaritta Louisa, under Captain De Ruyter on 2 March. Margaritta Louisa was pierced for 14 guns but carried only eight, and a crew of 40 men.[7] Margaritta Louisa had left Surabaya nine days earlier with 20 to 30,000 dollars for Ambonya, and supplies for Ternate. In the boarding, the British had one man seriously wounded and for men lightly wounded; the Dutch lost one man killed and 20 wounded. As the wind was light and variable, and night approaching, Captain Montagu sent the yawl, cutter, and jolly-boat, under the command of Lieutenant Henry John Peachey, assisted by Mr. John Garland the master, and master's mate William Sanderson, to endeavour to bring the vessel out. After a fatiguing pull during the whole night, the boats found themselves, at daylight, close to the vessel : which was the Dutch national brig Margaretta, mounting eight, but pierced for 14 guns, with a crew of 40 men. In the face of a heavy fire of grape and musketry, and of a brave defence by pikes and swords, Lieutenant Peachey and his party boarded and carried the brig, and that with so comparatively slight a loss as one man dangerously, and four slightly wounded. The Dutch had one officer killed and 20 seamen wounded. On 28 March Cornwallis and Dover shared in Samarang's capture of the Dutch brig Recruiter. In late 1810, Cornwallis was deployed with Albemarle Bertie's squadron that forced the surrender of Isle de France. William Fisher took command after Cornwallis' Captain Montagu was selected from among the captains assembled for the invasion and reassigned to lead a naval brigade in support of the British Army forces' ground offensive. Over the next four years Cornwallis remained in the Indian Ocean under various commanders. On 29 June 1811 Salsette captured the slaver Expedition off Mauritius. The prize crew took the ship and the slaves on her to the Portuguese colony of Goa because selling slaves was illegal in British India, but not Goa. Salsette shared the prize money with the crews of Drake and Cornwallis. Between 4 August and 19 September 1811, Akbar participated in the capture of Java. In 1847 the Admiralty awarded the Naval General Service Medal with clasp "Java" to all surviving claimants from the campaign. In the spring of 1813, Captain Archibald Dickson was appointed to command Akbar.[ On 15 May 1814, Akbar captured the Indian Lass. In 1814 Cornwallis traveled to Britain for the first time.
  10. is the Pickle under-gunned?

    I know I know, wikipedia isn't the best source when it comes down to it...but is there any data to back up the claim on wikipedia that the pickle actually had 8 12 pounder cannonades? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Pickle_(1800) also, where is my figurehead!!!!!!! (kidding)
  11. "HMS Neptune was a 98-gun second rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy. She served on a number of stations during the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars and was present at the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805. Neptune was built during the early years of the war with Revolutionary France and was launched in 1797. She almost immediately became caught up in the events of the mutiny at the Nore, and was one of a few loyal ships tasked with attacking mutinous vessels if they could not be brought to order. The mutiny died out before this became necessary and Neptune joined the Channel Fleet. She moved to the Mediterranean in 1799, spending the rest of the French Revolutionary Wars in operations with Vice-Admiral Lord Keith's fleet. After refitting, and spending time on blockades, she formed part of Lord Nelson's fleet at the Battle of Trafalgar, and was heavily involved in the fighting." "In the British Royal Navy, a second rate was a ship of the line which by the start of the 18th century mounted 90 to 98 guns on three gun decks; earlier 17th-century second rates had fewer guns and were originally two-deckers or had only partially armed third gun decks. The term in no way implied that they were of inferior quality. They were essentially smaller and hence cheaper versions of the three-decker first rates. Like the first rates, they fought in the line of battle, but unlike the first rates, which were considered too valuable to risk in distant stations, the second rates often served also in major overseas stations as flagships. They had a reputation for poor handling and slow sailing."
