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Credible and authentic playstyle pyrate/buccaneer/privateer/filibustier/corsair gameplay in Naval Action Discuss history and share roleplay captain diaries. Review film, music and books.

  1. What's new in this club
  2. Got this from Twitter, I think this has its place here... Link here: https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/5573/page/1 (thanks to Game-Labs )
  3. Hethwill the Harmless

    The Bermuda Privateer

    Thank you. https://www.amazon.com/Bermuda-Privateer-Nicholas-Fallon-Novels/dp/1590137442
  4. jpjchris

    Washington's Navy

    Fantastic thread, wonderful history....thank you for sharing 😊
  5. I would like to recommend a fairly new age of sail book series. There is one book currently available with another due this November. The author is William Westbrook. His first book its titled 'The Bermuda Privateer'. The second book, due to be released in November 2018, is titled 'The Black Ring'. The first book was very fast paced with lots of action. Overall, I wouldn't put it in the Patrick O'Brian category, but if you want a very fun and relatively quick read, then I would suggest the author. Think Patrick O'Brian without all of the character backstory. Although I love the Patrick O'Brian style, this series is refreshing for it's brevity. A good end of summer read. o7 Captiva
  6. Now for the American version of events. The following comes from the Newburyport Herald and Country Gazette (Massachusetts), of October 18, 1814. "... On the 11th, Nantucket bore north, about a quarter of a mile distant from the land, discovered a frigate off Gayhead which gave chase and came up with a fresh breeze, while we were becalmed. At 3 PM we took a breeze and took the Douglass in tow. The frigate was about four leagues from us At [/} the wind died away calm. At 7 P.M. was obliged to come to anchor, and supposing the frigate would send her boats to attempt to capture us, [we] prepared accordingly. At 8 P.M. a signal was made from the prize that the boats were coming - soon afterwards discovered them - five in number, and in a few minutes they were alongside. The action commenced and continued for 20 minutes, when the enemy were repulsed in every attempt to board, and obliged to surrender. When the launches and barges left the frigate, they had on board 104 souls including the officers. One launch having on board 48 men was sunk with only two men saved; one which had 32 men on board at the commencement of the action was taken possession of, she had 8 men killed 20 wounded and 4 unhurt, the three others drifted from alongside the brig with the current without a man to be seen in them (supposed thy must have been killed or wounded), and had not a boat to go after them, and had only 4 men left not killed or wounded. The barges were two on each side and one under the privateer's stern. The barges and launch were from the Endymion frigate. Kept the launch with their prisoners in it along side all night, not daring to let them come on board, as we had only 8 men left for duty. In the morning permitted Mr. F. Ormond, 2nd lieutenant, 3 midshipmen and one masters mate, to come on board and after they signed a parole, pledging their honor for themselves and the rest of the prisoners (25 seamen and marines) that they would not serve against the United States during the war until regularly exchanged, sent them ashore at Nantucket, not knowing the situation of the place with the British. At The commencement of the action, the Price of Neufchatel had 40 men at quarters, including officers, (and had 37 prisoners on board) of which 6 were killed, 15 severely wounded, 9 slightly wounded and 10 unhurt. The next day sent 17 prisoners on shore, and put them in the hands of the Martial, and also sent on shore all of our severely wounded men. ... On Friday ... saw the Endymion also at anchor in Tarpaulin Cove. She had sent a boat to Nantucket to inquire what had become of her barges and men. ... The boats which drifted from alongside the privateer, at the end of the action, had been picked up by her [Endymion] The report was that nearly all were killed and wounded in them."
