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Credible and authentic playstyle pyrate/buccaneer/privateer/filibustier/corsair gameplay in Naval Action Discuss history and share roleplay captain diaries. Review film, music and books.

  1. What's new in this club
  2. Sir Hethwill the RedDuke

    interesting tidbits

    Back to tidbits after the Commercial break.
  3. Sir Hethwill the RedDuke

    interesting tidbits

  4. Oberon74

    interesting tidbits

    Should be read with the music "Barrett's Privateer" playing in the background.
  5. Sir Hethwill the RedDuke

    interesting tidbits

    While the celebrated "yankee privateers" or "french corsairs" tend to occupy most of the breathing space, especially during the late 1700's and up to 1815, both the english and french canadian bourne privateering ventures shouldn't be overlooked as they proved time and again to be, once all accounts are settled, way more proficient than their yank counterparts and definitely comparable, in grit and courage to the likes of Allemand or Surcouf. Just a small sideline on how costly it was to get a license. Spoils of War: Privateering in Nova Scotia ... https://novascotia.ca/archives/privateers/
  6. Interesting bits of information should be posted here. Specific discussions about each or any are certainly worth their own thread.
  7. Chance, Captain White commanding, 94 lives, 16 guns, 12 and 6-pounder carronades. - Vice-Admiral Sir Roger Curtis, Bart., Commander-in-Chief of His Majesty's ships and vessels at the Cape of Good Hope, who writes from Capetown on December 20th, 1801, to Evan Nepean, Esq., Secretary to the Admiralty, as follows: - letter from Mr. William White, commander of the Chance private ship of war, fitted out at the Cape of Good Hope, to Vice-Admiral Sir Roger Curtis, Bart: "At four p.m. on August 19th (1801), the island St. Laurence bearing N.E. two leagues, saw a large ship bearing down upon us. At nine brought her to close action, and engaged her within half pistol-shot for an hour and a half, but finding her metal much heavier than ours, and full of men, boarded her on the starboard quarter, lashing the Chance's bowsprit to her mizzen-mast, and, after a desperate resistance of three-quarters of an hour, beat them off the upper deck; but they still defended from the cabin and lower deck with long pikes in a most gallant manner, till they had twenty-five men killed and twenty-eight wounded, of whom the captain was one. Getting final possession, she was so close to the island that with much difficulty we got her off shore, all her braces and rigging being cut to pieces by our grape-shot. She proved to be the new Spanish ship Amiable Maria, of about 600 tons, mounting fourteen guns, 18, 12, and 9-pounders, brass, and carrying 120 men, from Concepcion bound to Lima, laden with corn, wine, bale goods, etc. On this occasion, I am much concerned to state, Mr. Bennett, a very valuable and brave officer, was so dangerously wounded that he died three days after the action; the second and fourth mates, Marine officer, and two seamen badly wounded by pikes, but since recovered. On the 20th, both ships being much disabled, and having more prisoners than crew, I stood close in and sent eighty-six on shore in the large ship's launch to Lima. We afterwards learned that seventeen of the wounded had died. "At 4 a.m. on September 24th, standing in to cut out from the roads of Puna, in Guaiquil Bay, a ship I had information of, mounting twenty-two guns, fell in with a large Spanish brig, with a broad pendant at maintopmast-head. At five she commenced her fire on us, but she being at a distance to windward,and desirous to bring her to close action, we received three broadsides before a shot was returned. At half-past five, being yardarm and yardarm, commenced our fire with great effect, and, after a very severe action of two hours and three-quarters, during the latter part of which she made every effort to get away, I had the honour to see the Spanish flag struck to the Chance. She proved to be the Spanish man-of-war brig Limeno, mounting eighteen long 6-pound guns, commanded by Commodore Don Philip de Martinez, the senior officer of the Spanish Marine on that coast, and manned with 140 men, sent from Guaiquil for the express purpose of taking the Chance, and then to proceed to the northward to take three English whalers lying in one of their ports. She had fourteen men killed and seven wounded; the captain mortally wounded, who died two days after the action. The Chance had two men killed and one wounded, and had only fifty men at the commencement of the action; mounting sixteen guns, 12-and 6-pounders." _______________________________ http://www.cambridge.org/pt/academic/subjects/history/military-history/privateers-and-privateering also available in https://www.gutenberg.org