  12. AUSEZ (Australian Colonial Navy) AUSEZ is recruiting on PVP Global for Great Britain We are recruiting Captains interested in all game aspects to swell our ranks (both new and old members are welcome) What We Require -Active players -Voice comms compulsory (we use discord) -Members willing to participate and contribute to the clans direction What We Offer -Numerous opportunities for PVP -PVE -Skilled group of players -Active members We operate in PVP GLOBAL and accept members from all time zones and locations. Feel free to drop into our Discord for a chat: https://discord.gg/UeB8cdf Talk to Fasti or Zealicus for recruitment or post here in this thread! Fair seas! Zeal
  13. I've sat the Arethusa model to the side for now and want to go back and do some more hull modelling. As the Arethusa plans weren't too clear (to a novice in ship design/layout) I decided to find a ship with more detailed plans - the HMS Southampton (1757). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Southampton_(1757) Plans: http://richardsmodelboats.webs.com/32gunfrigate.htm Looks like it has been done a number of times in 3D but this is more an exercise to learn more about ships of the time and to get my modelling skills back up to an acceptable level. Very early days, laying down the hull so to speak
  14. 'Pique' 36x32lb Guns HMS Pique was a wooden fifth-rate sailing frigate of the Royal Navy, launched on 21 July 1834 at Devonport. She was of 1633 tons and had 36 guns. History Under the command of Captain Edward Boxer (3 August 1837 - August 1841), she sailed to North America, the West Indies and the Mediterranean, including operations on the coast of Syria, as part of the squadron led by HMS Cambridge, and including Zebra and Vesuvius. In 1840 Pique saw service in the bombardment of the city of Acre under the command of Admiral Robert Stopford. For the engagement, Pique was assigned to the far northern end of the line, north-northeast of the much larger HMS Waterloo and at a greater distance from the city than the rest of Stopford's fleet. Despite this unfavourable position, accurate gunnery enabled Pique to score several hits on the town. In 2012 renovation works along Acre's city wall uncovered three cannonballs fired by Pique during the battle, the shots having struck within three metres of each other and embedded in the wall at depths of up to 65 centimetres. Between 1841 and 1846 Pique served on the North America and West Indies Station. With HMS Blake, in 1845 she acted as a cable ship for experiments in laying telegraph cable in Portsmouth Harbour. From 26 December 1853 she was commanded by Captain Frederick Nicolson on the Pacific Station, and participated in the 1854 Anglo-French squadron sent to the Russian War and Second Anglo-Chinese War). She was present at the Siege of Petropavlovsk. From 1872 she was a receiving ship, and from 1882 rented as a hospital hulk to Plymouth Borough Council to quarantine sailors who fell victim to a cholera epidemic. She was broken up in 1910. Plans
  15. XCLAN - BEWARE ALL IMITATIONS! At the express command of Big X himself, I am proud to announce the formation of XCLAN, a new British clan on PvP1 EU. While new to Naval Action, we are not new to online gaming. Apparently we have been kicking asses, dromedaries, and even some bottoms since 2002. We also "take names all the way" (Big X - what does that even mean mate?), presumably whenever the mood takes us. We are not to be confused with clan "X" (who they?) or a moderately popular US hip hop band who stole our name before we had even thought of it (see you in court, wise guys!). XCLAN intends to operate on two levels. Firstly, and most importantly, we hope to attract new and returning players of all play styles, be they fighters, traders, crafters, or even general faff around merchants like me who cannot make up their mind what they want to do. We will offer advice on understanding the game mechanics, levelling up quickly, and basically enjoying the game as much as its current alpha state will let us. We will offer material assistance including good ships and mods at reasonable prices produced by our dedicated and experienced crafting team (or by me). All we ask of prospective clan members is a mature attitude and a willingness to pass on the help and advice they receive to future new members. TeamSpeak (with headset and mike) is strongly recommended for those wanting to co-operate with other players in PvP. They may not want you on their team otherwise. For other purposes it is definitely not essential, though we still think you may get more out of the game if you have it. In time, and hopefully by final release, we hope to develop a sub-clan of top tier experienced fighters who can assist our nation in port battles and generally bring confusion to all the King's enemies. That way we hope not to lose our better players to clans that currently do more of that stuff. However, XCLAN is not the Cosa Nostra. We do not require kinky initiation rites, and if you do decide we are not for you and want to leave, we will not make you an offer you can't refuse (10 Mid Grade Notes for 1 Needlefish, anybody?) or involve you in any weird stuff with horses in your bed (or even asses). Please contact spyhunter82 (a.k.a. Big X) if you want to join. You will make his day. And finally, as a patriotic Briton I must end GOD SAVE THE KING! (and all that sail in him)
  16. The day is Friday, October 7th 2016. National politics as of recently has shown that the Pirates has been working together with the Spanish, French, Danish, and Swedish Nations. On almost a regular basis large groups of enemy ships of varying sizes have been spotted off the coastal waters of Kingston/Port Royal the British Capital of the Caribbean. These enemy armadas have coordinated and have become accustomed to relying on one-another to support them as they attempt to intimidate the Royal Navy. Although many smaller defense fleets were formed a main coastal defense fleet was assembled consisting primarily of 1st rate ship-of-the-lines to combat the enemy threats. Video 1 - The main British fleet body finds the enemy French fleet directly in front of the Royal Capital and catches them off-guard despite the enemy having potentially more numbers pooled between the factions. Video 2 - The main British fleet body engages and is victorious against the enemy French Fleet directly in front of the Capital. Immediately after routing the French flotilla the Pirates have positioned their first-rate fleet and is ready for the next engagement. The Royal Defense Fleet fights on despite the enemy having potentially more numbers pooled between the factions.