  7. From the PRO in Kew, Reference numbers ADMI/507, XC 22779A "[To:] Honorable Alexander Cochrane, K.B. Admiral of the Red, and Commander in Chief, , Etc, etc, Superb at Halifax 15th November, 1814. Sir, It is with extreme regret I do myself the honor to transmit to you herewith, a copy of a letter and its enclosures dated the 11th Ultimo, which I have received from Captain Hope of His Majesty's Ship Endymion detailing the particulars of a gallant but unsuccessful attack made by the boats of that ship under the direction of Lieutenants Hawkins, Armond, and Fanshaw on an enemy privateer, under circumstances so trying and difficult as to reflect the highest credit on the officers and men engaged in the occasion and whilst I deplore with Captain Hope the loss of so many valuable lives it is a consolation to [illegible] the spirit with which the attack was renewed affords an ample proof off the determined coolness and bearing of the officers and men, and that valor of His Majesty's Subjects was ... displayed. ... I have the honor to be, Sir, your most obedient humble servant Henry Hotham, Rear Admiral" Hope's Letter: "Copy, Henry Hotham, Rear Admiral His Majesty's Ship Endymion Off Nantucket, 11th October, 1814. Sir, I have the honor of informing you that yesterday returning to my station, a ship and a schooner were discovered to the Westward of Nantucket nearly becalmed under the low land endeavoring to pass between that island and the southern shoals. From the offing we continued to chase them until evening. The wind then entirely left us as it had previously done with the vessels in shore, who had made no progress whatever. I sent all boats under the command of Lieutenants Hawkins, Armond and Fanshaw. In approaching the ship, an alarm was fired; the boats had been previously rowing up under a shoal and had not felt the effects of a rapid tide which they almost instantaneously became exposed to; the second barge, in taking the station assigned by Lieutenant Hawkins, on the schooner's starboard bow, having her larboard oars shot away instantaneously was swept by the stream athwart the first barge, thereby all the boats became entangled, and it is with extreme concern I acquaint you that the attack was in consequence at the moment was only partially made. Notwithstanding this disadvantage at the first .... and every exertion that human skill and determined bravery could devise was resorted to , to revive the contest and they succeeded in again getting alongside, but not in the positions intended; their failure therefore is to be ascribed in the first instant to the velocity off the tide, the height of the vessel's side, not having channel plates to assist the men in getting on her deck and her very superior force. (A schooner of the largest dimensions, the Prince de Neufchatel, three hundred and twenty tons, eighteen guns, long nine and twelve pounders, with a complement of one hundred and forty men of all nations, commanded by Mons. Jean Ordsonaux) the boats painter now being shot away, they again fell astern without ever being able to repeat the attack, and with great difficulty regained the ship, with the exception of the second barge which I have every reason to believe sunk alongside the schooner. In transmitting this report, I can not help but deplore the unhappy issue of the enterprise, it would be great injustice to the officers and men of the boats if I omitted to say that their bravery and coolness is deserving every praise, I therefore sir beg to impress you with the belief that in no instance could either the officers and men have conducted themselves with greater determination than on the present occasion. I lament exceedingly the deaths of Lieutenant Hawkins, and Mr. Dalzeel, midshipman, who fell early in the action with many other seamen and marines. Enclosed you will find a return of the killed and wounded. the ship that was in company with the privateer is the Douglass at Nantucket on their parole. Signed Henry Hope. From Lieutenant Armond I learn that as much as we have suffered on this occasion, the enemy's loss was still greater, fifteen only of their crew having escaped the well directed and devastating fire from the boats." [Note: then followed a detailed list of the casualties by name, which I will omit.] Total Killed ,17 Total wounded and died of wounds, 45 [including the surgeon, severely wounded!] Total killed and wounded, 62." Here is the entry of the Captain's log of the Endymion, 11 Oct., 1814, reference ADM51/ 2324 XC1084: "At 4 light airs and variable. Calm and fine. out boats. sent them manned and armed with 105 men and officers in chase of the schooner, which we supposed to be a privateer and her prize and anchored S.W. from the S. end of Nantucket. Burnt blue lights and rockets to send our position to the boats. The enemy opened a fired on the boats which continued 20 minutes. Midnight calm and fine. 3 AM calm and fine. The launch, barge, cutter and gig returned being repulsed by the enemy with the loss of 10 killed and 31 wounded, lieuts Hawkins, Armond, 4 mids and 30 seamen and marines missing with our yawl. Daylight weighed and hoisted in the boats, and made all sail to the westward
  8. Powderhorn