  8. Transcribe as Registered in LOCAL HISTORIAN'S TABLE BOOK, OF REMARKABLE OCCURRENCES, Historical Facts, Traditions, LEGENDARY AND DESCRIPTIVE BALLADS, Ac., &c., CONNECTED WITH THE COUNTIES OF NEWCASTLE-UPON-TYNE, NORTHUMBERLAND AND DURHAM. https://play.google.com/books/reader?id=yhcHAAAAQAAJ Another report of the same encounter can be found in the London Gazette of 16 June 1744. https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/8337/page/1 ------------------- During the last long-protracted war, the Sunderland colliers often defied and beat off the enemy's privateers. The following instance of heroism, related in the Percy Anecdotes, is scarcely to be paralleled in the annals of British daring : The Isabella, of Sunderland, captain Hornsby, while steering for the Hague, fell in with the Marquis of Brancas, a French privateer, with a crew of 75 men, ten guns, and eight swivels, besides 300 small arms. The Isabella's crew consisted of five men and two boys : she carried four guns and two swivels. Upon observing the privateer, captain Hornsby asked his men to stand by him ; they promised to stand by him to the last. He then hoisted the British colours ; returned the fire of the enemy's chase with his two swivels. The Frenchman called upon him to strike. He coolly returned an answer of defiance. Upon this the privateer poured such showers of bullets into the Isabella, that her crew retreated to close quarters. Twice the enemy attempted to board on the larboard quarter ; Hornsby by a turn of the helm, frustrated their attempts. The Frenchman still kept firing upon him. The action had now lasted an hour, when the privateer running furiously upon his larboard bow, entangled his bowsprit among the shrouds. The captain of the privateer bawled out - "Strike you English dog." - Hornsby challenged him to come on board and strike his colours if he durst. The Frenchman then threw twenty men on board ; but a general discharge of blunderbusses from the Isabella's crew soon caused them to retreat. The ships now got disentangled, and the privateer tried to board on the starboard side ; when Hornsby and his mate shot each his man as they were lashing the ships together. The Frenchmen again commanded him to strike ; upon his refusal, twenty fresh men were ordered to attack the crew in their quarters with hatchets and pole axes ; but Hornsby and his crew, from their close quarters, kept up a constant fire, and a second time the Frenchmen retreated, hauling their dead after them with hooks. The ships being still lashed together, the enemy kept up a constant fire upon their close quarters; Hornsby returned the fire with spirit and effect. Observing them crowded together behind their mainmast for shelter, he aimed a blunderbuss, which happened to be doubly loaded, through a mistake, with twice twelve balls, which burst and threw him down ; but in an instant he started up, though much bruised. The blunderbuss made terrible havoc among the Frenchmen; they disentangled the ships, leaving their pistols, pole-axes, and graplings behind them. Hornsby then fired his two starboard guns into the enemy's stern. The ships engaged each other for two hours, yard-arm to yard-arm. The Isabella's hull, masts, yards, sails, and rigging, were shot through and through, and her ensign dismantled. A shot striking the Brancas between wind and water, she sheered off. Hornsby, erected his shattered ensign, and gave the Frenchman three cheers. The Frenchman returning, fired a dreadful volley into the stern of the Isabella. Captain Hornsby was wounded in the temple, which bled profusely. He called to his men to stand to their arms ; and taking close quarters, they sus tained the shock of three most tremendous broadsides, returning the fire, and the privateer again sheered off. They cheered and set up again their ensign. The Frenchman returned, and fired two broad sides, summoning a surrender — a final defiance was hurled at him. The