  17. HMS Halifax (Nova Scotia Packet), 1768

    HMS Halifax (formerly the Nova Soctia Packet) HMS Halifax began life as the Nova Scotia Packet, built by a group of Halifax-based merchants to establish a regular maritime mail and passenger service between Halifax, Nova Scotia, and Boston, Massachusetts. In July 1768 she was commissioned by Admiral Hood to carry dispatches to England. Hood also recommended that the vessel be purchased into service with the Royal Navy, the vessel duly being taken onto strength and refitted in Portsmouth. After its return to North America in January of 1769, Halifax captured the schooner Liberty and had an active service-life until being wrecked in 1775 on Foster Island, off of Maine. Later records include mention of a Halifax on the same lines as the original vessel, so the ship may have been salvaged and returned to service. A two-masted schooner, the Halifax/Nova Scotia Packet is a small vessel, with a deck length of 58 ft 3 in and a beam of 18 ft 3 in. At this size she is smaller than the Cutter, and would make a suitable replacement for the Trader's Cutter, possibly also the Trader's Lynx*, as an entry level trading vessel. As HMS Halifax the vessel carried 6x3-pdr cannon, 3 mounted upon each side, however I cannot find mention of whether the Nova Scotia Packet carried cannon or not. As the smallest cannon available to us in-game is a 4-pdr cannon, it could carry those as its armament as opposed to the 3-pdr, unless in future we'll get the 3-pdr. Regarding cargo capacity, the Halifax had a tonnage capability (burthen) of 83bm. As everything regarding cargo space is boosted, this could be increased to match the tonnage of the Trader's Cutter/Lynx. *It would probably be best to keep one small, fast, vessel suitable for smuggling work. Obligatory pictures of models:
  18. 'Falmouth' The Falmouth was commenced by Mr. Perry to Blackwall Yard (England) on the 22nd of August 1750 and launched on 14th August 1752 as show on page 27 of "Chronicles of Blackwall Yard" by Henry Green and Robert Wigram . It was the first trading vessel of the English Indiaman Companies and showed a close resemblance to a warship in sail plan and rigging, with the most up-to-date reef-points to her topsails The ship was equipped with a large amount of artillery, unusual for the trading vessels of that period. In that she was run along the lines of naval discipline was due to the fact that the vessel could sail alone without any convoy ship, since its rich load was a good bounty for all the enemy vessels and pirate ships. The Falmouth could easily combat a war-ship of the same tonnage, thanks to its crew of 180 experienced men including the best trained gunners. The superiority of the crew was partly due to the incentive granted to each gunman allowing each individual to transport his own 5 tonnage of goods there and 2 tonnage back. These goods were usually sold as smuggled goods to the black market. The Falmouth was of 499 tons and was in service until 1764 completing five voyages for the East India Company under the Captain George Hepburn. She was lost on her sixth voyage, wrecked at Sogar Bank in 1766. Plans
  19. Quiberon: D-Day June 1795

    Some people probably don't know about the french counter-revolution, so here is a bit of context first: The Chouannerie & the Army of the Emigrated In 1795, the french emigration supported by the Brits came back to make a d-day, the Expedition Of Quiberon. It obviously failed, but it is an interesting chapter of History and of a failed d-day.