    Washington's Navy

    I bet dollars to donuts that Warren was named for General Joseph Warren, MD, killed in action at Bunker Hill. You may also note the Pine Tree in the canton of the flag of the Continental Army.
  9. Hethwill the Harmless

    Washington's Navy

    Was chasing this one, thanks Vernon. So, three of the schooners were named for three congressmen that helped navigate the legal waters when dealing with prizes. Franklin Lynch Harrison add also the Warren Lee and then two more, fitted at Plymouth, Washington Harrison
  10. Battle Flag: USS Hannah: Chased ashore by British Sloop HMS Nautilus
  11. Nick the cursed

    #antimetaleague

    A Snow, filled with pyrates hungry at the edge of the mutiny, but ya heal them with rum, they'll follow ya everywhere... #RumRationsMod #OakCrewSpace (dont expect them to demast a ship, arrr)
  12. Hethwill the Harmless

    Resolute convoy escort - unequal contest

    also the same episode as registered in Naval History of Great Britain - Vol III / 1800 / Light Squadrons and Single Ships p.56/57 Milbrook / Millbrook, 1797 Type: Experimental Schooner ; Armament 16 x 18-pdrs carronades Launched : 1797 BM: 148 tons On the 13th of November, early in the morning, the Milbrook, then lying becalmed off the bar of Oporto, descried a French ship, wearing a pendant, and, to all appearance, a frigate of 36 guns. Having under his protection two brigs of a Newfoundland convoy, and observing several other vessels in the offing, which, if as he conjectured English merchantmen, were equally an object of desire to the Frenchmen, Lieutenant Smith got out his sweeps, and pulled towards the enemy. At 8 A.M. the schooner received a broadside from the ship, which was the celebrated French privateer Bellone, of Bordeaux. Before the Bellone could bring her second broadside to bear, the Milbrook had fired three broadsides, and by the time the former had fired her third, the schooner had discharged eleven broadsides. Such was the rapidity of firing where no time was lost by running out the guns. The carronades of the Milbrook were seemingly fired with as much precision as quickness; for the Bellone, from broadsides fell to single guns, and showed, by her sails and rigging, how much she had been cut up by the schooner's shot. At about 10 A.M. the ship's colours came down; and Lieutenant Smith used immediate endeavours to take possession of her. Not having a rope left wherewith to hoist out a boat, he launched one over the gunwale; but, having been pierced with shot in various directions, the boat soon filled with water. At this time the Milbrook, having had 10 of her guns disabled, her masts, yards, sails, and rigging wounded and shot through, and all her sweeps cut to pieces, lay quite unmanageable, with her broadside to the Bellone's stern. In a little while a light breeze sprang up, and the Bellone, hoisting all the canvass she could set, sought safety in flight. Out of the 47 men of her crew, the Milbrook had eight seamen and one marine severely, and her master (Thomas Fletcher, but who would not quit the deck), surgeon's mate (I. Parster), and one seaman, slightly wounded. The loss sustained by the Bellone, as rumoured at Vigo, into which port she was compelled to put, amounted, out of a crew probably of 250 or 260 men, to 20 killed, her first and second captains and 45 men wounded. The guns of the Bellone, as already has been stated, consisted of 24 long French 8-pounders and six or eight brass 36-pounder carronades. The ship, therefore, was almost quadruple superior to the Milbrook ; and Lieutenant Smith, by his gallantry and seamanlike conduct, not only preserved from capture a valuable convoy, but added, in no slight degree, to the naval renown of his country. This became appreciated in the proper quarter, and Lieutenant Smith was promoted to the rank of commander. Also the English factory at Oporto, to evince their sense of the service performed by the Milbrook, voted Lieutenant Smith their thanks, accompanied by a piece of plate of 50£ value.
  13. Powderhorn