captain of the privateer ran his ship alongside — his crew refused to board. He then cut the lashings and sheered off. Hornsby fired a gun ; upon which the magazine blew up, and the privateer went to the bottom. Out of 75 men, 36 were killed or wounded ; all the rest perished in the deep except three. _________________________________ In September 1744 George II awarded Hornsby a gold medal and chain worth £100 for his bravery, at a ceremony at Kensington Palace. The medal was engraved in italics and read "His Majesty’s Reward to Richd. Hornby [sic] of the Wrightson and Isabell for Bravely defending her with five men & three boys against a French privateer of 70 men and blowing up the privateer June 2 1744" His men each received a bounty of £5, whilst the boys received a mere 40 shillings. The original gold medal was the Royal Family medal of 1732 and depicts King George II and Queen Caroline on the obverse. The reverse contains the busts of seven royal children. The medal was struck by John Croker from dies prepared by John Sigismund Tanner and is only found struck in gold, silver and copper. The medal was produced by order of the King for distribution to foreign Princes and to other persons, whom His Majesty was pleased to honour. ( in The Hornsby Medal, by Sim Comfort https://www.medalcollectors.org/Archives/MCA Advisory April-May 2011.pdf )
  9. As printed originally in the Naval Chronicles Volume 25 https://archive.org/details/navalchronicleco25londiala Extract of a Letter from Gibraltar, dated January 7, 1743.* The most gallant action which haas been performed in the present war happened in sight of this garrison, a little to the east of Europa Point, and almost in reach of our guns, on the 27th past, as follows : The Pulteney privateer, a large brigantine, mounting 16 carriage, and 26 swivels, Captain James Purcell, had been cruising in the Streight's mouth, and was standing in for this bay from the west, but with little or no wind. As soon as she'was seen from Old Gibraltar, two great Spanish xebeques, each carrying 120 men, 12 carriage guns, and a great number of pattereroes and musquetoons were sent out, and looking upon her as already their own, made great haste with their oars, and soon came up with her. There was in the bay an 80 gun-ship, but without a main-top-mast; so that there was no assisting the privateer but by a reinforcement of men; which might very easily have been sent when the xebeques first stood out; but the sea officers, though applied to, refused so reasonable a request, alleging that it was impossible so small a vessel, even full of men, could escape so superior a force. The brave Captain Purcell was, however, of a different opinion; and though he had in all but 42 men, and of those three wounded, yet he was resolved not to give up a vessel that had the honour of a commission from the Admiralty, till the last necessity; and finding his officers and men in the same disposition, they prepared for an obstinate defence. After a few single guns, the Spaniards came near and hailed the vessel by her name, and the captain by his; entreating him to strike and preserve their lives, otherwise no quarter. These threats were returned with guns. The Spaniards attempted to board, but were resolutely beat off, they attempted it twice more, but Captain Purcell prudently reserving half his broadside, they had not courage to board him, but exposed themselves so much, particularly in the last push, that they could stand it no longer, but made off with their oars towards Malaga, having lost half their men. The engagement lasted an hour and three quarters, and the Pulteney had but one man shot through the body, and five more very much wounded ; but what is very remarkable, every man on board was shot through his cloaths, and the sails ^and rigging were all shot to pieces. Some nine pounders went through his hull and masts. The Pulteney remaining becalmed after the battle, several boats went and towed her round, and the garrison have so high a sense of the great merit of the action, of which many hundreds of them were witnesses, that the governor and officers have made up a handsome sum for a large piece of plate, as a present to the captain, with a proper inscription ; and the merchants and other inhabitants will do the same in another piece; the sailors having already received a present from them in money.
  10. Nick the cursed