  20. 'Resolution' HMS Resolution was a 70-gun third-rate ship of the line of the Royal Navy, launched at Harwich Dockyard on 6 December 1667. She was one of only three third rate vessels designed and built by the noted maritime architect Sir Anthony Deane. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Resolution_(1667)
  21. HMS Trusty 50 guns British Fourth Rate 1782 Launched at Bristol in 1782. Broken up in 4/1815. Designed by Edward Hunt. As built: As designed: Rest of the plans: Info: Length of Gundeck: 150' 5 ½" Imperial Feet or 45.7327 meters Length of Keel: 124' 0 ¾" Imperial Feet or 37.8143 meters Breadth: 40' 7 ¾" Imperial Feet or 12.2111 meters Depth in Hold: 17' 9 ¾" Imperial Feet or 5.2007 meters Burthen: 1,088 16⁄94Tons BM Guns as of 09/1782: Lower Gun Deck: 22 x British 24-Pounder Upper Gun Deck: 22 x British 12-Pounder Quarterdeck: 4 x British 6-Pounder Forecastle: 2 x British 6-Pounder Broadside Weight = 414 Imperial Pound ( 187.749 kg) Crew(1782): 350 Guns after 1783: All the 6pdrs were replaced by 14 x 32 pdr carronades. Eight(8) on the quarterdeck and six(6) on the forecastle. Guns(1793): Lower gun deck replaced by carronades. Crew(1793):343 From Rif Winfield's 50-gun ship(page 61): Sources: http://threedecks.org/index.php?display_type=show_ship&id=633 https://www.amazon.com/50-Gun-Ship-Shipshape-Rif-Winfield/dp/1861760256
  22. 'Arethusa' Ship that survived 3 wars and captured multiple ships before she was proudly retired in 1815. Enjoy this interesting history stop. Try and Forge your legend only in Naval Action. HMS Arethusa (1781): American Revolutionary War In February 1782, Arethusa captured the French ship Tartare, of fourteen 6-pounder guns. Tartarte was the former British privateer Tartar, which the French ships Aimable and Diligente had captured in September 1780. The Royal Navy took Tartare into service as True Briton. On 20 August 1782, Arethusa recaptured the former British warship Thorn. She was armed with 18 guns and carrying a crew of 71 men. She was also carrying a cargo of 10,000 pounds of indigo and eight hogsheads of tobacco. HMS Arethusa (1781): French Revolutionary Wars Arethusa was assigned to the British Western Frigate Squadron under Commodore John Borlase Warren. The squadron consisted of Flora, Captain Sir John Warren, Arethusa, Captain Sir Edward Pellew, Melampus, Captain Thomas Wells, Concorde, Sir Richard Strachan, and Nymphe, Captain George Murray. These were all 36-gun ships, apart from Nymphe and Arethusa with 38. The Western Frigate Squadron engaged a French squadron off the Île de Batz on 23 April 1794. The squadron had sighted four strange sail which, upon closure, were identified as three French frigates and a corvette. The French squadron included the new French Frigate Pomone which, at 44 guns, was the most powerful ship in action that day. Flora and Arethusa were the first to close with Pomone and Babet, the corvette of 20 guns. The opening shots were fired just before 6 a.m. For about forty-five minutes, the four ships maneuvered against one another without any severe damage being done. Then Flora lost her mainmast and was forced to drop astern. With Flora out of action, Pellew ordered Arethusa to close with the corvette. Arethusa’s carronades quickly destroyed her resistance. Leaving Babet to be finished by Melampus, Arethusa then engaged Pomone, coming to within pistol range at 8.30 a.m. and raking her repeatedly. Within twenty-five minutes one of the finest new French frigates was a ruin, her main and mizzen masts shot away and a fire burning on her aft deck. Just after 9 a.m., Pomone struck her colors. Melampus and Arethusa captured Babet. The action had cost Babet some 30 to 40 of her crew killed and wounded. Arethusa also captured Pomone which had between eighty and a hundred dead or wounded out of her 350-man complement. Arethusa had three men killed and five wounded, a tribute to her superior gunnery. The captured vessels were brought her into Portsmouth, arriving on 30 April. The Royal Navy took Babet and Pomone into service under their existing names. Additionally Concorde captured Engageante in this action. Engageante suffered 30 to 40 men killed and wounded. Concorde lost one man killed and 12 wounded. Heavy mast damage to both vessels delayed their return to Portsmouth. Engageante was taken into British service as a hospital ship. Some four months later, on 