    #antimetaleague

    Yeah, I keep a store-bought frigate in reserve to cap new AI vessels so I don't go in the negatives, financially
  14. Hethwill the Harmless

    #antimetaleague

    So... live off the loot you get ? Very survival. Very pyratey.
  15. Powderhorn

    #antimetaleague

    I'm trying a new thing where I play it like I play Escape from Tarkov. Cap an AI vessel, try to capture up and keep going from there. If I lose, who cares? Makes the other player happy. If I win, more's the glory!
  16. Early in the morning on the 13th of November, the Milbrooke schooner, of 16 guns, and 45 men, commanded by Lieutenant Matthew Smith, being off Oporto with two brigs of the Newfoundland convoy under his protection, fell in with a French privateer ship, of 36 guns; Lieutenant Smith at this time observed several other vessels in the offing, which he had reason to suppose was a part also of the above convoy. The vast superiority of the enemy's force did not operate on the gallant spirit of Lieutenant Smith, whose principal object was the preservation of his convoy; he therefore came to the resolution of giving the enemy battle, and in order to give his convoy a more favourable opportunity to escape, he made sail to close with her. It being nearly calm, it was eight or nine o'clock before the Milbrooke arrived within gun-shot of her antagonist, when a spirited action commenced, and was maintained with great bravery until near ten o'clock, when the enemy's colours appeared to be struck: but the Milbrooke at this time having ten of her guns disabled, the masts, yards, sails, and rigging, much wounded and cut to pieces, Lieutenant Smith could not prevent the enemy from taking advantage of a breeze springing up, and with the assistance of his sweeps to get off. In this unequal contest the Milbrooke had only ten wounded; amongst them were Mr. Thomas Fletcher, the master, and Mr. J. Parston, surgeon's mate. The enemy's vessel, which proved to be La Bellone, of 36 guns and 320 men, put into Vigo, with the loss, it was said, of 20 men killed, the first and second captains, and 45 wounded. ( literal source. The British Trident Vol. IV )
  17. Hethwill the Harmless

    #antimetaleague

    Despite the "hidden agenda" there are enough cases reported with raiders overcrowding ships. Actually flushing the below deck thoroughly to accommodate more crew - even at the expense of some of the ship's original build solidity - was fairly common practice amongst sea rover types.
  18. Banished Privateer

    #antimetaleague

    I use Xebec with 350 crew at least (370+ preferred) and I rageboard everything. That way it's a campaign to remove determined defender from the game. Everyone knows that DD is the current game meta and best way to beat it is spam crew and rageboard DD ships.
  19. Hethwill the Harmless

    #antimetaleague

    What rules you use to "mimic" navy/sea rover age of sail life - be it sloop captain, be it trade interdiction with frigate or even trade escort.
  20. Hethwill the Harmless

    interesting tidbits

    Back to tidbits after the Commercial break.
  21. Hethwill the Harmless

    interesting tidbits

  22. Angus MacDuff

    interesting tidbits

    Should be read with the music "Barrett's Privateer" playing in the background.
  23. Hethwill the Harmless

    interesting tidbits

    While the celebrated "yankee privateers" or "french corsairs" tend to occupy most of the breathing space, especially during the late 1700's and up to 1815, both the english and french canadian bourne privateering ventures shouldn't be overlooked as they proved time and again to be, once all accounts are settled, way more proficient than their yank counterparts and definitely comparable, in grit and courage to the likes of Allemand or Surcouf. Just a small sideline on how costly it was to get a license. Spoils of War: Privateering in Nova Scotia ... https://novascotia.ca/archives/privateers/
  24. Interesting bits of information should be posted here. Specific discussions about each or any are certainly worth their own thread.
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