    House rules discussion

    This is on PvE server, now, only for the story (TP's issues)... I mainly play on PvP EU, but thanks to bring that here! BTW, the Snow stay my love, to sail... (Prince de Neufchatel seems to be a good ship, too, but don't say it to my Snow, he'll be jealous)
  11. Skully

    House rules discussion

    Let me help you there Nick.
  12. Nick the cursed

    House rules discussion

    My playstyle as pirate? Simple, only sail 7/6th rate (mostly a Snow/Privateer) bought in shop from NPC, Fir, Teak or Bermuda with Crew Space (pirates was overcrewed on their ships hyistorically speaking and it don't cost me a million) fitted for cannon and boarding. And i operate from Freetowns, chasing players traders and flee against warships. And sometimes, i sail back to Mortimer to sell goods i stole (only things of value), fight a bit on Frigate with clan mates and sail again in another freetown to harass another nation... I don't search best PvP kills or something like that, i just want to be a pain for Nats!
  13. Sir Hethwill the RedDuke

    House rules discussion

    I remember that topic was a good one. Truth is, same with Shelby up there. He does act as a Navy captain searching for glory and fame, no matter the game nation choice, even if flying the black. The playstyle is entirely the "romantic" master and commander archetype. The guidelines we set define the character we play. Obviously a national rover is a privateer, alas Pirate, well, is a proper independent.
  14. Skully

    House rules discussion

    I never claimed to be robber-at-sea, but simply took the role of Pirate as it was provided by the game. I do however still claim the same name as opposed to some other true Pirates.
  15. Sir Hethwill the RedDuke

    House rules discussion

    Yes, you are correct The house rules are part of the character guidelines. How does a Pirate pirate falls into a "naval supremacy" situation, as it is where the story starts, as opposed to the robber-at-sea credible approach !? We may assume his story to be under "private commission" ?
  16. Skully

    House rules discussion

    If we are talking mission, then the mission is creating stories with as many players involved as possible. With a certain captain rallying the British defenses. To bring about:
  17. Faye Kert is the type of research historian writer I admire. It baits the line and follows it up to the source, and in doing it reveals a lot more than the usual myths and mainstream misconceptions. On Patriots & Profits she focus two decades of research into a focused work on the Yank and Canadian Atlantic privateering covering the most important names, numbers, places and, most important, the how everything links together in the "war of privateers" par excellence. Full chapters dedicated to how privateer ventures were set, how ships were chosen, armed, equipped. A in depth and most important chapter covers insurance, both on the new world side and back in London with a superb representation on how some seemingly minor acts conducted by privateers, totally not mainstream, actually molded economy more than the big frigate combats. The record entries cover very important aspects and should give any Naval Action player an idea of how it was in reality and how 'easy' we have it in game most especially regarding traders, prices of cargo and amounts carried by brigs, snows, pink and even indiaman. The entire economic side of the privateer war is ever present. I would say it is colossal and traces the entire war escalation of prices, insurance prizes, taxes on products and services, harbor business and all other economic activities affecting the communities as far as London and South Carolina. Combat and notable events are covered in rigorous form with extracts from the logs paired with how the news were presented to the public in the periodic newspapers. The presented data will break a few mainstream misconceptions but factual hard data is uncontestable. This is not a mere book. It is a life's work dedicated to investigation of the last big privateer drive in the age of sail in the anglo-saxon universe. Must buy!
  18. Sir Hethwill the RedDuke

    House rules discussion

    Surely tells me nothing about how you setup your playstyle and personal guidelines other than what we know, kill, maim, burn, by whatever means necessary Shelby up there goes out on cruise with a mission. We can trace some real life Royal Navy captains to have similar stances during their careers. Even US captains. Tracing a comparison from his playstyle to historical events the only major difference is that those captains did what they did for their Nation prestige. In the case of Shelby it will be mostly in his own namesake and community group in extension.
  19. Skully

    House rules discussion

    Being called a scum at the end of the day means a job well done.
  20. TommyShelby

    House rules discussion

    Well, about 18 months ago i set out on a quest to create a certain reputation for myself. I wanted (And always did) to be recognized as a most honourable and noble Captain. To achieve this a few guidelines were made; 1. Traders = Off Limits. 2. Low ranking players = Off Limits. 3. Ships smaller than my own = Off Limits. 4. If someone attacks me, fights well and acts honourably, i will not sink/capture them. 5. If i'm engaged with someone and notices that they, to be blunt, are bad at the game, i will immobilize them in one way or another and then give them some advice and let them go. At first this worked well, i only had good fights and i had plenty of them. However since then the game has changed and now i can spend 10 hours in-game without a single good fight. If i'm lucky enough to find 2 or 3 players in similar ships i'll still be called a ganker. Doesn't matter what you do really, if you win, your a ganker (Even if you were outgunned and outnumbered). In my eyes, my play-style provided people with good fights and lots of room to become better players. I provided nice content for alot of people without being unfair to the new players and the traders. Unfortunately my play-style is now dead, its not worth the time and effort anymore because you are punished for playing this way. And while many say to me; "Tommy, Legends will be perfect for you, only fair fights!!". I have to say this, i hate the thought of Legends. NA is awesome because of the OW setting, the fact that i don't know what i will find when venturing out into the OW is so cool. Fights always are different from the last one.
  21. Sir Hethwill the RedDuke