23 August, Arethusa and Flora sent their boats into Audierne Bay. There they attacked two French corvettes, Alerte and Espion, driving them ashore. The British took 52 prisoners. On 21 October, the British frigate Artois captured Révolutionnaire at the Action of 21 October 1794. Artois shared the prize money with the other frigates in her squadron, Arethusa, Diamond, and Galatea. In 1795, Arethusa, under the command of Captain Mark Robinson, was one of the Royal Navy vessels, under Borlase Warren's command, that participated in the unsuccessful Quiberon Expedition. Arethusa was part of a fleet under the command of Rear Admiral Sir Henry Harvey, commander-in-chief for the Navy in the Leeward Islands, aboard Prince of Wales, that in February 1797 captured the Spanish-held Caribbean island of Trinidad. The flotilla sailed from Carriacou on 15 February and arrived off Port of Spain the next day. At Port of Spain they found a Spanish squadron consisting of four ships of the line and a frigate, all under the command of Rear-Admiral Don Sebastian Ruiz de Apodaca. Harvey sent Favourite and some of the other smaller ships to protect the transports and anchored his own ships of the line opposite the Spanish squadron. At 2am on 17 February the British discovered that four of the five Spanish vessels were on fire; they were able to capture the 74-gun San Domaso but the others were destroyed. Later that morning General Sir Ralph Abercrombie landed the troops. Captain Wolley of Arethusa superintended the landing. The Governor of Trinidad, José Maria Chacón, surrendered the next day. The flotilla shared in the allocation of £40,000 for the proceeds of the ships taken at Trinidad and of the property found on the island. On 17 April, Arethusa, along with 60 other warships and transports, appeared off the Spanish colonial port city of San Juan, Puerto Rico. The fleet landed a 7,000-man invasion force of Royal Marines, German mercenaries, and black militia troops from the island of Tobago, commanded by General Sir Ralph Abercromby. However, the resolute Spanish defense forced the British to withdraw after two weeks. At daybreak on 10 August, Arethusa, commanded by Captain Thomas Wolley, was in the Atlantic Ocean at 30°49′N 55°50′W / 30.817°N 55.833°W / 30.817; -55.833 when she sighted three ships to windward. At 7:30 a.m. one of the ships bore down to within half gunshot, and opened fire. She proved to be the French 514-ton corvette Gaieté, commanded by Enseigne de vaisseau Jean-François Guignier. Having taken on a ship almost twice her size, mounting forty-four 18-pounder guns, there could only be one outcome, and the French ship was captured within half an hour, having sustained considerable damage to her sails and rigging, and lost two seamen killed and eight wounded. Arethusa lost one seaman killed, and the captain's clerk and two seamen wounded. The Royal Navy took Gaieté into service as Gaiete. On 22nd August 1798 a force of 1,100 French Soldiers landed in County Mayo to support a major rebellion in Ireland and the Militias across the whole of the South of England were mobilized. On the 30th August the Arethusa arrived at Portsmouth from the coast of France and immediately sailed for Southampton River to embark the Dorset and Devon Militias In May 1799 Arethusa came upon seven enemy vessels which made to engage her, but then turned away when she sailed towards them in "a spirited style". Arethusa captured one, an armed ship, which was carrying sundries from Saint-Domingue. Spitfire took the prize into Plymouth on the 23rd while Arethusa sailed off in search of the other six. HMS Arethusa (1781): Napoleonic Wars On 12 December 1805, Arethusa, Boadicea and Wasp left Cork, escorting a convoy of 23 merchant vessels. Four days later the convoy encountered a French squadron consisting of five ships of the line and four sailing frigates, as well as nine other vessels that were too far away for assessment. A letter writer to the Naval Chronicle, describing the encounter, surmised that the distant vessels were the Africa squadron that had been escorted by Lark and that they had captured. On this occasion, the British warships and six merchant vessels went one way and the rest went another way. The French chased the warships and the six for a day, ignored the 17, and eventually gave up their pursuit. Boadicea then shadowed the French while Wasp went back to French and Spanish coasts to alert the British warships there. Arethusa and her six charges encountered the French squadron again the next day, but after a desultory pursuit the French sailed off. During the Action of 23 August 1806, Arethusa and Anson captured the Spanish frigate Pomona, as well as destroying a shore battery and defeating a fleet of gunboats. The captured frigate was taken into the Royal Navy as HMS Cuba. On 1 January 1807 Arethusa, Latona, Anson, Fisgard, and Morne Fortunee captured Curaçao. The Dutch resisted and Arethusa lost two men killed and five wounded; in all, the British lost three killed and 14 wounded. On the ships alone, the Dutch lost six men killed, including Commandant Cornelius J. Evertz, who commanded the Dutch naval force in Curaçao and seven wounded, of whom one died later. With the colony, the British captured the frigate Kenau Hasselar, the sloop Suriname, and two naval schooners. In 1847 the Admiralty authorized the issue of the Naval General Service Medal with clasp “Curacoa 1 Jany. 1807” to any surviving claimants from the action; 65 medals were issued. Niémen was built by Chantier Courau Frères at Bordeaux to a design by Pierre Rolland, carrying 40 guns. She was launched in 1808 but spent only months in French service. She was commissioned at Bordeaux on 22 November 1808, but not completed until January 1809. On 4 April 1809 she sailed under the command of Commandant Jean Dupotet for Fort-de-France with stores and a substantial crew of 319. On 4 April 1809, HMS Amethyst, HMS Emerald, and Arethusa, Captain Robert Mends, encountered the newly built French frigate Niémen. Amethyst and Emerald gave chase, with Emerald falling behind. Amethyst caught up the next day and Niémen engaged each other in a bitter battle. Arethusa arrived on the scene that evening, firing a couple of broadsides at the badly damaged French ship. Either at this point, or the next morning, Niémen surrendered. The Royal Navy took the French frigate into service as Niemen. a boat, under the command of Lieutenant Joseph William Bazalgette of HMS Resistance, captured her on 27 February 1809 off the north coast of Spain. In the action, the lieutenant de vaiseau commanding Mouche No.4 was killed. The prize money notice credited Resistance and HMS Arethusa with the capture. Between 26 and 27 February 1809, Arethusa and Resistance captured four vessels, the 1-gun Mouche No. 4, the Etienneite, Charsier, master, Nancy, Subibelle, master, and a chasse-maree of unkown name. HMS Arethusa (1781): Fate Arethusa was broken up in 1815. Ship Plans
  23. 'Boadicea' 1797 Very active ship with rich history. Boadicea was one of a batch of large frigates ordered in 1795, all of which were the largest of their type, and the majority of which were to the draught of captured French ships, the Navy then being under the sway of Middleton and the French school of thought, a school supposing that the design of warships in France was of a higher quality. She was built to the design of Imperieuse, a 40-gun ship completed in 1787 and captured in October 1793. Changes were made to the shape of the topsides, and the scantlings and fastenings were strengthened to reflect British practice. She retained her shallow French hull form, and as a result the holds and magazines were considered cramped. More history and action can be found here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Boadicea_(1797) Armament: Upper deck: 28 × 18-pounder guns QD: 8 × 9-pounder guns + 6 × 32-pounder carronades FC: 2 × 9-pounder guns + 2 × 32-pounder carronades Ship Plans
  24. 'Foudroyant' HMS Foudroyant was an 80-gun third rate of the Royal Navy, one of only two British-built 80-gun ships of the period (the other was HMS Caesar (1793). Foudroyant was built in the dockyard at Plymouth Dock (a.k.a. Devonport) and launched on 31 March 1798. Foudroyant served Nelson as his flagship from 6 June 1799 until the end of June 1801. Foudroyant had a long and successful career, and although she was not involved in any major fleet action, she did provide invaluable service to numerous admirals throughout her 17 years on active service. In her last years she became a training vessel for boys. Plans Design Her designer was Sir John Henslow. She was named after the 80-gun Foudroyant, which Swiftsure and Monmouth, both 70-gun ships, and Hampton Court (64 guns), had captured from the French on 28 