    House rules discussion

    Naval Action gives us a setting, a universe in which we can play a character. It also gives us the rulebook, way to solve interaction. Being sandbox means that anything beyond the "starting point" is not written, so stories can unfold and, given quality, could become canon. This is not uncommon in many game universes alas usually fictional setups like Battletech or Warhammer, where special community events actually are used by the designers to mold the lore, but I digress as Naval Action is very much based in History, but... ... we are not playing to reenact History, right ? We are playing to re-interpret it by correct usage of the Lore and Rulebook, meaning Age of Sail in the West Indies, Spanish Main and Independent southernmost 13 Colonies and use the game mechanics as much as possible to make a credible gameplay. What house rules do you setup to make your sea rover gameplay pleasing and as authentic as possible ? As an example, when I play Pirate I do set the aim for the share per crewman. So the more prizes with the less crew as possible makes my character a most successful captain, whereas very little coin makes me a lousy one. As a rule of thumb, I set my own baseline at 1000 Gold per crew per cruise ( from departure from port to next return to port ). Anything below is a poor performance. I have other own rules but would like to hear from yours.
  22. Sir Hethwill the RedDuke

    Book review #1 - Sea Rover's Practice, Benerson Little

    Hey there Nick. After a search couldn't really find any translations being available at google level. This doesn't mean there aren't specialized publishers that might have taken it. The english version is very fluid and with no grammar high complexity but is full of maritime lingo, so a normal knowledge of things should suffice. Will wait for your reviews on the french publications, not my strongest language by far but can read it with a fair degree of understanding.
  23. Nick the cursed

    Book review #1 - Sea Rover's Practice, Benerson Little

    No hope to find it in French translation, i suppose? I saw some extracts on internet... It seems to be a nice book. Do you think it's hard to read for someone who know read "basic english"? If no, i'll try to find it! I have some books about piracy, pirates, etc... but in french, i'll post them when i'll have a bit time.
  24. Benerson Little does a very focused study on localized tactics related to sea rovers as opposed the more classic approach of pirates and other similar activities as a culture. It concentrates the attention on the day to day life and how to survive as a sea rover. From the getting a crew together, to arming a ship, to setting sail, to set a ambush, to approach the prey, to board it and to sail it to safety so plunder can be shared. No more, no less. No romanticism involved. After all a sea rover life was a history of survival against the odds in a fairly "unknown" game. Adaptation to the present situations, as mr. Little well puts, was the best weapon for the rover. Not the ship, not the amount of guns or crew. Instead of a modern revisionism he focus on the grit that carries the day and how the prize was taken. The when, how and what of any particular prize taking as authentic as possible. More so due to the hands on approach to the tools used by the sea rovers. From false papers to blunderbuss and cutlass. The references to historical records are superb and down to the point and not lost in some "ideal" image of the pirate as depicted in the victorian era of "adventure in the high seas". It shows how much is false by exposing what was real. It is a great starting point for any "serious" fan studies and opens way to a diversity of subjects, especially the difference in the early stages of buccaneering brotherhoods against the "enemies of mankind" republic. Be ready to re-learn and have your pre-conceptions grinded down to dust, in a good way. More so, the author did put all his work into practice by going hands on in the Black Sails TV show, season 1, where several specific historical records were most faithfully represented in the series. Read the book, check the historical records and then re-watch the episodes sequences relating to the particular situation. They are well described so easy to link the two. I got myself the softcover edition due to the hardcover being out of stock. The recycled paper is really good and not the usual run of the mill version. The prink ink is also very good and does not stain with natural skin moisture. A must buy !
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