February 1758. Foudroyant was a one-off design. She followed French practice of favoring large two-decked, third rates mounting 80 guns rather than the typical British preference for building three-decked second-rate ships mounting 98 guns. The two ship types, despite the difference in absolute gun numbers, had similar gun power but the British thought the second rate had a more imposing appearance and some advantages in battle, while they considered the 80 gun ship as usually faster and less 'leewardly'. Career: 12th October 1798: Fought at the Battle of Tory Island which was commanded by Commodore John Warren, during which the French 74 Hoche (renamed Donegal), and the frigates Bellone (renamed Proserpine), Embuscade and Coquille, were captured. (Capt. Thomas Byard) June 1799: Arrived at Palermo, where Nelson took her as his flagship. (Capt. Thomas Hardy) Nov 1799 - Feb 1800: At the blockade of Malta. (Capt. Edward Berry) Feb 1800: Captured the Généreux (Capt. Edward Berry) March 1800: Captured the Guillaume Tell (Capt. Edward Berry). The Guillaume Tell and Généreux were the only two remaining ships from the Battle of the Nile, and Nelson was delighted to have caught them. 1801: Assisted with the British landing at Egypt under Admiral Lord Keith. (Capt. Philip Beaver) 13th March 1806: With the London and Amazon, captured the French Marengo(74) and La Belle Poule(40). (Capt. John Chambers White) November 1807: Part of the blockade of the Tagus (Capt. Norborne Thompson). 1808: Rear-Admiral William Sidney Smith's flagship in the South American Station. 1812: Returned to England. 1820: Became a guardship at Plymouth. 1861: Became a training ship. 1892: She was sold to be exhibited at seaside resorts, but she became grounded and wrecked at Blackpool. But, aside from Victory, she was the only other of Nelson's ships to survive long enough to be photographed. Nelson's flagship as Rear-Admiral from June 1799 - July 1800 whilst he was in Palermo, although sometimes he just had his flag raised in her whilst he was ashore. It was aboard her that the Neapolitan Admiral was controversially tried and sentenced to death, and it is likely that Nelson and Emma Hamilton's daughter, Horatia, was conceived on board when Nelson took the Hamiltons to Malta in late April or early May 1800.
  25. HMS Archer, and the Archer-class of gun-brigs From 1793 to 1813, the Royal Navy demanded large numbers of small armed brigs for coastal warfare. These were smaller than the brig-sloops or man-of-war brigs, with a complement of 50 men under the command of a Lieutenant. Some were converted from merchant ships, while most were built to order - the most common design of these gun-brigs was the Archer-class by William Rule, consisting of 58 ships. These ships were workhorses, most with individually undistinguished careers or a supporting role apart from some colourful exceptions; HMS Staunch, for instance, was decorated for its efforts in the 1810 Mauritius campaign, while HMS Manly was captured and recaptured twice, spending half of its life in the Dutch and Danish navies, making the ship itself something of a battleground. It is worth noting that these ships were built at a great rate - the first 10 Archer-class ships were ordered on the 30th of December, 1800, and the last of that batch, HMS Constant, was launched on the 28th of April, 1801 and completed fitting out on the 10th of June that year. Also worth noting is that arming these tiny brigs to the teeth gave them a marked tendency to roll. Measurements Length at gundeck: 80' (24 m) Length at keel: 65' 10.25" (20.072m) Beam: 22' 6" (6.86m) Depth of hold: 9' 5" (2.87m) Tonnage (by burthen, not displacement): 177 31/94; 177.3298 tonnes burthen Armament: Broadsides: 10x18-pounder carronades Bow chasers: 2x18-pounder carronades (from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_gun-brigs_of_the_Royal_Navy#Archer_class_.281801_batch.29) What could she be in game? A low-level ship that doesn't handle like a the others, a square-rigged ship with both broadside guns and bow chasers for people who want to jump in the deep end early. For more experienced players, she would still be an ideal interdictor for the smallest trade ships, and the combination of an in-game 7th-rate's turn speed and bow chasers could make her a potent shallow-water warship in its own right.
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